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British Guided Bombs


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#1 Dawes

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 1019 AM

The Paveway family of guided bombs is used extensively by UK air forces, and has been for 30-odd years. Did the UK test/experiment with any other types of free-fall guided weapons before Paveway?


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#2 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 1015 AM

I cant immediately think of any. I think we bought Paveway kits off the peg. Though we did do our own laser designator's.

 

There was of course the Anglo French Martel Missile, which I believe was TV guided. You can see it partly in operation in this film.

 

https://en.wikipedia...artel_(missile)


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#3 Dawes

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 1353 PM

Until Paveway IV made it's appearance, Paveway II (using the UK 1000 pounder) was the principle British variant. From what I've seen, the wing assembly, forward adapter, control fins, and possibly the computer control group were modified to suit UK requirements. And of course the fuzing is different.


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#4 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 0313 AM

Yes that would be correct. So  It would have been more accurate for me to say they bought the modified package off the peg. :)

 

Im not quite sure when we got them. I do know ive seen a picture of a Vulcan carrying one at the time of the Falklands war, but it was not operationally used.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 21 January 2019 - 0313 AM.

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#5 Dawes

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 0920 AM

Didn't Harriers and/or Sea Harriers employ Paveway II at some point during the conflict? Possibly using ground-based designators?


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#6 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 0924 AM

Yeah, ive a vague memory of Harrier GR3's mounting them, but I cant swear to it. Id have to read up whether they used it or not. There certainly was an SAS team that was trained in laser designation techniques that was killed in a Sea King crash, I remember reading that set back their laser designation capabilities for a number of years. So it was certainly envisaged using them at some point.


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#7 Josh

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 2057 PM

I think the US rather pioneered guided bombs, so it wouldn't be super surprising for the RAF to buy/adopt from them. Honestly, who else in the timeframe of Paveway II/III even made guided free fall bombs?


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#8 Dawes

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 2122 PM

Matra (in France) developed a series of laser-guided bombs starting in the late 1970's (IIRC). I believe the operating principle was similar to Paveway. They were discontinued on cost grounds, apparently. US Paveway was cheaper to acquire. 


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#9 JWB

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 1258 PM

I think the US rather pioneered guided bombs, so it wouldn't be super surprising for the RAF to buy/adopt from them. Honestly, who else in the timeframe of Paveway II/III even made guided free fall bombs?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paveway

 

 


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