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Stokes Mortar Question


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#1 Chris Werb

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Posted 20 August 2017 - 1634 PM

How were Stokes mortar bombs stabilised? Assuming they were.



#2 bojan

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Posted 20 August 2017 - 2008 PM

They were not.



#3 Chris Werb

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 0219 AM

All-ways fuzed?



#4 bojan

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 0617 AM

Yes. It tumbled in the air explaining relatively short range for a wartime ammo. IIRC finned round was developed post WW1, about early 1920s by French.



#5 Chris Werb

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 1723 PM

Thank you Bojan.



#6 shep854

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 1843 PM

Looking at those bombs, pinpoint accuracy was apparently not in the specs...

From Wiki; 'Stokes Mortars'

WilfredStokeswithMortar.jpg



#7 Unreal John

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 0245 AM

By the end of the war there were both unstabilized and stabilized rounds.  Source below.

 

 

http://www.lexpev.nl...smortar1919.pdf


Edited by Unreal John, 23 August 2017 - 0250 AM.


#8 Markus Becker

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 0602 AM

Looking at those bombs, pinpoint accuracy was apparently not in the specs...
From Wiki; 'Stokes Mortars'
WilfredStokeswithMortar.jpg


OTOH, the maximum range range was so short that the relative inaccuracy didn't matter. Couple of hundred yards, not a few thousand like WW 2 mortars.

#9 shep854

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 0825 AM

 

Looking at those bombs, pinpoint accuracy was apparently not in the specs...
From Wiki; 'Stokes Mortars'
WilfredStokeswithMortar.jpg


OTOH, the maximum range range was so short that the relative inaccuracy didn't matter. Couple of hundred yards, not a few thousand like WW 2 mortars.

 

What I figured as well.  For the first effort, it was quick, cheap and good enough.


Edited by shep854, 23 August 2017 - 0826 AM.


#10 bojan

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 1235 PM

Post-ww1 ammo gave it more range, up the 2200-2300m.



#11 Chris Werb

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 1433 PM

 

 

Looking at those bombs, pinpoint accuracy was apparently not in the specs...
From Wiki; 'Stokes Mortars'
WilfredStokeswithMortar.jpg


OTOH, the maximum range range was so short that the relative inaccuracy didn't matter. Couple of hundred yards, not a few thousand like WW 2 mortars.

 

What I figured as well.  For the first effort, it was quick, cheap and good enough.

 

 

One of the most successful and long-lasting weapon inventions of the last hundred years.



#12 Markus Becker

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 1622 PM

Post-ww1 ammo gave it more range, up the 2200-2300m.


But as you said finn stabilized. And accurate at the new max range I presume.

#13 Colin

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 2247 PM

How did the later Stokes compare to the French Brandet mortars?



#14 lastdingo

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 0353 AM

A centre of gravity ahead of the geometrical centre is providing a weak stabilisation.



#15 bojan

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 0455 AM

How did the later Stokes compare to the French Brandet mortars?

Less range (Brandt started with 1900m range and ended with something like 2800m, US and Soviet copies reached slightly more than 3000).  Brandt 1927/1931 was a further development (Brandt bought Stokes patent). Every mortar in the world is a child of Brandt design, hence grandchild of Stokes, so as a Chris said it was a very, very influential weapon.


Edited by bojan, 24 August 2017 - 0502 AM.


#16 lastdingo

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 1246 PM

Interestingly, some of the ancient bronze mortars as known from the era of Vauban already were used during WWI by the desperate French.

The light mortar of old handed over its role to the modern infantry mortar during the war that almost broke Europe.



#17 bojan

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 1457 PM

Not just French. Russians used Kegorn mortars model 1836 and 1847.






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