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Weight Loss Program ;)


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#21 Stefan Fredriksson

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 0313 AM

Yes. Short version is the Gracies tweaked judo* with rules more into the ground game, than standup.
Bjj is sometimes called Gracie ju jutsu, but afaik they are also selling gjj as a separate thing.
What is usually trained at gyms is bjj under IBJJF rules, more focused on competition, than self defence.

As for cost I have friends who have noted that is more expensive in the US than in Sweden, but I am not sure it says much.

Most gyms offer a few free classes to see if you like it before you decide, then I think it usually is a fixed fee per month/year.
I would try at least 2 different gyms before committing - if you like it that is.

There is a possible drawback - it is addictive, for real. If I for some reason cant train in almost a week, I get grumpy.
On the plus side, you can not think of other stuff while doing it, almost a sort of mindfulness lesson but with added psyical workout.

* If you look Kosen judo, it is very similar.

Edited by Stefan Fredriksson, 23 February 2019 - 0315 AM.

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#22 nitflegal

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Posted 01 March 2019 - 1533 PM

Any type of jutaijutsu will really burn calories when pounded upon, although I have conclusively proven that if you eat enough shit you can still get fat even when rolling. . .
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#23 Rick

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Posted 03 March 2019 - 0840 AM

Any type of jutaijutsu will really burn calories when pounded upon, although I have conclusively proven that if you eat enough shit you can still get fat even when rolling. . .

You are a sumo wrestler  :D ?


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#24 Stargrunt6

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 1718 PM

So...

 

Been doing intermittent fasting these past days. 

 

Intermittent fasting has immense health benefits.  Inhabitants of the "blue zones," where they have a disproportionate amount of people who live to be a 100, eat relatively lo-cal and fast intermittently.

 

Valter Longo, an biochemist who researches these blue zones, explains it all here.

 

 

 

Did you go to see a doctor to have a tailored diet plan?

 

If the situation over there is anything like here in America going to a doctor probably wouldn't help much.  In the States most medical schools simply have limited to zero training in nutrition which is the key to weight loss.

 

 

 

 

 

The average doctor in the states got like a 1hr lecture in nutrition while in med school.  My experience was about the same.  Medical training is geared more toward inpatient and emergent patients, so lifestyle stuff gets pushed to the side.  The average doctor will tell patients "Diet and exercise" and can't flesh out the details.   And sleep gets ignored, and I'm willing to bet sleep apnea is undertreated.  Having obstructive sleep apnea just sabotages any weight loss plan.

 

I worked with pediatric endocrinologist.  In medicine, we say kids are small adults but adults are not big kids.  One attending informed me that the research shows that the best diet researched at that time was weight watchers.  I did it for a while, just point counting, and it was working. App went lousy on me, and I didn't stick with it because I was on the road.  But it taught me what really puts on weight and what doesn't.  Some people lost weight just using the zero-points list. 

 

If anyone is concerned about low-carb vs low-fat, the jury is out:

https://examine.com/...or-weight-loss/

 

 

There is a possible drawback - it is addictive, for real. If I for some reason cant train in almost a week, I get grumpy.
On the plus side, you can not think of other stuff while doing it, almost a sort of mindfulness lesson but with added psyical workout.

 

 

Congrats, you're addicted to endorphins!  Plus, the human body is designed to move.

 

I've been trimming down.  What helped was taking care of my sleep apnea, bringing my (healthy) lunch to work as opposed to grazing out of the snack machine, cooked instead of ate out, and exercising lightly.

 

The last one was crucial. I've never had a hard time hitting the gym.  But I hit it pretty hard.  And when I get back to the gym, I do the same thing.  And have nothing left for the work-day.  It takes days for me to recover, and even my APAP can't help the sleep apnea I get.

 

Then I heard this:
 

 

Moral of that story is if you work out 70%, you can get more volume throughout the week and have something left for the rest of your life. 


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#25 Ivanhoe

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Posted 23 March 2019 - 2015 PM

I've been reading about the "time under tension" approach to weightlifting. It appeals to me, since I avoid lifting heavy but crank sets out way too quick when lifting light (patience is not one of my virtues). 

 

https://www.t-nation...e-under-tension

 

The above article is interesting in that it predicts "volume of load" being the driver for muscle growth. You can do either heavy weights and few reps per set, or lighter weights and longer sets. Basically W lbs of weight x T seconds of tension.


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#26 Stargrunt6

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 1718 PM

I used to damn near throw light weights until I hutlrt my chest benching. I still get chest pains from the tendonitis.


I taught myself that any weight is heavy if your it slow enough.

I bet there are advantages of having muscle vis a vis type 2 diabetic risk.
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#27 Ivanhoe

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 1814 PM

I used to damn near throw light weights until I hutlrt my chest benching. I still get chest pains from the tendonitis.

 

I have what I think is costochondritis, from throwing a football badly one time. A lot of people can crack their knuckles, some days I can crack my sternum. 


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#28 Stargrunt6

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 1923 PM

Costochondritis is the classic trash can diagnosis for the chest pain pt when heart attack is ruled out and they are clinically stable.
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#29 Rick

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Posted 27 March 2019 - 0523 AM

Costochondritis is the classic trash can diagnosis for the chest pain pt when heart attack is ruled out and they are clinically stable.

Asthenopia the same in the eyeball world when everything else is ruled out. 


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