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#1201 Ssnake

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 1122 AM

According to the local newspaper, he was last seen at the SPD campaign headquarters late in the evening still beating the drum that they could turn it around. Well, he was old a dozen years ago already when he finally made way for Weil.


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#1202 Panzermann

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 0658 AM

According to the local newspaper, he was last seen at the SPD campaign headquarters late in the evening still beating the drum that they could turn it around. Well, he was old a dozen years ago already when he finally made way for Weil.

 

 

One of the few who actually believes in the SPD still.


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#1203 BansheeOne

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 0736 AM

Once more unto the breach, amigos.

 

Spanish election: Can another vote end the political deadlock?


By Guy Hedgecoe
Madrid
 
9 November 2019
 

It was only in April that Spain held a general election in which the Socialists (PSOE) of incumbent Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez won.

 

And yet Spanish voters are returning to the polls on Sunday for their fourth general election in four years.

 

Lacking a majority, the Socialists needed the support of other parties to form a government.

 

Drawn-out negotiations with their most natural ally, the leftist Podemos party, descended into a public feud.

 

The two parties disagreed on the format of a governing partnership.

 

Without the support of any of the other main parliamentary forces, a September deadline came and went for Mr Sánchez to form a new administration, triggering Sunday's vote.

 

Why so many elections?
 

For more than three decades the Socialists and conservatives dominated a two-party landscape.

 

But in 2015, the arrival of two relatively new parties changed that: Podemos (We Can) and further to the right Ciudadanos (Citizens). A more recent surge by the far-right Vox means that there is now a five-party system on a national level.

 

This fragmented landscape makes the formation of governments more difficult and no party has won a parliamentary majority since the conservative Popular Party (PP) in 2011.

 

Will this vote change anything?
 

Polls suggest that acting Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez's Socialists, who have 123 seats, will win again, but will again fall well short of a majority.

 

However, much will depend on the overall balance between left and right in the 350-seat Congress.

 

After the last election, a left-leaning government looked feasible due to the 42 seats of Podemos and other seats held by smaller nationalist and regional parties, as well as the collapse of the main, opposition Popular Party.

 

Since then, yet another party has emerged: Más País (More Country), which is led by the 35-year-old former deputy leader of Podemos, Íñigo Errejón. Although it is polling in single figures and will only run in around a third of Spain's provinces, Más País is expected to take seats from both Podemos and the Socialists.

 

Mr Errejón has brushed aside warnings that he risks splitting - and therefore depleting - the left-wing vote. "We are going to facilitate the formation of a leftist government," he said. "We don't have to agree on everything."

 

However, an overall swing to the right could make a leftist government impossible, or even open the door to a right-wing administration.

 

[...]

 

https://www.bbc.com/...europe-50315459

 

... wait, what? Errejón? Errejón?! :D


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#1204 BansheeOne

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Posted 10 November 2019 - 0714 AM

And it's on.

 

Bolivia's Morales calls for fresh vote after audit

 
14 minutes ago
 

Bolivia's President Evo Morales has said he will call a new election after international monitors questioned the result of last month's race.

 

Speaking at a news conference, the long-standing leader also pledged to replace members of the country's election board.

 

The Organization of American States (OAS), which monitored the elections, called for the result to be annulled.

 

Mr Morales' announcement comes after weeks of anti-government protests.

 

The president, who was first elected in 2006, denies any wrongdoing and has ignored calls to resign.

 

https://www.bbc.com/...merica-50365340

 

Meanwhile in Romania:

 

Date 10.11.2019

 

Romania: Iohannis tipped for runoff before second term as president

 

The polls have opened in Romania with incumbent Klaus Iohannis the favorite to win, but the vote may need to go to a second round. Thirteen others are vying for the presidency; the two main challengers are way behind.

 

Romanians began voting in their presidential election on Sunday with incumbent Klaus Iohannis likely to need a runoff to secure a second term. 

 

Polls suggest the 60-year-old centrist liberal will receive some 40% support but will lack the absolute majority needed in the first round to guarantee his continued tenure.

 

That would mean a runoff on November 24 with either of the two other main candidates, the Social Democrats' (PSD) leader, Viorica Dancila, and center-right Dan Barna from the Save Romanian Union party.

 

A dozen rivals for top job

 

The pair are leading a pack of 13 challengers, but both have just 20% support, according to the latest opinion polls. A third rival, actor and independent candidate Mircea Diaconu, has about 8% support.

 

Iohannis, an anti-graft policymaker who has won praise in the West for his commitment to the rule of law, is widely seen as winning any second-round vote.

 

Dancila was prime minister until last month, when her PSD was ousted in a no-confidence vote over corruption allegations. Last week, parliament approved a new transitional minority government of new PM Ludovic Orban of the centrist National Liberal Party. Orban will steer the country towards a general election next year.

 

President has veto powers

 

Romania's presidency is more than a ceremonial role. The president is commander in chief of the armed forces, nominates a prime minister — who has executive powers — and can veto laws adopted by parliament.

 

Observers said a win for Iohannis might bolster the National Liberal Party's chance of forming a stronger coalition after next year's parliamentary election and restore investor confidence eroded by several years of political instability and high levels of public spending.

 

Romania has faced European Union monitoring over progress on reform of its judiciary since 2007. But a succession of PSD governments has tried to roll back certain anti-corruption rules in recent years, joining the ranks of other ex-communist states in the bloc in incurring criticism over the rule of law.

 

[...]

 

https://www.dw.com/e...dent/a-51187403


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#1205 RETAC21

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Posted 10 November 2019 - 0742 AM

Once more unto the breach, amigos.

 

Spanish election: Can another vote end the political deadlock?


By Guy Hedgecoe
Madrid
 
9 November 2019
 

It was only in April that Spain held a general election in which the Socialists (PSOE) of incumbent Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez won.

 

And yet Spanish voters are returning to the polls on Sunday for their fourth general election in four years.

 

Lacking a majority, the Socialists needed the support of other parties to form a government.

 

Drawn-out negotiations with their most natural ally, the leftist Podemos party, descended into a public feud.

 

The two parties disagreed on the format of a governing partnership.

 

Without the support of any of the other main parliamentary forces, a September deadline came and went for Mr Sánchez to form a new administration, triggering Sunday's vote.

 

Why so many elections?
 

For more than three decades the Socialists and conservatives dominated a two-party landscape.

 

But in 2015, the arrival of two relatively new parties changed that: Podemos (We Can) and further to the right Ciudadanos (Citizens). A more recent surge by the far-right Vox means that there is now a five-party system on a national level.

 

This fragmented landscape makes the formation of governments more difficult and no party has won a parliamentary majority since the conservative Popular Party (PP) in 2011.

 

Will this vote change anything?
 

Polls suggest that acting Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez's Socialists, who have 123 seats, will win again, but will again fall well short of a majority.

 

However, much will depend on the overall balance between left and right in the 350-seat Congress.

 

After the last election, a left-leaning government looked feasible due to the 42 seats of Podemos and other seats held by smaller nationalist and regional parties, as well as the collapse of the main, opposition Popular Party.

 

Since then, yet another party has emerged: Más País (More Country), which is led by the 35-year-old former deputy leader of Podemos, Íñigo Errejón. Although it is polling in single figures and will only run in around a third of Spain's provinces, Más País is expected to take seats from both Podemos and the Socialists.

 

Mr Errejón has brushed aside warnings that he risks splitting - and therefore depleting - the left-wing vote. "We are going to facilitate the formation of a leftist government," he said. "We don't have to agree on everything."

 

However, an overall swing to the right could make a leftist government impossible, or even open the door to a right-wing administration.

 

[...]

 

https://www.bbc.com/...europe-50315459

 

... wait, what? Errejón? Errejón?! :D

 

We will be back in 6 months, we are trying to do our Brexit thing here...


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#1206 lucklucky

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 0922 AM

Once more unto the breach, amigos.

 

Spanish election: Can another vote end the political deadlock?


By Guy Hedgecoe
Madrid
 
9 November 2019
 

It was only in April that Spain held a general election in which the Socialists (PSOE) of incumbent Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez won.

 

And yet Spanish voters are returning to the polls on Sunday for their fourth general election in four years.

 

Lacking a majority, the Socialists needed the support of other parties to form a government.

 

Drawn-out negotiations with their most natural ally, the leftist Podemos party, descended into a public feud.

 

The two parties disagreed on the format of a governing partnership.

 

Without the support of any of the other main parliamentary forces, a September deadline came and went for Mr Sánchez to form a new administration, triggering Sunday's vote.

 

Why so many elections?
 

For more than three decades the Socialists and conservatives dominated a two-party landscape.

 

But in 2015, the arrival of two relatively new parties changed that: Podemos (We Can) and further to the right Ciudadanos (Citizens). A more recent surge by the far-right Vox means that there is now a five-party system on a national level.

 

This fragmented landscape makes the formation of governments more difficult and no party has won a parliamentary majority since the conservative Popular Party (PP) in 2011.

 

Will this vote change anything?
 

Polls suggest that acting Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez's Socialists, who have 123 seats, will win again, but will again fall well short of a majority.

 

However, much will depend on the overall balance between left and right in the 350-seat Congress.

 

After the last election, a left-leaning government looked feasible due to the 42 seats of Podemos and other seats held by smaller nationalist and regional parties, as well as the collapse of the main, opposition Popular Party.

 

Since then, yet another party has emerged: Más País (More Country), which is led by the 35-year-old former deputy leader of Podemos, Íñigo Errejón. Although it is polling in single figures and will only run in around a third of Spain's provinces, Más País is expected to take seats from both Podemos and the Socialists.

 

Mr Errejón has brushed aside warnings that he risks splitting - and therefore depleting - the left-wing vote. "We are going to facilitate the formation of a leftist government," he said. "We don't have to agree on everything."

 

However, an overall swing to the right could make a leftist government impossible, or even open the door to a right-wing administration.

 

[...]

 

https://www.bbc.com/...europe-50315459

 

... wait, what? Errejón? Errejón?! :D

 

BBC newspeak, Podemos is an Extreme Left which leader was a contributing opinion maker for Iranian Islamist regime propaganda TV at same time cried for feminism and LGBT rights...


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#1207 Panzermann

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 1002 AM

fun and election games in Bolivia:
 

Bolivia: Morales calls for new elections, pressure to resign mounts
Morales vowed a fresh vote and reformed electoral body after the OAS uncovered grave "manipulations." But a call from the military for him to resign has upped pressure on the leftist leader.
 
 

Bolivian President Evo Morales on Sunday called for fresh elections after the Organization of American States (OAS) found grave irregularities in the October vote. The move was soon followed by the opposition and Bolivian military backing calls for the embattled leader to resign. 
 
Morales earlier on Sunday said the upcoming presidential election would take place under a reformed electoral body. Critics have accused electoral authorities of handing an outright victory to Morales despite his failure to garner enough ballots to avoid a second-round vote.
 
"I have decided to call for new national elections so that the Bolivian people can elect its new government in a democratic manner," he was quoted as saying.
 
Calls for Morales to step down
 
But calls for Morales' resignation have become louder, with the military becoming the latest voice suggesting that he step down.
 
"After analyzing the internal conflict situation, we ask the president of the state to renounce his presidential mandate, allowing for peace to be restored and the maintenance of stability for the good of Bolivia," the commander of the country's armed forces, Williams Kaliman, told reporters on Sunday.
 
The commander of the police, General Vladimir Yuri Calderon, also called on Morales to step down.
 
Bolivian Senator Oscar Ortiz of the Social Democratic Movement told local media that "those who committed fraud" should exclude themselves from the upcoming electoral race.
 
Ortiz called on Morales to respect the results of a failed referendum earlier this year to expand presidential terms. He said Morales should recognize that he shouldn't run for office. Opposition candidate Carlos Mesa backed that view.
 
The electoral body "isn't the only one responsible for the fraud," Ortis said.
 
Morales has not yet said whether he will run again, but previously accused the opposition of trying to stage a "coup" against him.
 
Read more: Opinion: Latin America needs solidarity
 

'Manipulations'
 
In its damning report published earlier Sunday, the OAS said it was statistically unlikely that Morales had captured a 10-percentage-point lead. Under Bolivian law, such a lead would secure an outright victory for the candidate and prevent a second-round vote.
 
"The manipulations to the computer systems are of such magnitude that they must be deeply investigated by the Bolivian State to get to the bottom of and assign responsibility in this serious case," the OAS report said.
 
"The first round of elections held on October 20 must be annulled and the electoral process must begin again."
 
Read more: EU 'extremely concerned' over Bolivia vote
 

Civil unrest
 
The protests over electoral transparency and Morales' subsequent announcement also come after nearly a month of demonstrations, some violent, in the area of Potosi, where a joint Bolivian-German venture had planned to build a factory for electric vehicle batteries and a lithium hydroxide plant.
 
The Salar de Uyuni in the southwestern part of the country is the largest salt flat in the world, and also believed to be the world's largest unexploited lithium reserve.
 
The project would have met a key need for battery metals such as cobalt, nickel and lithium, as the German auto industry scrambles to build more electric cars and cut greenhouse gas emissions. It was, however, canceled earlier this month by the Bolivian government.
 
The Potosi Civic Committee, which had been organizing the demonstrations, said that the project would not benefit local communities and that profits would go only toward government elites and foreign firms.
 
On Sunday, the Bolivian Armed Forces said it ordered land and air operations to "neutralize" armed groups that act outside laws. 
 
Read more: Bolivians protest over lithium deal with German company
 
 

'Locals should benefit'
 
The German company ACI Systems Alemania (ACISA), which bills itself as a "strategic partner for lithium extraction in Bolivia," told DW it was shocked by the decision and was not informed personally. However, it later said it was "confident that our lithium project will be resumed after a phase of political calmness and clarification."
 
But Heiner Marx, director of K-UTEC Salt Technologies, a German company hired by ACISA to work on project planning, told DW that for the project to move forward, emphasis needed to be given to local communities.
 
"The local civil committees should also benefit from the extraction," Marx said. "At the moment, they have only been offered 3% of the profits. We know from our work in Argentina and Chile that the local population gets between 8% and 10%. In my opinion, this is also justified."

 

https://www.dw.com/e...unts/a-51190661


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#1208 BansheeOne

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Posted 17 November 2019 - 0727 AM

The Spanish Socialists seem determined to form a government, any government, this time.

 

November 14, 2019 / 6:47 PM / 3 days ago

 
Catalonia back in focus as Spain's Socialists seek to form government
 
 
MADRID/BARCELONA (Reuters) - Spain’s ruling Socialists courted Catalan separatists on Thursday, as they began the tough process of winning enough support in a fragmented parliament to sustain a coalition government with the far-left Unidas Podemos party.
 

Socialist acting prime minister Pedro Sanchez won an election on Sunday. But his 120 seats, combined with the 35 won by Podemos, leave them short of a majority in the 350-seat parliament, giving the 13 elected lawmakers of the left-wing separatist ERC party a potential kingmaker role in unblocking the political stalemate in Madrid.

 

Catalonia’s independence drive had loomed large over the election campaign, after anger at long jail sentences for nine separatist leaders sparked protests - at times violent - and prompted national parties, including the Socialists, to harden their stance on Spain’s most economically important region.

 

After a meeting between senior Socialist and ERC officials, the Catalan party said in a statement it had not been persuaded to back Sanchez because it had been given no guarantee that the Socialists would “abandon the repressive way” in Catalonia, but added that the two sides would keep in contact.

 

[...]

 

ERC abstained in a vote in parliament in July in which Sanchez failed to get enough support for a new term, which eventually prompted this month’s election.

 

But much has changed since then, Vilalta said, referring to the court verdict that sentenced Oriol Junqueras, the party’s chairman and former deputy leader of the Catalan government, to 13 years in jail over Catalonia’s failed independence bid in 2017.

 

Sanchez, who opposes secession and a referendum, favored talks with the Catalan separatist government at the beginning of his term, but the talks collapsed in February.

 

https://www.reuters....t-idUSKBN1XO2IK

 

Meanwhile in Sri Lanka:

 

Date 17.11.2019

 

Sri Lanka election: Opposition candidate Rajapaksa declared winner

 

Gotabaya Rajapaksa, who led the government's takedown of the Tamil Tigers a decade ago, has been declared the winner of the presidential election. Despite outbursts of violence, election turnout was at a record high.

 

Sri Lanka's election commission on Sunday declared Gotabaya Rajapaksa of the Podujana Peramuna (People's Front) party the winner of the country's presidential election. 

 

Rajapaksa scored 52.25% of the votes, the election body said. His main rival Sajith Premadasa of the National Democratic Front party, won 41.99%, according to the official results.

 

Rajapaksa, a retired lieutenant colonel nicknamed the Terminator because of his role in the country's 26-year civil war, has strong support in Sri Lanka's Sinhalese-majority areas..

 

Powerful dynasty

 

Rajapaksa is the younger brother of the charismatic but controversial Mahinda Rajapaksa, who was president from 2005-15, including during the government's final victory of the Tamil Tigers in 2009. 

 

Support for Premadasa trailed at some 44%. He had strong support in minority Tamil areas but a poor showing in larger Sinhalese constituencies.

 

Premadasa has conceded the vote to the opposition candidate. 

 

"It is my privilege to honor the decision of the people and congratulate Mr. Gotabaya Rajapaksa on his election as the seventh President of Sri Lanka," said the ruling party candidate.

 

The election commission has said the final tally would be announced by Sunday evening. 

 

Violent backdrop

 

Sri Lanka's Centre for Monitoring Election Violence reported at least 69 incidents of violence taking place on election day. Gunmen purportedly shot at buses transporting Muslim voters in Anuradhapura district, 180 kilometers north of the capital, Columbo.

 

However, chairman of the Elections Commission Mahinda Deshapriya said this did not impact attendance. Voter turnout was at a record 85%, with 15.9 million Sri Lankans casting their vote. 

 

Police heavily secured polling areas and say no further incidences occurred after polls had closed.

 

[...]

 

https://www.dw.com/e...nner/a-51282275


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#1209 JasonJ

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Posted 23 November 2019 - 1016 AM

Hong Kong district elections tomorrow if not postponed.
http://www.tank-net....43999&p=1457988
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#1210 JasonJ

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 0428 AM

Hong Kong district elections tomorrow if not postponed.
http://www.tank-net....43999&p=1457988


And the Pro-democracy camp won big, going from 118 to at least 384 out of 452 seats.
http://www.tank-net....37#entry1458153
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#1211 Ssnake

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 0508 AM

What a shocking, unexpected result.


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#1212 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 0513 AM

Oh that sucks, those people just wanting liberal Democracy, why dont they just fall asleep in the snow and accept whats good for them?


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#1213 JasonJ

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 0636 AM

I could have sworn that since CCP media was showing so many large pro-Beijing demonstrations in HK that counter the "so few crazy and foreign influenced rioters" that surely Pro-Beijing candidates would have kept majority.[omg sarc/]

So much for CCP media.

Edited by JasonJ, 25 November 2019 - 0636 AM.

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#1214 Ssnake

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 0648 AM

OMG, the foreign lizard people must have hacked the elections!


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#1215 JasonJ

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 0650 AM

It's all the CIA's fault!
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#1216 BansheeOne

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Posted 25 November 2019 - 0724 AM

Elsewhere:

Romania reelects President Klaus Iohannis

16 hours ago

Incumbent Klaus Iohannis has scored a resounding victory in the second round of Romania's presidential election. Iohannis pledged to fight corruption after the fall of the center-left government.

Romanian President Klaus Iohannis won a presidential runoff vote on Sunday, earning almost twice as many votes as his challenger Viorica Dancila from the PSD Social Democrat (PSD), exit polls showed.

[...]

With most of the votes counted, Iohannis had earned 63.2% of votes, followed by PSD leader Viorica Dancila with 36.8%.

Turnout at the election was about 50%, making it the lowest since the fall of Communism 30 years ago.

PSD defeated, Dragnea jailed

The election was fought amid resentment over judicial reforms seen to benefit PSD politicians, which led to street protests and irked European Union leaders. Iohannis has been praised by the EU for his attempts to protect the rule of law in Romania and for challenging attempts to curtail the independence of the judiciary.

The PSD former leader and strongman Liviu Dragnea was jailed on corruption charges in May, and the PSD-led government collapsed in a no-confidence vote in October.

Iohannis, whose power includes nominating the prime minister, challenging laws in the Constitutional Court and appointing some chief prosecutors, is expected to install anti-corruption prosecutors serious about tackling graft.

Iohannis' victory is regarded as giving a boost to the PNL before parliamentary elections in 2020.


https://www.dw.com/e...nnis/a-51394665

Uruguay elections: Center-right lead but too close to call

6 hours ago

Unofficial results in the presidential run-off vote saw center-right candidate Luis Lacalle Pou with a razor-thin lead. But the tight ballot means it will be days before a winner can be announced.
An election recount has been ordered after Uruguay's presidential run-off vote was deemed too close to call by authorities early on Monday, dampening center-right candidate Luis Lacalle Pou's victory claims.

Unofficial results gave former senator Lacalle Pou just over a 1% lead over Daniel Martinez, a former Montevideo mayor with the ruling Frente Amplio (Broad Front) coalition, with ballots counted at more than 99.6% of polling stations.

The electoral court said the number of provisional or contested ballots, an estimated 35,000, exceeded the margin between the two candidates.

Pro-business Lacalle Pou, of the nationalist Partido Nacional (National Party), was backed by a united opposition seeking to overtake the governing leftist Broad Front coalition which has won Uruguay's last three general and presidential elections.

'Never such a tight ballot'

"The court is not going to give a winner tonight," Electoral Court president Jose Arocena told reporters. "There was never such a tight ballot."

The final results are expected to be on hold until the rest of this week. Arocena said the ballot recount would start on Tuesday morning and completed on Friday.

[...]


https://www.dw.com/e...call/a-51396474
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#1217 JasonJ

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 0813 AM

Taiwan presidential election about 1 month from now. One current poll shows Tsai having a large lead.

TAIPEI -- Just over a month ahead of Taiwan's presidential election, incumbent Tsai Ing-wen has widened her lead over China-friendly Kuomintang candidate Han Kuo-yu.

Some 50.8% of respondents to an Apple Daily poll published on Monday said they would vote for the China-skeptic Tsai in the Jan. 11 election. Han came a distant second with 15.2%, his lowest since winning his party's primary, while People's First Party Chairman James Soong secured just 6.5% -- the same percentage as respondents who said they have not decided who to vote for.

The gap between Tsai and Han has been continually widening from just 1.9 percentage points in early August. Since her Democratic Progressive Party suffered heavy defeats in local elections late last year, Tsai has slowly regained momentum. She has been helped by Chinese President Xi Jinping ramping up the rhetoric in a push for unification with self-ruled Taiwan -- an unpopular view on the island -- and the unrest in Hong Kong raising concerns over Chinese influence.

However, poll results over the past two weeks may have been distorted by Han publicly calling supporters to lie to pollsters. "From now on when you get the pollsters' calls please tell them you 'only support Tsai Ing-wen', we can keep the DPP happy until January 10," Han wrote in a Facebook post on Nov. 29.

The KMT candidate said there are too many "strange" polls that do not reflect what people really think about the ruling administration.

Han said it is not fair to portray him or the KMT as "pro-China" or someone who will "sell" Taiwan simply because he visited the representative office of the Beijing government in Hong Kong earlier this year. He added that January's election is the "dirtiest" in Taiwan's history, claiming that he has been attacked and smeared by his opponent in a similar way to Cambridge Analytica's involvement in elections in places such as the U.S. and the U.K.

In response to Han's move, Tsai said that his supporters needn't hide their feelings if they support the KMT candidate.

Tsai has also been helped by the U.S.-China trade war, which has benefited Taiwan by luring investment to the island.

Taiwan's economy grew faster than Asian peers such as Singapore, South Korea, Japan and Hong Kong in the third quarter. Foreign investment has been a contributor to this growth, reaching nearly $10 billion in the first 10 months of the year.

Tsai's approval rating has also been boosted by Chinese defector Wang Liqiang telling the Australian government and media that he was assigned by Beijing to meddle in the Taiwanese election in favor of the KMT.

"Xi, and underling Carrie Lam, have effectively gifted Tsai a comeback from the would be political dead," Sean King, a scholar at the University of Notre Dame Liu Institute for Asia & Asian Affairs, told the Nikkei Asian Review.

While anything could happen in the next few weeks, King said that Tsai's reelection is "now all but a foregone conclusion," and Han's rather bizarre comments would demoralize his supporters.

https://asia.nikkei....gone-conclusion

Edited by JasonJ, 09 December 2019 - 0814 AM.

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#1218 JasonJ

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Posted Yesterday, 03:29 AM

Island in Papau New Guenia votes independence.

Bougainville moved a step closer to becoming an independent nation on Wednesday after results from a referendum showed an overwhelming majority want the province to cut its ties with Papua New Guinea.

More than 176,000 of the 181,000 voters who participated in the two-week referendum that concluded Dec. 6 supported independence, with about 3,000 choosing greater autonomy under Papua New Guinea, the Bougainville Referendum Commission said.

...

https://www.bloomber...apua-new-guinea

Edited by JasonJ, Yesterday, 03:30 AM.

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