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Because The United Kingdom?


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#4221 DB

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 0435 AM

This could have been in the topic about mad leftists, but it's crap UK legislation and how it's weaponised by mad people.

https://www.bbc.co.u...siness-49332640
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#4222 Panzermann

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 0528 AM

How did these laws ever pass parliament?  :wacko:​ 

 

They are malleable like clay."harmful gender stereotypes" and "serious or widespread offence" can be anything.

 

 

 

I just grabbed for convenience. You will note they are still part of the Commonwealth, and they are quoting the Telegraph.

 
I like to look over the hindustan Times webpage from time to time too. They actually write good english. Wasn't it the english newspaper read by colonial officials in india?


Edited by Panzermann, 14 August 2019 - 0531 AM.

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#4223 DB

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 0822 AM

The Indian papers tend to write in a style that went out of fashion in the UK news media about 30 years ago. Coincident, I think, with easier access to writing analysis tools which estimated reading comprehension ages.

"If it's double digits, then dumb it down".

Edited by DB, 14 August 2019 - 0822 AM.

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#4224 Harold Jones

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 1543 PM

This could have been in the topic about mad leftists, but it's crap UK legislation and how it's weaponised by mad people.

https://www.bbc.co.u...siness-49332640

Crazy, so what happens if the add is two women who leave the baby on the conveyor belt?  I assume a few dozen people complain about the add reinforcing the stereotype that women are the primary care givers and it gets pulled.  Eventually your adds are going to be scrolling text read by an announcer of indeterminate sex and a picture of the product.


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#4225 DB

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 1547 PM

Those would be discriminatory against people who can't read, are deaf and may be colour blind.

 

Or something, anything.

 

In the end, satire simply can't compete.


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#4226 Harold Jones

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 1754 PM

I'm imagining what this will mean for movies and TV shows in what I'm afraid is going to turn out to be the very near future.


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#4227 Mr King

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Posted 16 August 2019 - 1148 AM

lT91mcK.jpg


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#4228 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 16 August 2019 - 1432 PM

Just as applicable to parts of the West country. I can speak to the obesity from knowledge.
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#4229 Adam_S

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 0205 AM

Just as applicable to parts of the West country. I can speak to the obesity from knowledge.

 

The Trouble and Strife has family from the North East of England and I can confirm the accuracy of that picture.


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#4230 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 0215 AM

I do find it funny hearing the American posters on here, you would think industrial decay is a new phenomenon. We got there first in the 1970's.

 

Where I live, the high street at Gloucester has a mixture of cash converters and betting shops. Everything else is leaving.


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#4231 Briganza

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 0306 AM

No charity shops? No estate agents? You are up market. My next door 3 bed semi just sold for 150k.

 

My council has got rid of parking charges to encourage people into town. It seems to work as the car parks are full and people are in town. One of the side effects is that the 30min/1 hour parking slots are always available so if you are just nipping in to the bank you can get a spot.

 

Industrial rundown was going on long before the 70s as technology moved on. In one village nearby they have still got 5 windmills (out of use) and a railway that was built around 1860s and closed to traffic in 1960s.

 

Ermine St comes to an end at the Humber not far from me and things have been going downhill ever since.


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#4232 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 0311 AM

No charity shops? No estate agents? You are up market. My next door 3 bed semi just sold for 150k.

 

My council has got rid of parking charges to encourage people into town. It seems to work as the car parks are full and people are in town. One of the side effects is that the 30min/1 hour parking slots are always available so if you are just nipping in to the bank you can get a spot.

 

Industrial rundown was going on long before the 70s as technology moved on. In one village nearby they have still got 5 windmills (out of use) and a railway that was built around 1860s and closed to traffic in 1960s.

 

Ermine St comes to an end at the Humber not far from me and things have been going downhill ever since.

 

That is a fair point actually. Macmillan was witnessing a down turn in the economy  as early as the late 50's, though it didnt stop him saying 'You have never had it so good'. Nobody would have dared say anything like that by the late 1970's.

 

Windmills are very in at the moment, dont put money against someone not putting those back into service.


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#4233 Briganza

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 0347 AM

 

No charity shops? No estate agents? You are up market. My next door 3 bed semi just sold for 150k.

 

My council has got rid of parking charges to encourage people into town. It seems to work as the car parks are full and people are in town. One of the side effects is that the 30min/1 hour parking slots are always available so if you are just nipping in to the bank you can get a spot.

 

Industrial rundown was going on long before the 70s as technology moved on. In one village nearby they have still got 5 windmills (out of use) and a railway that was built around 1860s and closed to traffic in 1960s.

 

Ermine St comes to an end at the Humber not far from me and things have been going downhill ever since.

 

That is a fair point actually. Macmillan was witnessing a down turn in the economy  as early as the late 50's, though it didnt stop him saying 'You have never had it so good'. Nobody would have dared say anything like that by the late 1970's.

 

Windmills are very in at the moment, dont put money against someone not putting those back into service.

 

As I read that and got to Macmillan the mind went to the charity shop and had they seen a downturn in the quality of tat.  :D​

 

 No room we have wall to wall wind farms (and unlike many I quite like the look of and think they should be painted in bright colours, pink, orange, bright red.). We do have one working mill but I think the volunteer got killed playing with the machinery. Long cloths and moving cogs don't work well together.


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#4234 Panzermann

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 0717 AM

I do find it funny hearing the American posters on here, you would think industrial decay is a new phenomenon. We got there first in the 1970's.

 

Where I live, the high street at Gloucester has a mixture of cash converters and betting shops. Everything else is leaving.

 

You know, you drop off the edge of the world when you move outside the continental USA. There be dragons. ;)

 

 

From industrialisation so far, after some time all early industrial areas are run down, economic activity moves elswhere either abroad or just wihtin the country. As the UK was the first country to industrialise, they are the first to feel  dissolving industries. now you have the rust belt in the USA, the rhine-ruhr area is also devoid of much of heavy indutry etc. In half a century those million cities built quickly in China will be ghost towns. Seems to be the normal course of things.


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#4235 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 0936 AM

I do find it funny hearing the American posters on here, you would think industrial decay is a new phenomenon. We got there first in the 1970's.
 
Where I live, the high street at Gloucester has a mixture of cash converters and betting shops. Everything else is leaving.

 
You know, you drop off the edge of the world when you move outside the continental USA. There be dragons. ;)
 
 
From industrialisation so far, after some time all early industrial areas are run down, economic activity moves elswhere either abroad or just wihtin the country. As the UK was the first country to industrialise, they are the first to feel  dissolving industries. now you have the rust belt in the USA, the rhine-ruhr area is also devoid of much of heavy indutry etc. In half a century those million cities built quickly in China will be ghost towns. Seems to be the normal course of things.

It's hit Germany too? I'm sorry to hear that.

Where I live there were a number of world leading industries. I won't bore you with a list, but one had a motorway built through the middle of it, one is a car park, and 2 others were turned into shopping outlets.
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#4236 Ssnake

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 1000 AM

We've tried to "manage" it, but if you want to see the effect, travel to Gelsenkirchen. Admittedly, Gelsenkirchen would probably be the worst example. But then there's also the Saar area, and East Germany. Usually however UK industrial decay looks more Lovecraftian than German industrial decay, for what it's worth, whereas East German examples occasionally have a vibe of post soviet industrial decay, and we all know that Soviet style is bestest style.


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#4237 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 1038 AM

Last year I had to build a route set in manchester, an update of a route we previously built set in the 1950s. I had to level dozens of factories, and replace them with weeds and car parks.

It all came entirely naturally. Its what I grew up with.

https://m.youtube.co...h?v=n_u0SGOLDMI

Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 17 August 2019 - 1038 AM.

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#4238 JWB

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 1515 PM

The late 1970s was a time of malaise for most of the anglosphere.


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#4239 DB

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 1605 PM

I remember geography lessons discussing the evolutionary cycle of urban areas. That was in the 70s and covered the death of the centre due to pricing out communities, ribbon development on access roads, sprawl, malls, regeneration. The is nothing new here. You can also look at for example the development ofmetroland to drain the rookeries, and so on.
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#4240 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 0136 AM

Its perfectly true that as far as London is concerned, its cyclical. I remember watching the history of Londons streets on BBC2, and its clear some affluent areas became slums, then back again to affluent in the 1980s. A good example is Notting Hill.

 

The problem is, Im not aware the rest of the country really works the same way. When I see parts of regency Cheltenham starting to look like slums, and the desitute living on the streets in the city centre, then something has changed. It never looked that way before in its history, and the massive influx of drugs from the West Midlands is part of the problem.

 

Its perfectly true there are new developments in some of these cities. For example, the city of Birmingham last time i visited has a glittering hub you could see from as far away as Tyseley. Its still left  the rest of Birmingham looking like the burned out hulk it was in the late 1970's. Nothing much has changed.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 18 August 2019 - 0202 AM.

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