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#41 Adam_S

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 1550 PM

Definitely not with their food. :P

 

Well, I for one have been living in Australia for the last 4 years and would gladly welcome a return to colonial status if it meant I could get a decent chicken tikka massala and a proper pint of bitter.


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#42 swerve

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 0722 AM

 

Definitely not with their food. :P

Whats wrong with faggots and chips? Haggis and Sprouts? Nice bit of black pudding and mushy peas? :)

 

I think the greatest insult is the profusion of Polish food shops we now have in the UK. Whats wrong with when in Rome? :D

 

Yeah. I can understand Indian restaurants & the like - but Polish food shops? Poland may have some great qualities, but cuisine ain't one of 'em.


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#43 Marek Tucan

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 1524 PM

Compared to Britain? :P Just try some nice borscht or bigos, or all kinds of pierogi...


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#44 Yama

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 1617 PM

Brexit's a great idea and I wholeheartedly support it. It's good for the EU, and good for UK alike. Everybody wins.

 

Cameron's posturing over Brexit has been most amusing. Sensing how the idea was popular, he sucked up voters being all stern and serious about it, then he negotiated a "great deal" and suddenly is all for staying in the EU.


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#45 swerve

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 1823 PM

Compared to Britain? :P Just try some nice borscht or bigos, or all kinds of pierogi...

Borscht? Wash your mouth out! And having eaten the stuff Poles sell as Polish food here, I'll stick to good old-fashioned British food such as dhansak or samosas.  :P


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#46 bojan

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 2258 PM

Smart guy said "No food worth of mention north of Danube". I tend to agree, with minor exceptions, mostly about sweets and deserts. :D


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#47 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 0213 AM

 

Compared to Britain? :P Just try some nice borscht or bigos, or all kinds of pierogi...

Borscht? Wash your mouth out! And having eaten the stuff Poles sell as Polish food here, I'll stick to good old-fashioned British food such as dhansak or samosas:P

 

Or Curry. :D


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#48 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 0220 AM

Brexit's a great idea and I wholeheartedly support it. It's good for the EU, and good for UK alike. Everybody wins.

 

Cameron's posturing over Brexit has been most amusing. Sensing how the idea was popular, he sucked up voters being all stern and serious about it, then he negotiated a "great deal" and suddenly is all for staying in the EU.

Its a bit more complicated than that. It was less to please the Conservative voters, than to please the Conservative back benchers whom were all threatening to jump ship to UKIP. By offering a referendum, he enabled them to stay on board, at least in the interim before the recent knife fights. Overlooking of course that the knives would come out before the referendum with the express idea of trying to get the party to get behind endorsing a Brexit. The recent move against the chancellor about disablity payments seems to have had that at the heart.

 

There is also the problem that the Conservatives have been putting a LOT of unpopular policies in their manifesto, in the logic that this particularly Government would be another coalition like the previous one. The logic was they could trade the slightly more barking policies against LIberal ones. What they didnt envisage was that the liberals would utterly collapse in the polls, and a lot of the more questionable policies (such as sunday trading or the sugar tax I believe was another) were pushed through (or in the case of sunday traded, tried to be push through) which in many cases caused some back bench discontent. its possible that the referendum was not quite the serious undertaking it appeared, and that they did intend to trade it with a Liberal party that never actually turned up as partners.

 

I doubt that most voters gave Brexit a thought at the polls. The real clincher is they didnt think Milliband was up to the job, and the Conservatives at the time looked as if they knew what they were doing. When the referendum happens, I wouldnt be surprised if the turnout is 30 percent at best. People are completely apathetic about it, or at least the ones I talk to are.


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#49 Ssnake

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 0312 AM

...and I suppose that's where the actual danger lies, that the Euroskeptics manage to mobilize more voters to cast a decision that the (silent) majority will eventually regret, but then the damage is done.


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#50 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 0328 AM

...and I suppose that's where the actual danger lies, that the Euroskeptics manage to mobilize more voters to cast a decision that the (silent) majority will eventually regret, but then the damage is done.

Exactly. Which is why we have at present the alarming spectacle of  Cameron trying to snuggle up to usual dialectic opposite in Jeremy Corbyn, to try and mobilise Labour voters to make up for any Conservative voters that will vote against. Which is hilarious TBH, not least because Corbyn has been a critic of the EU for years, and is only on board the pro Europe lobby because the Unions, that Cameron is trying to put out of business, told him to. :D

 

 

A case in point. My aunt is an ex nurse, who is strongly left leaning, like my father. At the last election she voted UKIP, because she feels strongly about immigration and wanted Farage to shake things up. She also thinks we ought to leave the EU. And that is someone naturally working class and left leaning. At that point you think it really comes down to whom motivates their people most, because what is going to settle the referendum is apathy. And by God, there is a lot of it in Britain at the moment if she is any guide.

 

I think its going to come down to a knife edge. Not in votes cast either way, but in whom turns out to vote in the first place. If it starts raining it might even come down to that.


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#51 JasonJ

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 0334 AM

Politicians really shouldn't use critical pillars in a way to gain an upper hand in negotiating or getting more votes because they risk undermining that critical pillar and crashing it down.

 

How ironically appropriate this episode is.

 


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#52 JasonJ

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 0344 AM

Really tight in February with a trend towards leaving. Just a poll though of course.

 

 

 

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#53 Ivanhoe

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 1236 PM



Smart guy said "No food worth of mention north of Danube". I tend to agree, with minor exceptions, mostly about sweets and deserts. :D

 

The British Isles have lots of good food, it just comes in a pint glass.

 

On the Brexit thing, not surprisingly the UKGB Blighty is experiencing the same reactionaryism as the rest of the western world. Folks from the working, and to some extent middle, classes are now cluing in (via the Interweb, mostly) that

a) political leadership sucks,

B) political leadership has been lying, is lying, continues to lie, and will lie repeatedly in the future,

c) the world sucks, and the culture and structures of home maybe aren't the problem, they are the solution.

 

What's stupid beyond belief is that the major political parties are still serving white-tie dinner long after the iceberg has gashed the bilges. The MSM and the establishment convinced themselves that the Tea Party movement was just a bunch of racist cranks. The Rs could have had a real conservative or libertarian for POTUS, or the Ds could have had a moderate with libertarian leanings, but they believed the tube rather than the actual people. So, Trump v Clinton. Kang v Kodos.

 

In Yurrup as well as the US, the concern should be about the government-after-next. If Britain elects an isolationist and brexits, what comes next? Cromwell? Or Salah ad-Din?


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#54 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 1319 PM

 



Smart guy said "No food worth of mention north of Danube". I tend to agree, with minor exceptions, mostly about sweets and deserts. :D

 

The British Isles have lots of good food, it just comes in a pint glass.

 

On the Brexit thing, not surprisingly the UKGB Blighty is experiencing the same reactionaryism as the rest of the western world. Folks from the working, and to some extent middle, classes are now cluing in (via the Interweb, mostly) that

a) political leadership sucks,

B) political leadership has been lying, is lying, continues to lie, and will lie repeatedly in the future,

c) the world sucks, and the culture and structures of home maybe aren't the problem, they are the solution.

 

What's stupid beyond belief is that the major political parties are still serving white-tie dinner long after the iceberg has gashed the bilges. The MSM and the establishment convinced themselves that the Tea Party movement was just a bunch of racist cranks. The Rs could have had a real conservative or libertarian for POTUS, or the Ds could have had a moderate with libertarian leanings, but they believed the tube rather than the actual people. So, Trump v Clinton. Kang v Kodos.

 

In Yurrup as well as the US, the concern should be about the government-after-next. If Britain elects an isolationist and brexits, what comes next? Cromwell? Or Salah ad-Din?

 

Yes I think so too. I think the same dissatisfaction that shaped teapartyism and Trump, are exactly the same kind of dissatisfaction that shaped the rise of UKIP, Brexit, and even (improbably) the rise of the first actually Socialist Leader in the Labour party in 25 years. :D

 

What do I think next? I think you will see the further rise of authoritarianism when removed from some of the restrictions (imperfect though they are) created by the European court of human rights, and a slow lingering death rattle as we slowly disappear up our own rectum and become a fascist utopia. Sans Scotland which will want independence so  the first chance they get can  get back into the EU.

 

 

Still, looking on the bright side, at least the torchlight parades through Whitehall will get the tourists in. :)


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#55 DB

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 1338 PM

I'm failing to see how the Conservative manifesto could have contained many terribly unpopular policies, given that the Tories were returned with an increased majority.

 

Blaming Labour's failures on Miliband, for all his ineptitude, misses the point that you claim Cameron is equally if not more incompetent. Still, there's plenty of cake, Stu. You can have it and eat it too.

 

I've yet to see any suggested policies coming out of Labour since the man in the bin-bag took over that didn't look moonbat crazy. Maybe that's the solution though, looking over at America and the 4 years of political suicide they're brewing for themselves.


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#56 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 1400 PM

Increased less by  the lefts defeat, than by smashing the liberals who supported their Conservative policies. Doesnt strike me as quite the endorsement it might have been DB.

 

Believe it or not (and im sure you wont)  I am increasingly politically agnostic. I absolutely accept every point you make about the British left. The problem is the critics of it seldom criticise the conservative right (or more accurately the increasingly carpet biting vitriolic  element of it) as increasingly dangerous to British liberty by their determination to stamp out any trace of leftism, push separatism from Europe and stamp on civil liberties we once took for granted. I would further relate, the increasing vitriol about immigration has emerged from them too. Even the PM has been caught doing it.

 

Because criticise the left, as you are totally right to do, Brexit did not emerge from them. It emerged from the  fringe of the conservative right that thinks that by emerging from the warm bubble of the EU, we are suddenly going to turn into a superpower again. Well, good luck to them. I just hope they have the good grace to fall on their sword when it all goes Pete Tong because, inevitably, it will. I note your good self does not disagree the leaving the EU is a bad idea. So why the hell are we even contemplating doing so? To please a very narrow group of right wingers who are so despised in their own party they dont even come close to power? Is there any other country in the world such a major change to a country could emerge from from such a small group of people?

 

There are no good ideas coming out of the left, I quite agree with you. Which is at least one of the reason why Im politically agnostic. I dont think there is actually a political party that suits how I feel about the country now. And I think truth be told, a hell of a lot of people feel the same way.

 

Never mind, when we get the one party state I daresay we wont have to worry about it. :)

 

 

(apologies for the above, I realise I inadvertently implied that you were part of the Brexit lobby. I realise this is not the case and have altered it to reflect it)


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 28 March 2016 - 0202 AM.

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#57 cbo

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 0208 AM

 

There's your problem right there. What Britain should be is America's north Atlantic aircraft carrier, and our source of affordable, literate acting talent. Anything more than that is just delusions of grandeur.

 

Seems like it will likely be Chinas North Atlantic aircraft carrier....


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#58 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 0254 AM

I for one welcome our Chinese overlords. :D


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#59 Chris Werb

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 0128 AM

Stuart, I just vote for the Liberals to keep the SNP out. If I was South I would vote for whichever party did me the least harm - or would have until Labour went loony left again.


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#60 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 0204 AM

And they will Chris, thats the problem. Its not so much Corbyn that scares me, its the Diane Abbots that surround him. Its like a Praetorian guard of idiots.

 

Id vote liberal too. If you couldn't comfortably fit the entire party in the back of a Transit van.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 04 April 2016 - 0207 AM.

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