Jump to content


Photo

Cold War, The Reimagined Series


  • Please log in to reply
5954 replies to this topic

#5941 RETAC21

RETAC21

    A la lealtad y al valor

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12,951 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Madrid, Spain
  • Interests:Military history in general

Posted Yesterday, 01:56 PM

 

Where the ones that enabled that invariably Russians? by all means. Where the police/judges they corrupted Russian? to a man. 

As far as i remember, majority of people hunting for black slaves in Africa were also black - was it making trans-Atlantic slave trade black-controlled business?

 

 

The trans-Atlantic slave trade wasn't controlled by blacks, the "privatisation" of the ex-USSR industries was controlled by Russians, with so much faith on their country they took their money abroad as soon as possible, after paying Russian officials to "enable" them, while their countrymen freezed back home. They still do.


  • 0

#5942 RETAC21

RETAC21

    A la lealtad y al valor

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12,951 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Madrid, Spain
  • Interests:Military history in general

Posted Yesterday, 01:58 PM

 

For the one with a short memory: https://amcmuseum.or...y/provide-hope/

Let's see: "Congress appropriated $100 million for relief for the former Soviet republics" -

compare it to

"Russia imported about $1.3bn in US food and agricultural products last year, or about 11% of all US exports to the country, according to US census data."  https://www.fin24.co...sector-20140804

 

Nice deal, isn't it?

 

 

Who says there's a deal?


  • 0

#5943 JWB

JWB

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 6,792 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:everything (almost)

Posted Yesterday, 03:39 PM

 

 

No, but if you buy a company/plant/get concessions for few % of its worth thanks to the deal with corrupt politician(s) and later sell what they produce for USD in international market while avoiding paying any taxes, you couldn't care less about the worth of the rouble. Well, maybe you do, the less its worth the less it costs to pay employees.

 

But then the ones doing that were the Russians themselves.

 

For example, is William Browder Russian?

    International companies got billions from looting Russia; extra billions channeled to Western assets by  Russian criminals West became safe haven for.

 

Are you claiming he himself stole billions?


  • 0

#5944 urbanoid

urbanoid

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 5,126 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lodz, Poland

Posted Yesterday, 04:50 PM

 

No, but if you buy a company/plant/get concessions for few % of its worth thanks to the deal with corrupt politician(s) and later sell what they produce for USD in international market while avoiding paying any taxes, you couldn't care less about the worth of the rouble. Well, maybe you do, the less its worth the less it costs to pay employees.

 

But then the ones doing that were the Russians themselves.

 

Also true. As true for the Russians as for any other post-communist state, just on a much larger scale in their case, for obvious reasons.


  • 0

#5945 Simon Tan

Simon Tan

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,398 posts
  • Interests:tanks. More tanks. Guns. BIG GUNs!

Posted Yesterday, 08:10 PM

The West took Russian dignity and Russians themselves. The example was one of avarice and rapacity.
  • 0

#5946 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,173 posts
  • Location:Moscow, Russia
  • Interests:Tank recovery

Posted Today, 01:01 AM

Are you claiming he himself stole billions?

 

 

He is just one of many, became known because he was caught and kicked out of Russia while others left calmly with stolen money.


  • 0

#5947 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Of the Veronica Cartwright Ilk

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 47,522 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eloiland

Posted Today, 07:25 AM

No, Browder was arrested, shaken down, kicked out the country when he refused to pay, his company's details stolen, his money stolen, he was then framed with tax evasion, and then, when he turned to the law to do something about it, his lawyer was beaten to death.

 

I know truth is a fairly malleable thing in Tanknet these days, but it would be nice to stay on the right side of reality for 5 minutes.


  • 0

#5948 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,173 posts
  • Location:Moscow, Russia
  • Interests:Tank recovery

Posted Today, 08:47 AM

No, Browder was arrested, shaken down, kicked out the country when he refused to pay

Unfortunately, he wasn't - only not allowed to Enter Russia when arriving to VIP hall of Sheremetyevo - and put back on plane departing to London.

 

 

 lawyer was beaten to death.

 

Actually died of in prison hospital after 11 month of detention. There was no need for somebody to beat them as prison itself is quite nasty place, especially for people of that kind.


  • 0

#5949 JWB

JWB

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 6,792 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:everything (almost)

Posted Today, 11:04 AM

He was charged with about 19 million in tax fraud. Hardly billions.


  • 0

#5950 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,173 posts
  • Location:Moscow, Russia
  • Interests:Tank recovery

Posted Today, 11:22 AM

He was charged with about 19 million in tax fraud. Hardly billions.

It is what weak Russian legal system managed to find evidence of, not total amount.


  • 0

#5951 JWB

JWB

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 6,792 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:everything (almost)

Posted Today, 11:39 AM

 

He was charged with about 19 million in tax fraud. Hardly billions.

It is what weak Russian legal system managed to find evidence of, not total amount.

 

It was what corrupt Russian tax authorities calculated they could extort.


  • 0

#5952 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,173 posts
  • Location:Moscow, Russia
  • Interests:Tank recovery

Posted Today, 11:46 AM

It was what corrupt Russian tax authorities calculated they could extort.

 

 

If this brilliant business genius was able to generate 1500% profit in corrupt, not-business-friendly Russia - what profit he is generating now in non-corrupt, business-friendly Free World?


  • 0

#5953 carrierlost

carrierlost

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 926 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Estonia

Posted Today, 11:48 AM

Poll of US active-duty Military Times readers

 

THMT3GQA6NGFRJFMGEELWBT6QY.png


  • 0

#5954 JWB

JWB

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 6,792 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:everything (almost)

Posted Today, 12:25 PM

 

It was what corrupt Russian tax authorities calculated they could extort.

 

 

If this brilliant business genius was able to generate 1500% profit in corrupt, not-business-friendly Russia - what profit he is generating now in non-corrupt, business-friendly Free World?

 

If he stole money where is the proof?


  • 0

#5955 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Of the Veronica Cartwright Ilk

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 47,522 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eloiland

Posted Today, 12:38 PM

 

No, Browder was arrested, shaken down, kicked out the country when he refused to pay

Unfortunately, he wasn't - only not allowed to Enter Russia when arriving to VIP hall of Sheremetyevo - and put back on plane departing to London.

 

 

 lawyer was beaten to death.

 

Actually died of in prison hospital after 11 month of detention. There was no need for somebody to beat them as prison itself is quite nasty place, especially for people of that kind.

 

 

So your justification that he wasnt beaten was that he was held in subhuman conditions? Thats like saying nobody was shot in a Gulag because they didnt need to. :D

https://en.wikipedia...ergei_Magnitsky

 

Magnitsky was arrested and imprisoned at the Butyrka prison in Moscow in November 2008 after being accused of colluding with Hermitage.[4] Held for 11 months without trial,[4] he was, as reported by The Telegraph, "denied visits from his family" and "forced into increasingly squalid cells."[17] He developed gall stones, pancreatitis and calculous cholecystitis, for which he was given inadequate medical treatment during his incarceration.[4] Surgery was ordered in June, but never performed; detention center chief Ivan P. Prokopenko later said that he "...did not consider Magnitsky sick... Prisoners often try to pass themselves off as sick, in order to get better conditions."[18]

On 16 November 2009, eight days before he would have had to be released if he were not brought to trial, Magnitsky died. Prison officials at first attributed his death to a "rupture to the abdominal membrane" and later to a heart attack.[4] Reporters learned that Magnitsky had complained of worsening stomach pain for five days prior to his death and that by the 15th, he was vomiting every three hours, and had a visibly swollen stomach.[18] On the day of his death, the prison physician, believing Magnitsky had a chronic disease, sent him by ambulance to and later transferred him to Matrosskaya Tishina prison's medical unit, which was equipped to help him.[19] But the surgeon there—who described Magnitsky as "agitated, trying to hide behind a bag and saying people were trying to kill him"—prescribed only a painkiller, and left him to receive a psychiatric evaluation.[18] Magnitsky was found dead in his cell a little over two hours later.

According to Ludmila Alekseeva, leader of the Moscow Helsinki Group, Magnitsky had died from being beaten and tortured by several officers of the Russian Ministry of Interior.[20] The official death certificate stated "closed cerebral cranial injury" as the cause of death (in addition to the other conditions mentioned above), and the post-mortem examination showed numerous bruises and wounds on Magnitsky's legs and hands. Another post-mortem from 2011 summarized the death as being caused by "traumatic application of the blunt hard object (objects)" as confirmed by "abrasions, ecchymomas, blood effusions into the soft tissues".[21]

Journalist Owen Matthews described Magnitsky's suffering in Moscow's Butyrka prison

 

According to [Magnitsky's] heartbreaking prison diary, investigators repeatedly tried to persuade him to give testimony against Hermitage and drop the accusations against the police and tax authorities. When Magnitsky refused, he was moved to more and more horrible sections of the prison, and ultimately denied the medical treatment which could have saved his life.[22]

 

 

Poll of US active-duty Military Times readers

 

THMT3GQA6NGFRJFMGEELWBT6QY.png

 

Thats very interesting, thank you.


  • 0




2 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users