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#1 Nikolas93TS

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Posted 24 July 2019 - 1901 PM

Could something similar to this be in AIFV / YPR-765? 

 

Patent say:

An envelope or panel member having formed therein a plurality of angled holding slots adopted to loosely support armor elements disposed in the designated holding slots. Air space areas within the envelope can be sealed or filled with plastic, or the like, depending on need for buoyancy to overall vehicle design. In this developed form, a complete panel or envelope is ready for application to the side of an armored vehicle.

US3765299-drawings-page-2.png

Would something like this give at least some form of protection against HEAT?


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#2 Interlinked

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Posted 24 July 2019 - 2005 PM

As far as I know (and I admit I'm not very knowledgeable on this particular subject), this is exactly what was used on the AIFV. It won't stop an RPG except maybe at unusual angles of attack, but it should at least reduce the beyond-armour effect. The Soviets found that even a simple spaced steel plate could improve the survivability of BTRs and BMPs from RPG fire in Afghanistan.
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#3 bojan

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 0554 AM

Pretty much the same stuff that is in Warrior ad-on armor.


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#4 methos

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 1343 PM

Doubtful that the armour of the AIFV looks like that. It is designed with amphibious capability, so the hollow space between the aluminium hull and the add-on steel plates is likely completely filled with foamed polymeres - otherwise a single hit from a rifle could result in the AIFV sinking.


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#5 Nikolas93TS

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 1552 PM

That is what patent say. If nothing was changed, angled armour inserts likely should be high hardness steel (500-600 Brinell), held by aluminium structure and hollow space filled with polyurethane foam for extra buoyancy.

 

Italians opted for simple 6mm high hardness steel applique on their VCC-1, which meant it lost amphibious capability. I wouldn't be surprised if armour inserts on AIFV are of similar or even same thickness.

 

What kind of protection would an armour like this provide? vs. 12.7mm and possibly even 14.5mm at longer range?


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#6 methos

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Posted 26 July 2019 - 0701 AM

The AIFV doesn't seem to use the same type of armour as described in the patent:

 

ry1bo22oi9z01.jpg?width=1024&auto=webp&s

Turkish ACV-15 (licence-built AIFV). The side armour seems to be two thin steel plates placed parallel to the aluminium side walls of the vehicle. Hardly surprising, given that the Bradley had similar side armour.

 

Can it stop 14.5 mm AP? Supposedly yes, this was stated in front of the US Congress when the Bradley was being developed and the AIFV was considered as alternative - but the range and safe maneuvering angles are not known. The armour described in the patent also might be sufficient to stop 14.5 mm AP rounds - but it depends on multiple factors armour thickness, impact angle and distance. Without knowing the actual armour thickness (& efficiency), we can only speculate.


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#7 Nikolas93TS

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 1825 PM

Polyurethane foam would provide only buoyancy? As some liquids (e.s. diesel) are effective, in relation to their mass, in resisting the penetration of shaped charge jets, I wonder about the effect of polyurethane, albeit it doesn't seem to be that thick.


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