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Should Rommel Have Waited In April 1941?

desert war rommel afrikakorps libya armoured warfare

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#161 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 07 July 2020 - 0142 AM

Russian invasion. 

My bad, im western centric. :)

 

 

German aircraft production in 1942 averaged 1296 per month, and by mid 1942 it had not yet shortened its pilot training schedule. 2400 aircraft lost in the Med was painful. The tipping point may have been just as much a function of the weight of aircraft being deployed by 3 major powers against it from 1943 onwards, if not more so.

I still dont get why they didnt take their pilot training more seriously. They had more than enough room in 1940 and 41 to step it up  If they had focused it in Poland as we did in Canada, there would have been no way we could have got at their training installations. Its the same mistake the Japanese made, they had a large group of highly skilled aviators and thought they would last forever. They didnt.


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#162 Harold Jones

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Posted 07 July 2020 - 1335 PM

Neither country started their respective portions of the war with the expectation of a long drawn out fight. By the time it became apparent how badly they had misjudged things they no longer had the headroom to implement a training program better suited to the losses they were facing. To me almost all the logistical studies of the axis powers are just catalogues of the many different ways they robbed Peter to pay Paul.
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#163 Nobu

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Posted 07 July 2020 - 1343 PM

It would have been an admission that the tide of quick victory had turned. Not easy to accept for a people overjoyed and, by mid 1941, accustomed to it.

 

It was the same buzzsaw the Japanese navy and army air forces encountered as well. Tactical excellence could not overcome the weight of strategic inferiority. It could only prolong it.


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#164 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted Yesterday, 01:38 AM

Neither country started their respective portions of the war with the expectation of a long drawn out fight. By the time it became apparent how badly they had misjudged things they no longer had the headroom to implement a training program better suited to the losses they were facing. To me almost all the logistical studies of the axis powers are just catalogues of the many different ways they robbed Peter to pay Paul.

Yeah, I think you have hit the nail on the head.

 

 

It would have been an admission that the tide of quick victory had turned. Not easy to accept for a people overjoyed and, by mid 1941, accustomed to it.

 

It was the same buzzsaw the Japanese navy and army air forces encountered as well. Tactical excellence could not overcome the weight of strategic inferiority. It could only prolong it.

I guess if you think about it, in both cases pending victory had turned to pending defeat remarkably quickly.


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