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German Tiger Crash


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#1 Dawes

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 1017 AM

Any further information on this?:

 

http://www.janes.com...ior-to-crashing


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#2 Panzermann

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 1536 PM

I posted a bit over in the Mali thread, that has also gone the way of the sphinx search now. <_<

 

Well not much is known so far. The Tiger helicopter flew level and suddenly changed direction downwards. RUMINT hasit that one of the rotorblades broke off mid flight, but that is only a rumour I heard. So far an investigation is underway by GenFlSichhBw  (General Flugsicherheit; General for Flightsafety) and Airbus Helicopter has put out a warning to all four user countries.
 

 

Despite the missing information and considering a sudden failure, Airbus Helicopters declares an UNSAFE condition for all Tiger versions. AH can neither identify the part, the failure of which would lead to the accident, nor the origin of the failure (design, manufacturing, maintenance). Consequently, AH is not in the position to propose a protective measure.

 

 

All German Tiger helicopters are grounded for safety reasons and those in Mali are only allowed to fly in emergencies e.g. to support UNO troops in contact.

 

Spanish are all grounded, French and Australian are only on a limited schedule for keeping licenses and for imminent deployment training.

 

 

here is the state of affairs from australia:
 

 

Australia’s Tiger attack helicopters ‘unsafe’

 

The maker of Australia’s problematic Tiger attack helicopters has issued a safety warning describing all versions of the aircraft as being in an “unsafe condition”.

The Airbus bulletin about the choppers which have cost Australia $1.5 billion to buy, was issued after a German operated variant crashed in Africa last month.

Blades falling of the German helicopter mid flight have since been blamed as the possible cause of the crash that saw the aircraft plunge into the desert from a height of about 500m killing the two crew.

The Australian Defence Force (ADF) which operates 22 of the Tigers last week said they had not imposed any restrictions on their fleet after the crash.

But the new bulletin from Airbus released on Friday may raise concerns about continuing to fly the two seater choppers on operations.

The ADF is yet to respond to questions from The Australian asked on Saturday evening about whether any restrictions had come into force since the bulletin was issued.

The bulletin said “despite the missing information and considering a sudden failure, Airbus Helicopters (AH) declares a unsafe condition for all Tiger versions”.

“AH can neither identity the part, the failure of which would lead to the accident, nor the origin of the failure (design, manufacturing, maintenance). “Consequently AH is not in a position to propose a protective measure.”

Australia’s fleet of Tiger helicopters which ran seven years late in reaching final operational capability, have been plagued with problems and are being considered for a mid life upgrade that is estimated to cost between $500 million and $750 million.

Last week Defence had still not responded to a question on notice asked in a May Defence Estimates Hearing about whether the sustainment costs for the Tiger helicopters had blown out from a budgeted amount of $397 million to $1.3 billion.

A spokesman would only say that Defence was “actively monitoring sustainment contract of the Tiger helicopter capability to ensure it achieves value for money”.

“A response to this question on notice will be tabled in Parliament in due course,’’ he said.

Last year the helicopters were the subject of a scathing Australian National Audit Office report that noted 76 deficiencies with the aircraft.

The report said of the 76 deficiencies, 60 were deemed by Defence to critical.

“Other key limitations relate to shipborne operatoin, pilot flying hours, interoperability and communications, airworthiness and the roof mounted sight,’’ said the report.

The report said as of June last year sustainment costs had blown out from $571 million to $921 million.

After the aircraft reached FOC, it was considered by Defence able to be only deployed “in a land based non-permissive”, noted the ANAO report.

“The relevant documentation and advice to the Defence Minister did not define the meaning of such an environment.”

 

http://www.theaustra...22e9-1502656304

 

the ANAO report: https://www.anao.gov...016-2017_11.pdf


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#3 BansheeOne

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Posted 28 February 2018 - 0542 AM

According to an information by the MoD to the Bundestag's defense committee this week, the crash was likely caused by a wrong setting of the pitch axis steering. This means the autopilot hit its limit for full foward pitch in fast horizontal flight and switched itself off, which apparently happens without notification of the crew. The aircraft then went into a full nosedive within three seconds, causing negative g-forces which probably reduced the crew's ability to respond and eventually sheared off the main rotor blades. Seems to have been an individual error in that aircraft, as it hasn't been found in others upon checking. Investigations continue though.


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#4 Panzermann

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 1032 AM

According to an information by the MoD to the Bundestag's defense committee this week, the crash was likely caused by a wrong setting of the pitch axis steering. This means the autopilot hit its limit for full foward pitch in fast horizontal flight and switched itself off, which apparently happens without notification of the crew. The aircraft then went into a full nosedive within three seconds, causing negative g-forces which probably reduced the crew's ability to respond and eventually sheared off the main rotor blades. Seems to have been an individual error in that aircraft, as it hasn't been found in others upon checking. Investigations continue though.

 

It may have been that they flew hands off with the autopilot, and then there was not enough time to get hands back on the controls and the nose dive imparted too much g forces on the crew to get a grip on the sticks.

 

 

The wrongly assembled pitch axis steering looks like a mistake of the maintenance crew that was not catched when checking after the maintenance.


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#5 BansheeOne

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Posted 13 December 2018 - 0512 AM

The final report of the Bundeswehr's General, Flight Safety on the Tiger crash seems to confirm the misaligned cyclic main rotor steering as a direct cause. Apparently when three Airbus technicans set it more than a year earlier in May 2016 after a repair back in Germany, the rotorhead was leveled wrong, resulting in the misalignment. The technicans reportedly hadn't concluded the necessary training and should only have rigged the main rotor under experienced supervision.

 

The error wasn't subsequently found by Bundeswehr personnel either, who checked the paperwork but didn't know the actual method since this was industry maintenance level; the report also states Bundeswehr training was not yet up to the demanding task at this point. There was apparently one report on conspicious behavior of the aircraft in the ca. 150 flight hours prior to the crash, but it was not taken serious enough.

 

In the event, the autopilot applied forward cyclic pitch for level flight at 135 knots. When the steering hit the forward stop, it registered this as pilot intervention and switched off. The aircraft continued to nosedive until reaching 180 knots; the resulting negative g-forces prevented the crew, which had been flying hands-off, to get a grip on the controls. The mechanical forces also tore off the main rotor blades within seconds, making the crash inavoidable.


Edited by BansheeOne, 13 December 2018 - 0629 AM.

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#6 Simon Tan

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Posted 13 December 2018 - 0608 AM

Are they going to fine Airbus and jail the techs?


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#7 BansheeOne

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Posted 13 December 2018 - 0637 AM

Well, this is a flight accident investigation report; it states causes, not legal responsibilities. I'm sure there is a parallel or subsequent criminal investigation, and there will possibly be damage claims by the Bundeswehr and the families of the crew. How much responsibility lies with the technicians, with superiors who let them work with insufficient training in the first place, or others will likely be established in court.


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#8 BansheeOne

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 1142 AM

The German Tiger fleet was grounded today after an industry warning about a batch of bolts delivered for the main rotor control by a supplier in 2013, which might be faulty due to hydrogen embrittlement. The same bolt is also used in the NH 90 and EC 135, but not in safety-relevant positions.


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#9 BansheeOne

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 0556 AM

Tigers will fly again following a visual inspection of the bolt in question in each aircraft. It will also swapped out after three months or 50 hours of flying time at the latest regardless of any faults found.
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