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#21 X-Files

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 1222 PM

Researchers found a tunnel under the Temple of the Snake in the pre-Hispanic city of Teotihuacan, about 28 miles northeast of Mexico City. The tunnel had apparently been sealed off around 1,800 years ago.

Researchers of Mexico's National University made the finding with a radar device. Closer study revealed a "representation of the underworld," in the words of archaeologist Sergio Gomez Chavez, of Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History.

Experts found "a route of symbols, whose conclusion appears to lie in the funeral chambers at the end of the tunnel."

The structure is 15 yards beneath the ground, and it runs eastwards. It is about 130 yards long.


http://www.physorg.c...ple-mexico.html

Post your From Dusk Til Dawn quips below.
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#22 X-Files

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Posted 14 June 2011 - 1842 PM

Quang Ngai, Vietnam (CNN) -- Nestled in the mountain foothills of a remote province in central Vietnam, one of the country's most important archaeological discoveries in a century has recently come to light. After five years of exploration and excavation, a team of archaeologists has uncovered a 127-kilometer (79-mile) wall -- which locals have called "Vietnam's Great Wall."
Professor Phan Huy Lê, president of the Vietnam Association of Historians, said: "This is the longest monument in Southeast Asia." The wall is built of alternating sections of stone and earth, with some sections reaching a height of up to four meters.


http://edition.cnn.c...l?iref=obinsite
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#23 X-Files

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 0851 AM

Dormice, sea urchins and fresh figs were among the delicacies enjoyed by ordinary Romans, British archaeologists have revealed after discovering a giant septic tank at one of the ancient cities destroyed by the eruption of Mt Vesuvius.

http://www.telegraph...t-revealed.html
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#24 rmgill

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 1045 AM

Page me when they find this...


Posted Image



Wrong one. Besides, they found it in 1928.
Posted Image

It's under a mountain somewhere in USAF control. ;)
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#25 rmgill

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 1048 AM

Dormice, sea urchins and fresh figs were among the delicacies enjoyed by ordinary Romans.


:blink:

I had to go look that up....

Posted Image

http://en.wikipedia....Edible_dormouse


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=an3uh9_IubE&feature=related

Edited by rmgill, 15 June 2011 - 1049 AM.

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#26 Marek Tucan

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 0825 AM

Roman man's burden ;)

I would guess the Roman Empire and the British one had a lot in common - and British colonies and military garrisons also often gave shelter to refugees from local conflicts, no? Both to friendly local lords and to people. If they felt like it.
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#27 Ivanhoe

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 1042 AM

I suspect it often came down to what the local commander wanted to do. Besides, I suspect some of that Scottish Totty looked very welcoming to a lonely Roman soldier stood on the edge of the empire. ^_^


Might have been confused by the kilts... :huh:
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#28 T19

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 1335 PM

I would think Roman and Scotish would both be in a sort of kilt, unless they wore Trouse

#29 T19

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 1347 PM

I would think Roman and Scotish would both be in a sort of kilt, unless they wore Trouse


On further thought, maybe this is how the Romans took care of the PA back in the day... put them in camps outside the wall... on wait thats what we do today. guess times dont change

#30 Richard Lindquist

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 1423 PM

I would think Roman and Scotish would both be in a sort of kilt, unless they wore Trouse




TREWS (letters north!)
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#31 MiloMorai

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 1429 PM

trousers
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#32 Marek Tucan

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 0549 AM

Now they have unearthed laboratory apparatus and chemicals that belonged to Joseph Black. The scientist was a professor of chemistry at the university in the 1700s and discovered carbon dioxide gas.


So he's to blame for the global warming, no?:ph34r:
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#33 Brad Sallows

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 0658 AM

>Samples of mercury, arsenic and cobalt were found in the haul along with glass tubes, bottle stoppers and thermometers and storage jars.

...at which point the archaeological dig halted and a hazmat team with bucket loaders and dump trucks came in to scour the site to a depth of five metres and transport all the waste to a soil disposal site...
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#34 X-Files

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 1701 PM

Institute first-aid kit found on a 2000-year-old shipwreck has provided a remarkable insight into the medicines concocted by ancient physicians to cure sailors of dysentery and other ailments.

Medicines found inside a wooden chest included pills made of ground-up vegetables, herbs and plants such as celery, onions, carrots, cabbage, alfalfa and chestnuts - all ingredients referred to in classical medical texts.


http://www.nzherald....jectid=10737289


TEL EL-SAFI, Israel – At the remains of an ancient metropolis in southern Israel, archaeologists are piecing together the history of a people remembered chiefly as the bad guys of the Hebrew Bible.

The city of Gath, where the annual digging season began this week, is helping scholars paint a more nuanced portrait of the Philistines, who appear in the biblical story as the perennial enemies of the Israelites.

Close to three millennia ago, Gath was on the frontier between the Philistines, who occupied the Mediterranean coastal plain, and the Israelites, who controlled the inland hills. The city's most famous resident, according to the Book of Samuel, was Goliath -- the giant warrior improbably felled by the young shepherd David and his sling.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.c.../#ixzz1RoiJXQlA

Edited by X-Files, 11 July 2011 - 1206 PM.

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#35 X-Files

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 1107 AM

A 3,000-year-old defensive wall possibly built by King Solomon has been unearthed in Jerusalem, according to the Israeli archaeologist who led the excavation. The discovery appears to validate a Bible passage, she says.


http://news.national...erusalem-bible/
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#36 X-Files

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 1311 PM

(Reuters) - An early prehistoric hearth has been discovered on the planned construction site for a branch of supermarket chain Sainsbury's.

The charcoal remains, excavated from the site in Nairn, a town in the Scottish Highlands, date back to the Mesolithic period (10,000 to 4000 BC). They are believed to have been a temporary travelling stop rather than a settlement, due to the absence of any further Mesolithic findings at the site.


http://uk.reuters.co...E76I4WG20110719

http://www.bbc.co.uk...slands-14189794
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#37 X-Files

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Posted 24 July 2011 - 1152 AM

There are more than 700 curious tunnel networks in Bavaria, but their purpose remains a mystery. Were they built as graves for the souls of the dead, as ritual spaces or as hideaways from marauding bandits? Archeologists are now exploring the subterranean vaults to unravel their secrets.

http://www.spiegel.d...,775348,00.html
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#38 X-Files

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 0815 AM

It's one of the most significant pieces of prehistoric art ever found in North America — a carving of a mammoth or mastodon on a piece of fossilized bone dating back to the Ice Age. An amateur fossil hunter found it several years ago in Vero Beach, Florida. Now, after three years of study, a team of researchers say they believe it's authentic.

http://www.npr.org/2011/07/25/137549198/florida-fossil-hunter-gets-credit-for-big-find
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#39 DKTanker

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 0827 AM

http://www.npr.org/2...-big-find<br />

It's one of the most significant pieces of prehistoric art ever found in North America — a carving of a mammoth or mastodon on a piece of fossilized bone dating back to the Ice Age. An amateur fossil hunter found it several years ago in Vero Beach, Florida. Now, after three years of study, a team of researchers say they believe it's authentic.


Sure, that makes sense. There is no reason to think the great annual snowbird migrations were initated by WASPs and JAPs, it's likely been going on for tens and hundreds of millineum.
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#40 X-Files

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 2019 PM

It may not be a $500 million golden hoard, but underwater archaeologists are nevertheless excited about finding what they believe are traces of the five ships that British privateer Henry Morgan lost off the coast of Panama in 1671.
The discovery was made at the mouth of Panama's Chagres River, near another underwater site where six iron cannons were found. Taken together, the evidence suggests that the three-century-old story of Captain Morgan's lost fleet is finally near its conclusion.

http://cosmiclog.msn...ost-fleet-found

With the financial help of the rum maker, a U.S. team of archaeologists just unearthed a portion of one of Sir Henry's lost five ships near the Lajas Reef at the mouth of the Chagres River in central Panama. Specifically: the starboard side of one ship's hull, including, according to Discovery, "a series of unopened cargo boxes and chests encrusted in coral."

Read more: http://newsfeed.time.../#ixzz1UUQRdjvW

Edited by X-Files, 08 August 2011 - 2023 PM.

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