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Lady Lex Rediscovered Off Of Australia


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#61 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 0256 AM

 

I seem to recall they had studied Taranto and this formed the basis for Midway. But im not aware there was any British torpedo changes that enabled us to do it. I think the stringbag was so slow they could probably drop them in a puddle. :)

You mean Pearl Harbor?

 

 

Indeed I did, brain fart on my part.

 

 

 

:D

I noticed Osprey have a new book out on Taranto, it looks really good actually.

 

 

Have you ever read this book Stewart? I used to visit Keston ponds, where Bywater fought battles with miniature warships, as a kid when staying at my brothers MQ at RAF Biggin Hill

 

 

Yes I did, its pretty damn good isnt it?


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#62 Jeff

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 1412 PM

Poor luck Lex got.

 

I the idea of filling fuel lines with inert gas (CO2 I think) when not in use had caught earlier. Lady Lex would have probably survived Coral Sea.

 

ISTR that the fires were pretty much under control when the order was given to turn on the ventilation system to clear the fumes. This moved the gas fumes around until they found an ignition source and BOOM! She was done for at that point.  :(

 

From her log, nothing definitive but...

 

1200 Steaming as before . . . at 20 knots. Both elevators out of commission in up position.  List all removed from ship by shifting fluids.
1230 [O]pened vents necessary for ventilation and turned into wind.
1235 [A]ll fires below decks reported out.
1243 [C]ommenced launching combat patrol.
1247 [H]eavy explosion felt which vented up forward bomb elevator. Lost communication with central station.


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#63 shep854

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 1514 PM

 

Poor luck Lex got.

 

I the idea of filling fuel lines with inert gas (CO2 I think) when not in use had caught earlier. Lady Lex would have probably survived Coral Sea.

 

ISTR that the fires were pretty much under control when the order was given to turn on the ventilation system to clear the fumes. This moved the gas fumes around until they found an ignition source and BOOM! She was done for at that point.  :(

 

From her log, nothing definitive but...

 

1200 Steaming as before . . . at 20 knots. Both elevators out of commission in up position.  List all removed from ship by shifting fluids.
1230 [O]pened vents necessary for ventilation and turned into wind.
1235 [A]ll fires below decks reported out.
1243 [C]ommenced launching combat patrol.
1247 [H]eavy explosion felt which vented up forward bomb elevator. Lost communication with central station.

 

:( :( :(   That had to be a heartbreaker... :mellow:


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#64 Jeff

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 0925 AM

 

 

Poor luck Lex got.

 

I the idea of filling fuel lines with inert gas (CO2 I think) when not in use had caught earlier. Lady Lex would have probably survived Coral Sea.

 

ISTR that the fires were pretty much under control when the order was given to turn on the ventilation system to clear the fumes. This moved the gas fumes around until they found an ignition source and BOOM! She was done for at that point.  :(

 

From her log, nothing definitive but...

 

1200 Steaming as before . . . at 20 knots. Both elevators out of commission in up position.  List all removed from ship by shifting fluids.
1230 [O]pened vents necessary for ventilation and turned into wind.
1235 [A]ll fires below decks reported out.
1243 [C]ommenced launching combat patrol.
1247 [H]eavy explosion felt which vented up forward bomb elevator. Lost communication with central station.

 

:( :( :(   That had to be a heartbreaker... :mellow:

 

That's what they mean when they talk about hard earned lessons. Design and damage control procedures improved dramatically so at least the lessons were taken to heart.


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#65 shep854

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 1804 PM

Some lessons cannot be learned in peacetime.


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#66 TOW-2

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 1848 PM

I hate to go all "America, F- yeah!" but due to WW2 and the catastrophic fires on carriers in Vietnam, the US Navy has pretty much perfected damage control and firefighting capability on carriers and I would wager on most ships; witness the USS Stark and the USS Cole both surviving some very serious damage.


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#67 shep854

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Posted 18 March 2018 - 2043 PM

Dont forget Kennedy and Balknap; aluminum superstructure doesnt do fire well at all. :/
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#68 Chris Werb

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 1700 PM

I hate to go all "America, F- yeah!" but due to WW2 and the catastrophic fires on carriers in Vietnam, the US Navy has pretty much perfected damage control and firefighting capability on carriers and I would wager on most ships; witness the USS Stark and the USS Cole both surviving some very serious damage.

 

And the successful efforts in the aftermath of the USS Fitzgerald collision proved it once more. 


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#69 TOW-2

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Posted 19 March 2018 - 2043 PM

 

I hate to go all "America, F- yeah!" but due to WW2 and the catastrophic fires on carriers in Vietnam, the US Navy has pretty much perfected damage control and firefighting capability on carriers and I would wager on most ships; witness the USS Stark and the USS Cole both surviving some very serious damage.

 

And the successful efforts in the aftermath of the USS Fitzgerald collision proved it once more. 

 

 

Oh yeah, definitely.


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#70 Ken Estes

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Posted 20 March 2018 - 1255 PM

https://maritime.org/doc/dc/index.htm

 

cover.jpg​

 

 

HANDBOOK OF DAMAGE CONTROL

Original manuscript by staff members of the Naval Damage Control Training Center, Philadelphia, with the assistance of the Bureau of Ships and the Naval Training School (Damage Control, San Francisco.

Produced by Standards and Curriculum Division, Training, Bureau of Personnel, for the Chief of Naval Operations. Illustrations prepared at Training Aids Development Center, New York, N. Y.

NavPers 16191

May, 1945

 
ii
 

PREFACE

The Handbook of Damage Control was written by the staff of the Naval Damage Control Training Center, Philadelphia, with the aid of the Bureau of Ships and the Naval Training School (Damage Control), San Francisco, and was produced by Training, Bureau of Naval Personnel, for the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet.

Since the first days of World War II, the great importance of damage control has been clearly perceived. Given effective damage control, ships have been kept in action or have returned to port; without it, many of these ships would have been destroyed.

This volume represents the accumulated damage control experiences of the present war. It is intended to serve as a textbook in damage control schools and to provide a ready source of information and guidance for the Forces Afloat.

C. M. COOKE, Jr.
Chief of Staff.

 
iii
 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  Page Introduction 1 Chapter I, Resistance to Damage 10 Chapter II, Basic Principles of Mathematics and Mechanics 20 Chapter III, Fundamentals of Buoyancy and Transverse Stability 27 Chapter IV, Stability Characteristics 37 Chapter V, The Inclining Experiment 47 Chapter VI, Weight Shifts and Transverse Stability 49 Chapter VII, Weight Changes and Transverse Stability 58 Chapter VIII, The Effects of Loose Water 65 Chapter IX, Stability Data for Standard Conditions of Loading 76 Chapter X, Longitudinal Stability and the Effects of Trim 86 Chapter XI, Curves of Form 94 Chapter XII, The General Stability Diagram 99 Chapter XIII, Impaired Stability 105 Chapter XIV, List 124 Chapter XV, Underwater Explosions 132 Chapter XVI, Hull Strength 141 Chapter XVII, Estimate of the Damaged Ship's Situation 146 Chapter XVIII, Corrective Measures Available 151 Chapter XIX, Restoring Seaworthiness 157 Chapter XX, Stranding 162 Chapter XXI, Preparations to Resist Damage 163 Chapter XXII, Damage-Control Organization 169 Chapter XXIII, Damage-Control Organization, Cont'd 175 Chapter XXIV, The Repair Party 181 Chapter XXV, The Medical Department 185 Chapter XXVI, Damage-Control Education and Training 189 Chapter XXVII, Training of the Repair Party 197 Chapter XXVIII, Damage-Control Communications 200 Chapter XXIX, Hull Piping Systems 207 Chapter XXX, Material Upkeep and Damage Control 221 Chapter XXXI, Reduction of Fire Hazards 231 Chapter XXXII, Fire Fighting 237 Chapter XXXIII, Investigating Damage 245 Chapter XXXIV, Repairing Damage in Action 250 Chapter XXXV, Repair Party Equipment 275 Chapter XXXVI, Shoring 282 Chapter XXXVII, The Use of Concrete in Repairing Hull Damage 317 Chapter XXXVIII, The Engineer Department and Damage Control 321 Chapter XXXIX, Repair of Engineering Damage 330 Appendix A, Check Inclining Experiment 334 Appendix B, Symbols 338 Index 339

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