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#7201 Panzermann

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 1540 PM

Some bits of modern handling are not as obviously modern as others. I also give a pass to the modern finger along the trigger guard positioning as a reasonable concession to safety and I am used to old movie conventions like HE rounds without fragments.

The SMLE assault rifle carry jarred my suspension of disbelief, though.

 

holding a rifle in a high ready has been a thing in hunting at least for a long time. makes more sense than holding it low and then to raise it when a target presents itself. then there are always smelly fans that extoll the virtue of being able to cycle the SMLE in front of your face making it the most inmportant thing a bolt-action rifle can do.

 

 

And how else than with the support hand are they to hold their torches going inot hte bunker? doesn't look modern to me in the 1917 trailer and who says that those old war movies did it right, that formed our ideas of how they did things back in the day?


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#7202 R011

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 2108 PM

Plenty of crappy books out too and lots of old war movies were not very good. Mendes usually tells an interesting story well and the trailer doesn't look bad. I can wait until the film comes out to see if it's worth watching.
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#7203 Mikel2

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 0007 AM

How was Peter Jackson's colorized documentary?
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#7204 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 0658 AM

 

 

Just saw "In Which We Serve" produced in 1942 about a Royal Navy destroyer crew. Exceptionally well done. As an American, I was amazed on how fast the English accent could be spoken.

 

Its a lightly fictionalized telling of the life of HMS Kelly, warship of Lord Louis Mountbatten, with whom Noel Coward was best buddies. The scene at the end where he gives a talk to the survivors of the crew, many of the numbers were made up of sailors from a recent sinking by a U boat, whom happened to be at the port waiting for a new ship.

 

 

They even managed to borrow a captured Junkers Ju-88 from the RAF for the filming of the bombing scene, it was not the usual newsreel or combat footage inserted into the film.

 

 

Is that right? I wondered where it came from. Would this be the nightfighter that defected, that is now in Hendon?


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#7205 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 0700 AM

How was Peter Jackson's colorized documentary?

 

Awesome.


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#7206 RETAC21

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 0858 AM

 

Good film. If you like that, see 'The Cruel Sea'.

 

 

Just seen this one, good movie, done at the right time, just telling a story and letting it stand. Dunkirk like at times.


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#7207 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 1306 PM

It stands up there as comparable to Das Boot I think. The other side of the same story. I really must get the book one of these days.

 

There is another films which I think has been somewhat neglected, which is kind of a submarine version of 'In which we serve'. it is somewhat contrived, it is a propaganda film, but for all that its worth watching. The scenes where they are diving the boat were definately put together by someone who had experience on boats.

 

There is also this, which I think ranks as a damn good thriller. Its also worth watching for Lawrence Oliver with the worlds worst comedy French accent. :) Again, a propaganda film, but a pretty damn good one for all that. It was actually made to convince America to join the war, the irony is by the time it was released, America was already in the war.


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#7208 NickM

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 1815 PM

 

 

Good film. If you like that, see 'The Cruel Sea'.

 

 

Just seen this one, good movie, done at the right time, just telling a story and letting it stand. Dunkirk like at times.

 

Yes...saw it when I was in College in Greece in the early 1980s--the one exception to the Tuesday Night Western. Even though it was the 1950s it was very effective--and after having his first ship torpedoed out from under him, the captain, upon boarding his new corvette, imagines he hears the screams of the engine room crew thru the communications pipes. THAT was kind of shudder inducing.


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#7209 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 0216 AM

Yeah, that was really well done.

 

Im lead to believe that the incident where he depth charges the sailors in the water actually happened, but I believe it happened in the Indian Ocean. A Hospital ship was Torpedoed by a Japanese Submarine (the crew of which apparently in an earlier battle decapitated the crew of a merchantman they sank, by fishing them out the drink and excecuting them on the deck). Anyway a warship found a target, and it was directly under a group of people in the water, some of them nurses, and had to attack it. They sank the submarine, but the commander in later years was unable to deal with the guilt and killed himself.

 

Jack Hawkins absolutely nailed that part. He should have got a reward for it.


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#7210 R011

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 1013 AM

 

Some bits of modern handling are not as obviously modern as others. I also give a pass to the modern finger along the trigger guard positioning as a reasonable concession to safety and I am used to old movie conventions like HE rounds without fragments.

The SMLE assault rifle carry jarred my suspension of disbelief, though.

 

holding a rifle in a high ready has been a thing in hunting at least for a long time. makes more sense than holding it low and then to raise it when a target presents itself. then there are always smelly fans that extoll the virtue of being able to cycle the SMLE in front of your face making it the most inmportant thing a bolt-action rifle can do.

 

 

And how else than with the support hand are they to hold their torches going inot hte bunker? doesn't look modern to me in the 1917 trailer and who says that those old war movies did it right, that formed our ideas of how they did things back in the day?

 

 

It isn't old war movies that are the source of challenges to depictions of modern weapons carry, but contemporary manuals, and film and photos of soldiers in combat.  For that matter, I'm old enough to recall when that was not taught as standard.

 

As for the flashlight, it does seem to be being held rather than attached.  In that case, I have no serious objection.  I'm still a bit skeptical that junior ranks like them would just happen to have them in 1917, but not to suspension of disbelief level.


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#7211 R011

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 1016 AM

 

 

Some bits of modern handling are not as obviously modern as others. I also give a pass to the modern finger along the trigger guard positioning as a reasonable concession to safety and I am used to old movie conventions like HE rounds without fragments.

The SMLE assault rifle carry jarred my suspension of disbelief, though.

 

holding a rifle in a high ready has been a thing in hunting at least for a long time. makes more sense than holding it low and then to raise it when a target presents itself. then there are always smelly fans that extoll the virtue of being able to cycle the SMLE in front of your face making it the most inmportant thing a bolt-action rifle can do.

 

 

And how else than with the support hand are they to hold their torches going inot hte bunker? doesn't look modern to me in the 1917 trailer and who says that those old war movies did it right, that formed our ideas of how they did things back in the day?

 

 

It isn't old war movies that are the source of challenges to depictions of modern weapons carry, but contemporary manuals, and film and photos of soldiers in combat.  For that matter, I'm old enough to recall when that was not taught as standard.  It's also a lot easier to carry an M16 at that position than an FAL or WW2 era rifle.

 

As for the flashlight, it does seem to be being held rather than attached.  In that case, I have no serious objection.  I'm still a bit skeptical that junior ranks like them would just happen to have them in 1917, but not to suspension of disbelief level.

 


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#7212 TonyE

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 1106 AM

 

 

 

Just saw "In Which We Serve" produced in 1942 about a Royal Navy destroyer crew. Exceptionally well done. As an American, I was amazed on how fast the English accent could be spoken.

 

Its a lightly fictionalized telling of the life of HMS Kelly, warship of Lord Louis Mountbatten, with whom Noel Coward was best buddies. The scene at the end where he gives a talk to the survivors of the crew, many of the numbers were made up of sailors from a recent sinking by a U boat, whom happened to be at the port waiting for a new ship.

 

 

They even managed to borrow a captured Junkers Ju-88 from the RAF for the filming of the bombing scene, it was not the usual newsreel or combat footage inserted into the film.

 

 

Is that right? I wondered where it came from. Would this be the nightfighter that defected, that is now in Hendon?

 

 

Full story of this aircraft here:

https://wings-on-fil...ki/Werk_Nr_6073


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#7213 Stargrunt6

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 2201 PM

You could argue that depicting the modern corner-checking in an anachronistic setting adds tension.  Compare muzzle-first vs peering around the corner and decide which would make the heart rate go higher.  It's a case that sometimes reality doesn't feel real. :/


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#7214 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 08 October 2019 - 0218 AM

 

 

 

 

Just saw "In Which We Serve" produced in 1942 about a Royal Navy destroyer crew. Exceptionally well done. As an American, I was amazed on how fast the English accent could be spoken.

 

Its a lightly fictionalized telling of the life of HMS Kelly, warship of Lord Louis Mountbatten, with whom Noel Coward was best buddies. The scene at the end where he gives a talk to the survivors of the crew, many of the numbers were made up of sailors from a recent sinking by a U boat, whom happened to be at the port waiting for a new ship.

 

 

They even managed to borrow a captured Junkers Ju-88 from the RAF for the filming of the bombing scene, it was not the usual newsreel or combat footage inserted into the film.

 

 

Is that right? I wondered where it came from. Would this be the nightfighter that defected, that is now in Hendon?

 

 

Full story of this aircraft here:

https://wings-on-fil...ki/Werk_Nr_6073

 

 

Thats very interesting Tony, thank you.

 

I notice another Ju88 that landed by accident at RAF Lulsgate Bottom (which is todays Bristol Airport) was also in a Robert Donat Picture. There is an interesting picture of it here in Luftwaffe markings, with an RAF registration number and being started by an RAF trolly AC unit. :D

https://www.iwm.org....bject/205210729


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