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alt-hist c&rsenal pre-WW1

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#721 Markus Becker

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Posted 13 March 2020 - 1429 PM

M1922/29. And wed appreciate it if we could have a few dozen early next year so we can ship more to Germany when their tanks enter service.
 
And what does the comment about the Browning being belt fed refer to? The Hotchkiss I presume because the 22/29 is also belt fed.
 
Last but not least American sportsmen cam look forward to a wide range of modern semi automatic rifles and mostly modular ones too.


PS: You can always sell Savage a license for the M1933.

Edited by Markus Becker, 13 March 2020 - 1643 PM.

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#722 Simon Tan

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Posted 03 April 2020 - 0952 AM

June 1936 - Our Ambassador in Madrid is reporting that the situation there is a powder keg with right wing elements mobilized against the leftist government. Security forces are divided with both sides building their own armed elements. The socialists have their own Assault Guards while the Civil Guards and military are regarded as being aligned to the right. A number of Spanish persons have already come to Tankovina to buy both small arms and ammunition on a commercial basis. Thus far they have only been permitted to purchase sporting arms in limited quantities but they are already asking about military arms. We shall require a policy on exports to Spain sooner rather than later.

 

Americans are very strange. They seem to embrace semi-automatic shotguns but not self-loading rifles. The Remington Model 11 shotgun has far outsold the Model 8 rifle by an order of magnitude. Savage has a variant of the Auto-5/Model 11 but have not taken up sales of our self-loading designs under their banner citing weak demand. There seems to be little demand for self-loading rifles in the commercial market.

Interestingly our Teutonic residents also seem disinterested in self-loading rifles and seem quite content with their Mausers.

 

The Germans seem to have given up on mounting the M1922/29 onto their very small tank. It just will not fit into that tiny turret.

 

The Institute of Combat Studies has suggested that all infantrymen be trained on the LMG, Rifle and Grenade Launcher to allow units to maintain firepower after sustaining casualties. There is a logic to this but the training syllabus would be significantly expanded.


Edited by Simon Tan, 03 April 2020 - 0953 AM.

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#723 Markus Becker

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Posted 03 April 2020 - 1140 AM

Time is flying. 1935 went by like it wasnt there.
 
With regard to a policy on arms exports to Spain, why would we place any restrictions on what they can import? Oh, you mean what lets call it non governmental entities can buy? Well, we did a lot of business with Chinese warlords but they were the de facto regional governments at the time. In any case thats history. They arent buying machine carbines any more since we introduced the 1930 pattern.  
 
 
You are slightly mistaken about the Panzer I. It has always been designed to be armed with a large caliber AT-machine gun. The Germans merely stop purchasing the M1922/29 because their own 13mm AT-MG is finally entering production. Speaking of tanks, Panzers I and II* and Stug II** are all in service and available to us for evaluation:
 
*20mm gun
 
 
Now to the USA:
 
Our own business there is doing very well. All these gangster like Bonny and Clyde being disposed of by this or that variant of our machine carbines really got sales going. The overall relative disinterest of Americans in semi automatic rifles is probably a case of people holding their breath. The Savage Model 40 was quite the improvement and commercial success in 1934 but now there are even better ones in sight: Savages M1933 based ones and Remington's commercialized M1 family. The smaller of Winchesters lever delayed varmint guns will could even cut into our M1933 sales but the Chaco War has created so much interest in machine carbines in Central and South America that an overall decline in sales is highly unlikely.


PS: **Wrong Stug number fixed.

Edited by Markus Becker, Yesterday, 10:19 AM.

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