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Guess The Japanese Are Getting Serious


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#61 swerve

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 1743 PM

How big is the warhead on that ASM? The missile itself looks small like a AA missile.

It's about 900 kg. An AMRAAM is about 150kg.

 

 

 

BTW, the Japanese MoD TRDI says it has an integral rocket-ramjet, not turbojet. Presumably that's the source for Japanese Wiki. Jason must be right that the turbojet reference is wrong, probably a translation error.


Edited by swerve, 15 November 2015 - 1746 PM.

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#62 JasonJ

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Posted 15 November 2015 - 2304 PM

Just to clearly indicate where the article mistakenly says turbojet.

 

kkkjkihjhjghjf.jpg

 

In the underline part is:

 

ロケットとターボジェット

 

Which means "rocket and turbojet"

 

The whole sentence it is in: ロケットとターボジェットを組み合わせた「インテグラル・ロケット・ラムジェットエンジン」を搭載し、従来の空対艦ミサイルより推進速度が速いのが特徴。

 

Which means: The "Integral Rocket Ramjet" that combines a rocket and turbojet is loaded on and features a propulsion speed greater than previous air anti-ship missiles.

 

The article made the mistake by using ターボジェット (Turbojet) instead of using ラムジェット (Ramjet) in the short description. This is despite the fact that the word "ramjet" is part of the actual name of the propulsion giving in the quotation 「インテグラル・ロケット・ラムジェットエンジン」.

 

Japanese quotations are 「」 so 「blah blah blah」 means "blah blah blah"

 

Whoever wrote the article probably doesn't know anything about aircraft engine types :lol: or maybe by just the slip of their finger typed turbo instead of ram without thinking.


Edited by JasonJ, 15 November 2015 - 2311 PM.

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#63 DB

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 1647 PM

I seem to recall that the US had developed (prototype) "rocket ramjets" where the ramjet internals were filled with solid rocket fuel to act as a boost phase, then switching to ramjet thereafter (with presumably a liquid injected fuel). Might have been in the context of either 120mm ramjet boosted rounds or maybe one of the proposed hypersonic ATGM designs that was all the rage 10 years ago or so.


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#64 Josh

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 1651 PM

Also the ASALM or whever that Reagan era cruise missile was. Don't the Russians have some ramjets that work that way? But in any case that sounds like the mechanism of this weapon.


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#65 swerve

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 1840 PM

Didn't the Soviet 3M9 (?) missile for the SA-6 system do that?


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#66 JasonJ

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Posted 22 November 2015 - 0804 AM

The beginnings of Japanese counter-terrorism intelligence.

 

KUALA LUMPUR – As Japan gears up to host a key summit next year, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Sunday that the government will set up a new intelligence gathering unit on terrorism as early as next month.

“Ahead of the Ise-Shima summit, we will boost our counterterrorism measures and bolstering intelligence gathering with the international community is a pressing issue. For this end, we will create a new intelligence gathering unit,” Abe said at a news conference after wrapping up a series of regional summits in the Malaysian capital, Kuala Lumpur.

Abe’s remarks come as the international community is putting up a united front to combat terrorism in the wake of the Nov. 13 attacks in Paris, which left 130 people dead.

Next year’s Group of Seven summit, which will bring together the leaders of Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States, will be held in May in Mie Prefecture.

A government source said Friday that Tokyo is arranging for the Foreign Ministry’s new intelligence gathering unit on terrorist activities to have four overseas bases — in Amman, Cairo, Jakarta and New Delhi.

The government plans to assign staff from the foreign and defense ministries and the National Police Agency with regional expertise and fluency in local languages to the overseas offices, according to the source.

Intelligence teams will be set up at the Japanese embassies in those cities, with the unit’s members given the status of diplomat. The move is also aimed at enhancing cooperation with foreign intelligence agencies.

 

 

http://www.japantime...e/#.VlG8eL8XXKA


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#67 zaarin7

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 0227 AM

I'm quite sure there personnel will have no problem blending in with the locals in Amman, Cairo and New Delhi unless they pose as turists.


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#68 JasonJ

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 1047 AM

plnjhggf.jpg

 

 

Plans for stationing JGSDF on Nansei Islands.

 

 

奄美大島

Amami Oshima: 550 personnel. By 2018.

 

宮古島

Miyakojima: 700-800 personnel. By 2018.

 

石垣島

Ishigakishima: 500-600 personnel. By 2019.

 

These three include civil disturbance unit, anti-ship missile unit, and SAM unit.

 

与那国島

Yonagunijima: 150 personnel. By the end of 2015. Coastal Surveillance unit.


Edited by JasonJ, 02 December 2015 - 1122 AM.

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#69 Panzermann

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 1223 PM

What is written next to the circle shaped marking north of Ishigakishima and Yonagnijima?
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#70 JasonJ

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 2212 PM

What is written next to the circle shaped marking north of Ishigakishima and Yonagnijima?


That would be the Senkaku islands. I'll give all 5 in position of the map.


China..............................East China Sea

Taiwan........Senkaku islands.......Okinawa main island

Edited by JasonJ, 02 December 2015 - 2234 PM.

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#71 Panzermann

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 0819 AM

Thanks.

Makes sense to mark this contested island.


I had recognized the symbol for China. Okay the rectangle with vertical line through the middle is easy to recognize. :)
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#72 JasonJ

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 0904 AM

Thanks.

Makes sense to mark this contested island.


I had recognized the symbol for China. Okay the rectangle with vertical line through the middle is easy to recognize. :)

 

It's a start :)  :lol: 

 

中 Generally means middle. 国 means country, and there it is, the "Central Kingdom" name.

 

Some other examples..

 

韓国 South Korea

米国 United States

独国 Germany

 

However, the names of most countries are regularly not used in this way but with the katakana alphabet (Japanese has 3 alphabets), especially in conversation. So in the katakana alphabet, a couple of examples.

 

アメリカ United States

トイツ Germany

 

China and South Korea don't have a common katakana name, most likely because of their long historical existence in proximity to Japan. Katakana is often used for foreign words and generally stay close to the original pronunciation of the borrowed word. The first three examples above the katakana examples are in Kanji and are not borrowed words but are Japanese-language-made words for those countries. Newspapers and academic books generally use the kanji way, one reason probably is because it is shorter. To help illustrate the difference between katakana in the above examples, note the very different pronunciations.

 

United States:

米国 beikoku

アメリカ amerika

 

Germany:

独国 dokukoku (doh ku koh ku) I added the h to prevent a pronunciation reading similar to the English "to".

トイツ doitsu

 

So for conversation, use ドイツ and for writing thesis papers, reports, etc, often 独国 will be the more suitable one to use.


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#73 Panzermann

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 0930 AM

Thank you. I will remember that when I write my next doctor thesis in japanese. ;)

doitsu is much kawaii.


I always had a bit japanophilia going, but never enough to actually tackle learning the language. Well when I stay o. tank net you are going to rub off on me.

a japanese exchange student explained to me that maga are much better in japanese original because they play with the writing all the time. Like an old guy only talking in kanji, because he was so old fashioned and such. And a wild mix across all three (well four if you count latin alphabet, romaji) is often used as well. Carrying meaning.


I read that famous Musashi was born as Takezo and he started to read his name backwards. Is that true?
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#74 JasonJ

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 1002 AM

Thank you. I will remember that when I write my next doctor thesis in japanese. ;)

doitsu is much kawaii.


I always had a bit japanophilia going, but never enough to actually tackle learning the language. Well when I stay o. tank net you are going to rub off on me.

a japanese exchange student explained to me that maga are much better in japanese original because they play with the writing all the time. Like an old guy only talking in kanji, because he was so old fashioned and such. And a wild mix across all three (well four if you count latin alphabet, romaji) is often used as well. Carrying meaning.


I read that famous Musashi was born as Takezo and he started to read his name backwards. Is that true?

 

:lol: no problem.

 

Musashi, you got me on something I don't know that I probably should know. Well granted there's a lot to know about any country so I'll claim innocent for being unable to answer your question. Although a quick look at his wiki, and seeing he was a samurai in the 1600s, it wouldn't surprise me. People back then changed their name many times.

 

I'd have to agree with the exchange student that you have exchanged words with. The way of using one's language as part of the communication experience can't be translated. And yeah, romaji adds a 4th alphabet.

 

I have been a bit of a Japanophile myself before embarking on actually learning the language. Something resonates. It's hard to clarify the origin of it. But strange enough, my Japanese learning was actually born out of my own initiative to learn Korean. After about 2-3 months of studying Korean. The Korean learning took a back seat to the Japanese learning although the Korean learning was never abandoned and I still study it.

 

The one regrettable thing to my focus on East Asia, and consequently, putting time into learning those languages, is that it puts German learning on the side. My junior high school and high school only offered Spanish, Italian, and French. If there was German, I would have done that hands down. I took Spanish and wasn't motivated at the time which was a waste. Today I could have made much better use out of the time in those Spanish classes. But anyway, I try to squeeze in German once in a while, and little by little, it'll develop, just that the piecemeal activity needs a long enough timescale. TN helps with that :D


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#75 patteng

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 0024 AM


 国 - I have noticed this before, but what's the history and general practice behind the Japanese adoption of the simplified Chinese characters?


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#76 JasonJ

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 0059 AM

国 - I have noticed this before, but what's the history and general practice behind the Japanese adoption of the simplified Chinese characters?

 

Comparing reading stuff from the WW1 and WW2 era, and stuff from post-war, the Japanese language was altered a little. Some material before post-war were written horizontally from right to left. And some Kanji (Chinese characters) were simplified. Some of the simplified Japanese Kanji are the same as simplified Mandarin but some are different either by only the Mandarin kanji getting simplified or both getting simplified differently. Here's an example where former Japanese, present Japanese, and simplified Chinese are all different.

The first character in the word Kanji 漢字.

Former Japanese:
Present Japanese:
Simplified Chinese:

 

 

And another lone character, which generally means "produce"

 

Former Japanese:

Present Japanese:

Simplified Chinese:

 

One more example, this one alone generally means "sense"

 

 

Former Japanese:

Present Japanese:

Simplified Chinese:

Here's a web page showing former Japanese Kanji (yellow) and their respective present day Kanji (orange).

http://www.benricho...._kyu_kanji.html

An example how both former and present Japanese are the same and thus different from simplified Chinese.

Former Japanese:
Present Japanese:
Simplified Chinese:

 

I think all former Japanese Kanji is the same as traditional Chinese characters, but not very sure on that yet. From what I get with the wiki, the simplified Japanese (shinjitai) was introduced in 1946. Simplified Chinese was introduced a decade later, 1956. 国 would be an example how both simplified the same way.

 

Former Japanese:

Present Japanese:

Simplified Chinese:


Edited by JasonJ, 07 December 2015 - 0919 AM.

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#77 JasonJ

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 0811 AM

Bumped to indicate the correction was made, and post was improved.

 

One other thing.. Google Chrome seems to always type the former Japanese character for :lol:

 

View in Firefox to see the present ,and correct Japanese character currently in use for that particular kanji.

 

So funny... :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


Edited by JasonJ, 07 December 2015 - 0928 AM.

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#78 TOW-2

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Posted 14 December 2015 - 0152 AM

I was always a big fan of the SRAM but I understand the reasons why it was gotten rid of...


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#79 swerve

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Posted 14 December 2015 - 0434 AM

I just realised that the hiragana for 'kanji' is much simpler than the kanji - かん. Doh! What's the point of kanji which can be written more quickly & easily in hiragana?

 

Note that I know approximately no kanji. If it ain't written in kana I can't even start reading it.


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#80 JasonJ

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Posted 14 December 2015 - 0539 AM

I just realised that the hiragana for 'kanji' is much simpler than the kanji - かん. Doh! What's the point of kanji which can be written more quickly & easily in hiragana?
 
Note that I know approximately no kanji. If it ain't written in kana I can't even start reading it.


That's a very illuminating point. Korean (Hangul) used to be the same way, mixing Kanji (Hanji) and Hangul together but then Hanji use dropped not completely, but significantly, out of regular use.

Learning how to read would become a lot easier with only Kana. Althought comprehension might be more difficult. For complicated topics, I think Kanji is a little more than just helpful in indicating what word is actually being said. Things could get confusing without Kanji. But I guess Korean gets along fine without it. I don't know. Me personally, I'm one of those handful of students that likes Kanji, to the disgust of the majority. The digitalized age does make it easier to look up and write Kanji too.
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