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Health Quackery Roundup


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#401 Rick

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 0540 AM

 Same here. Add in don't smoke or get drunk and you got it. I would also add maintain a positive attitude.


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#402 Ivanhoe

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 0957 AM

Back in the in day in primary school we had nutrition classes (the basics of a good diet).

 

The "good diet" promoted heavily by the USDA, the Food Pyramid, has turned out to be a literal killer.

 

The war on saturated animal fats, waged by USDA, other federal agencies, and Big Education, was fought to increase revenue for corn farmers. All that federally-approved hydrogenated corn oil has been killing people.

 

Recent research seems to be indicating that prior beliefs about cholesterol are driving unhealthy choices.

 

Before we talk about lifestyle changes and eating habits, I assert we need to do much better research. The money the US spends on browbeating the plebs should be spent on clinical (not observational) research.


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#403 JWB

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Posted 20 October 2019 - 1208 PM

Women are more than twice as likely as men to suffer from PTSD.

https://www.ptsd.va....mmon_adults.asp


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#404 JWB

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 2141 PM

I thought single payer controls costs?

growth-ratessize1.png?width=401.56555772


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#405 Skywalkre

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Posted 08 November 2019 - 1351 PM

I take it that's from this article?

 

https://fee.org/arti...lth-care-costs/

 

Good read, though I had to do a double take on his fourth point.

 

As for the graph I can't help but wonder how much of a role the SAD (Standard American Diet, I've seen the acronym used quite frequently in many books recently) has played in bringing up the costs of health care in these other nations.  With globalization and the influence of America more and more people across the globe have adopted our diet... and our diet is rubbish.  Couple this to the archaic approach so many across the world have that health care starts once you go to your doc with an issue it's no wonder costs are going up everywhere.


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#406 Stargrunt6

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Posted 08 November 2019 - 2001 PM

It could just be poverty levels getting squashed.  Obesity truly is a disease of civilization.  


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#407 NickM

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Posted 08 November 2019 - 2320 PM

It could just be poverty levels getting squashed.  Obesity truly is a disease of civilization.  

Soft, comfortable civilization at that.


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#408 DB

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 1912 PM

Back in the day, a balanced diet was described as "meat and two veg" in England at least.

 

For the vegetables, that would be carrots and peas or beans. Potatoes weren't included in the "two veg", but were usually present, mainly boiled new potatoes or mashed or roast (on Sunday).

 

Strangely enough, the dietitian I had a session with a year ago suggested a quarter plate of meat, a quarter plate of carbs and the balance vegetables or salad. The only change from 40 years ago would be a wider range of alternatives to potatoes for the carbs - pasta, rice, whatever.

 

Now I think of it, rice was either in a dessert pudding, or served cold with peas in it as a side to a salad-heavy buffet in summer, and pasta would have been spaghetti, canned ravioli or Heinz 'oops, all with a tomato sauce.

 

A last note: being brought up in the 70s there was still very much the attitude that you emptied your plate or you weren't doing your duty. Parental memories of rationing, perhaps. The conditioning that comes with that persistent demand is difficult to overcome.

 

Childhood obesity I put down to kids having cash now that was never available to us, and insufficient parental control to prevent them from spending it in McDonalds, or in our case the local chippy where £1.50 buys the thick end of a pound weight of deep-fried chips, with enough salt to induce seizures in the weak.


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#409 Harold Jones

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 2029 PM

I suspect it's both more pocket money to buy junk food and less physical activity.  Most of it I put down to the ubiquity of screens to spend time on, the rise of organized sports with specialization at ever younger ages and dwindling numbers of stay at home moms.  When I was a preteen I ran with a gang of kids, we knew that any minor transgressions would be reported to our parents by one of the local housewives, and major violations of the rules might be punished on the spot and then reported.  Running with the gang was damn near literal since we walked, ran or rode our bikes everywhere we went.  Since those who were in little league generally had a practice or two during the week and played games on Saturday the local ball fields were available for pick up games.  What pocket money we got had to be divided between candy and comic books.  Unless we got lucky with a pop bottle find it rarely stretched to both.  


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#410 Ivanhoe

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 2153 PM

One thing I see nowadays is folks getting 1000 calories a day from vending machine food, particularly chips. In a lot of workplaces and schools, you are never more than 50 yards from vending machines.

 

Portion sizes are bigger, but then people are now bigger as well.

 

I have no doubt that one contributing factor to the US's health care costs is the USDA Food Pyramid along with the promotion of hydrogenated fats rather than saturated fats. A lifetime of margarine vs butter could bump up the rate of CVD several percent, which multiplied by the costs of angioplasty etc. In middle age and afterwards.


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#411 Rick

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Posted Yesterday, 05:06 AM

One thing I see nowadays is folks getting 1000 calories a day from vending machine food, particularly chips. In a lot of workplaces and schools, you are never more than 50 yards from vending machines.

 

Portion sizes are bigger, but then people are now bigger as well.

 

I have no doubt that one contributing factor to the US's health care costs is the USDA Food Pyramid along with the promotion of hydrogenated fats rather than saturated fats. A lifetime of margarine vs butter could bump up the rate of CVD several percent, which multiplied by the costs of angioplasty etc. In middle age and afterwards.

Can't disagree with your broad idea. But no matter what type of calories you take in, if you expend more than you take in, you'll lose weight although there are other health issues as you have mentioned in the over consumption of "unhealthy" foods. Skywalkre has posted several good items on health issues in the past.

U.S. healthcare costs can be dramatically lowered by decreasing obesity, tobacco, and other poor personal health care choices such as drugs, not using seat belts and homosexuality. It is depressing however, to see way too many of my fellow countrymen blame someone else for their poor health care choices and expect someone else to pay for it. 


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