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Protest's In Hong Kong


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#121 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 0930 AM

 

Thank you Sunday. Its been an eventful month to put it mildly.

 

As said before, no parts of Hong Kong were abandoned. It would have been impossible to hold onto half a city when the Communists owned ALL the reservoirs. To keep Hong Kong, we would have had to keep regularly importing icebergs. Besides, splitting cities never works very well. Ask a Berliner.

 

As for Gibraltar, its pretty clear the Blair Government were willing to throw Gibraltar under the bus to get support from Spain on various issues in the EU. That only ended when the leadership of Spain changed. All looks a bit short sighted now, but that was our Tony for you.

 

Seems you are stating that yes, that half of a city was abandoned because of lack of infrastructures.

You know, there is a thing called Civil Engineering that comprises reservoir building, and there other things called desalination plants, and there was time to prepare a division. HK also, probably earnt HM Government a pretty shilling or two, and not all of them because the export of opium.

Probably, the average HKer would have received UK citizenship with more advantage than most UK residents originating from the Indian subcontinent, Mayor of London included.

 

 

Where you going to put them? Hong Kong is already built on, and the bits that arent are small mountains. None of these are great options for reservoirs. Also, Britain in 1984 was broke. Where was all this money for investing in a colony going to come from, when we could barely invest in the rest of Britain?

 

You only have to look at the wiki entry to see the reason why.

 

https://en.wikipedia...New_Territories

As the expiry date of the lease neared in the 1980s, talks between the United Kingdom and the People's Republic of China led to the signing of the Sino-British Joint Declaration (1984), in which the whole of Hong Kong would be returned, instead of only the New Territories. This is because Hong Kong's shipping ports, reservoirs and other vital installations were all in the New Territories. Had only the New Territories been returned to China, it would also have been difficult to accommodate those New Territories residents moving to the Kowloon Peninsula and Hong Kong Island.

 

 

So you end up with a colony without water or ports. It makes the Northern Ireland Brexit problem look straightforward.


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#122 sunday

sunday

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 1134 AM

Note that the talks did not include directly the people of HK. That is different from Gibraltar. Anyway, seems one part of the Sino-British Joint Declaration considers it is now void:

 

In July 2017, when British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson urged democratic progress in Hong Kong,[26][27] China's foreign ministry spokesman Lu Kang said the legally binding Hong Kong handover treaty with Britain 'as a historical document, no longer has any practical significance,' and that 'It is not at all binding for the central government's management over Hong Kong. The UK has no sovereignty, no power to rule and no power to supervise Hong Kong after the handover.'[28][29][30][31][32] In response the British Foreign office said: "It is a legally binding treaty, registered with the UN and continues to be in force. As a co-signatory, the UK government is committed to monitoring its implementation closely." Johnson restated Britain's commitment to Hong Kong is enshrined in the "treaty" that was "just as strong today" as it was 20 years ago.[29][32]

 
 
Also this:
 

Lu told reporters during a regular briefing on Friday that the document no longer binds China.

“Now Hong Kong has returned to the motherland’s embrace for 20 years, the Sino-British Joint Declaration, as a historical document, no longer has any practical significance, and it is not at all binding for the central government’s management over Hong Kong. The UK has no sovereignty, no power to rule and no power to supervise Hong Kong after the handover,” Lu said.


This looks the kind of bullying we use to see when describing the operations of certain Western powers in the middle of the 19th century...

Perhaps it is time to begin repatriation of HKers...


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#123 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 1353 PM

Id be happy to have them. I like Chinese food.


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