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#61 JasonJ

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 0330 AM

 
Russian Pacific Fleet receives T-80BV tanks

Russian military Pacific Fleet marines have received new T-80BV tanks as part of Russia's Rearmament Plan of the Pacific Fleet Costal Troops programme, the Russian Ministry of Defence announced on 6 December.
 
The tanks were received in the Kamchatka region, where personnel have already undergone training on the vehicles. Live-fire exercises for the new vehicles are currently underway at the Radygino training ground.
 
The tanks have been upgraded wth new Relikt reactive armour protection in place of the obsolete Kontakt-1. The engine compartment and the rear of the turret have been improved with slat armour protection. The tank is equipped with the new Sosna-U sight.


It's an interesting development. I think there is some difficulty in posting updates on Russian activities in the Far East and Pacific region. Some update posts went into the "China's Peaceful Rise" thread and some have went into the "Cold War, the reimagined series". And now one here :)

So there is some disorganization about this. I think the Cold War thread is most appropriate but China's rise is OK now given the creation of new Chinese military equipment related threads to keep things better organized. So then the China's rise thread can morph into a China and Russia activity thread. But might be nice to give it a new title by making a new thread. But regardless of that, I really would like to keep this thread clean with only joint activities within the US-led group :)
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#62 JasonJ

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 0400 AM

On December 12th aircraft from the USAF, USMC, and JASDF conducted formation flight joint training in airspace around Okinawa.

From the US - four F-35As and one KC-135 from Kadena, two B-1Bs from Guam, and four F/A-18s from Iwakuni.

From Japan - four F-15Js and one E-2C from Naha.

gettingbiggerusjpnair.jpg

http://www.mod.go.jp...29/291212_2.pdf


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#63 Rick

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 0416 AM

Jason thanks for your good posts on an area of the world I don't pay much attention too. IMO, I believe China wants a large military for prestige. It cannot win a physical invasion and especially physically occupy any of its neighboring countries except at great cost. From my limited knowledge, China is not scoring points on the diplomatic front and is causing some countries around China to increase their military budgets. That leaves economic leverage, which for now China seems to be good at. What the future holds though,...?


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#64 JasonJ

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 0534 AM

Jason thanks for your good posts on an area of the world I don't pay much attention too. IMO, I believe China wants a large military for prestige. It cannot win a physical invasion and especially physically occupy any of its neighboring countries except at great cost. From my limited knowledge, China is not scoring points on the diplomatic front and is causing some countries around China to increase their military budgets. That leaves economic leverage, which for now China seems to be good at. What the future holds though,...?

 

I think prestige is a factor but I think there is more to China's growing military capacity. They have not reached their full potential yet. They are playing the long term game. They will use military force to intimidate surrounding countries to bend towards China's strategic interest of expanding a China dominated sphere beyond the Chinese mainland coast. I think that because of the construction of the very large military bases in the South China Sea, which one of the very large baes is within the EEZ of the Philippines, thus not only expanding military presence far beyond China's mainland coastline but also grossly violating UNCLOS. I think that because of Chinese coast guard ships going as far as Malaysia waters to do patrols. I think that because of Duterte leading the Philippines to strike a compromise position in foreign relations and economics between the US and Japan on one side and China on the other side in order to placate China so that China doesn't begin island land reclamation at Scarborough shoal. I think that because of China's never ending threats towards Taiwan when China really has no legitimate claim on Taiwan if taking honest history and common sense into account, threats that include a BM attack of 1,000 missiles, a developing amphibious capabilities with actual assault on Taiwan in mind, and having constructed mock buildings including the Taiwanese capital building and conducting training on its capture in the mock city. I think that because of illegitimate claim that China puts on Japan's Senkaku islands and how they send Coast Guard ships to sail within the territorial waters of those islands at a rate of about 33 times a year. And I think that because of the increasing number of times Chinese military aircraft fly through the Japanese islands around Okinawa on training and such and passing around and encircling Taiwan. These flight missions have grown in frequency and degree of sophistication. I could back up all these points with pictures and and such but that would take me a long time but they all have been posted among several threads. But thanks for your giving thanks again.

 

I'll put up one that shows the number of times Japan has scrambled fighters in  response to approaching Chinese aircraft. Last year, Japan scrambled fighters more than it has ever done, including any time during the cold war, roughly three times a day on average. Because of the rapid raise in the number of times that call for a scramble, Japan in early 2016 doubled the number of 15Js stationed in Naha, Okinawa in order to keep up, going from 20 aircraft to 40 aircraft. If Japan did not respond to such an increase of Chinese aircraft flying nearby, the danger would be a slow and passive transition and a new norm of acceptance the that airspace belongs to China's area of influence and consequentially, from the basis of that new norm, diplomatic negotiations and business activities would slowly realign to the new norm, effectively conceding areas to the influence of China. If there is a moral argument to let that happen, I haven't heard one yet. Outright appeasement is what it would be. So if China wants to compete to try and transition areas of influence to themselves, I see nothing wrong in competing to prevent that and an glad that Japan is stepping up rather then kow-towing. But it is more than just about provoking Japan to scramble, it is about developing a Chinese military presence. If the force level of that Chinese presence continues to raise, then it'll challenge the strength of the US and Japanese presence based in Okinawa. If the balance of power around Okinawa tips to China, it can cause a change in the strategic situation for many things. Not only to Okinawa, but also the ability for the US and Japan to help defend Taiwan or US capacity in maintaining a relevant force connected to ROK. Or at least I think so.

 

Anyway to the data, the number of scrambles for each year. So in 2016, Japan scrambled fighters over 1100 times, easily beating the previous record in 1984. I edited in the years.

scramblestotalperyear.jpg

 

 

Here is the break down as to whose aircraft the scrambles were in response to. Translations are mine. Very high number of Russia related scrambles in 2014. That was in response to Japan's support for the sanctions over the Ukraine, so Russia jacked up flights coming near Japanese airspace as a response. Still out done by the Chinese in 2016 though.

sramblebreakdown.jpg

 

Here is a map image showing the paths of the various flights that caused a scramble in 2016. I edited in the names of Senkaku and Okinawa and their location on the map. Red paths are China's and orange paths are Russia's.

scramblemap.jpg

 

 

Here is the document about the srambles where these images are coming from.

http://www.mod.go.jp...20170413_01.pdf

 

Here is a JASDF video with a part on the scrambles starting at 4:51, well the first part near the beginning of the video is about radars and detection that enable scrambles. It was made in June 2016, but in some ways already kind of old considering the even greater increase of scrambles by the end of 2016 (scrmable report is in fiscal years as in April-Mar)

 

 

Here are more reports on individual Chinese military flight formations that not just come near Japanese airspace and provoking a scramble but pass through the Okinawan islands and enter the wider Pacific Ocean.

Dec 12th http://www.mod.go.jp...20171211_01.pdf

Dec 9th http://www.mod.go.jp...20171209_01.pdf

Dec 7th http://www.mod.go.jp...20171207_02.pdf

Nov 23rd http://www.mod.go.jp...20171123_01.pdf

Nov 19th http://www.mod.go.jp...20171119_01.pdf

Nov 18th http://www.mod.go.jp...20171118_01.pdf

 

It would also be worth noting that Japan is developing defense on other islands near Okinawa to strengthen the overall area and to better safe guard the Senkaku islands.

http://www.tank-net....=7#entry1234065

http://www.tank-net....=7#entry1234592


Edited by JasonJ, 13 December 2017 - 0657 AM.

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#65 Dark_Falcon

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 1425 PM

 

 

 
Russian Pacific Fleet receives T-80BV tanks

Russian military Pacific Fleet marines have received new T-80BV tanks as part of Russia's Rearmament Plan of the Pacific Fleet Costal Troops programme, the Russian Ministry of Defence announced on 6 December.
 
The tanks were received in the Kamchatka region, where personnel have already undergone training on the vehicles. Live-fire exercises for the new vehicles are currently underway at the Radygino training ground.
 
The tanks have been upgraded wth new Relikt reactive armour protection in place of the obsolete Kontakt-1. The engine compartment and the rear of the turret have been improved with slat armour protection. The tank is equipped with the new Sosna-U sight.


It's an interesting development. I think there is some difficulty in posting updates on Russian activities in the Far East and Pacific region. Some update posts went into the "China's Peaceful Rise" thread and some have went into the "Cold War, the reimagined series". And now one here :)

So there is some disorganization about this. I think the Cold War thread is most appropriate but China's rise is OK now given the creation of new Chinese military equipment related threads to keep things better organized. So then the China's rise thread can morph into a China and Russia activity thread. But might be nice to give it a new title by making a new thread. But regardless of that, I really would like to keep this thread clean with only joint activities within the US-led group :)

 

 

I understand and I'll do as you ask.


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#66 Rick

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 0545 AM

It appears to me that it is China does not have any allies such as the U.S. has in this area. Is this correct?


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#67 JasonJ

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 0734 AM

It appears to me that it is China does not have any allies such as the U.S. has in this area. Is this correct?

Pretty much. At various levels, there are a few countries that are more or less are geopolitically aligned with a China and thus generally geopolitically against the US. Most notable is Russia. Others are Pakistan, Cambodia, Laos, and maybe a few others like perhaps South Africa recently. North Korea has traditionally been one too, I would say still is, but it's just that right now, the US is applying lots of pressure on China to apply pressure DPRK.

Another batch of countries would be more or less balancing the US and China against each other such as Singapore, Malaysia, and recently, Thailand.

With that dynamic in mind, there's been a notable adjustment of a step away from the US and a step towards China within both the Philippines and ROK, but both those countries are still, basically put, in the US camp.

Some steps going closer to the US recently were in Vietnam and Taiwan.

Japan has it's own tugs that are not similar to what the US can draw in a few cases. While the US is still like much in the Philippines, Japan saw a major increase there. AFAIK, Japan does better as far as sentiment goes in Vietnam and Indonesia than the US as well, but of course, putting aside sentiment, the US offers things (raw power) that Japan can't. And Japan does poorly in ROK overall.

It's all quite fluid. Some changes could be just short term temporary adjustments for geopolitical maneuvering such as the recent small dip for the US and the some gains for China in the Philippines. Once the Philippines develops it's economy and gets nicer military kit, they'll be able to stand up against China better. But that is a future scenerio. Who knows, if the US and Japan don't play their cards well, China may actually make more sense to partner with.

Edited by JasonJ, 14 December 2017 - 0740 AM.

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#68 Nobu

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 0852 AM

Disappointing, but not unexpected, to see that the vast majority of interceptions of Chinese aircraft are occurring over Senkaku, which Beijing and the Nationalist Chinese/Taiwanese claim jointly.

 

I would like to see the number of sorties definable as air defense intercepts by Beijing against Japanese and U.S. aircraft over the same area, for context.


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#69 BansheeOne

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 0855 AM

Japanese and German P-3Cs operating jointly out of Djibouti on anti-piracy patrols.

 

20171214-formationsflug-8.jpg

 

20171214-formationsflug-6.jpg

 

20171214-formationsflug-1.jpg

 

20171214-formationsflug-11.jpg


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#70 JasonJ

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 0942 AM

I saw those pictures a little while ago and were nice pictures to see and certainly don't mind seeing them again :) 

MoD has one of those typical style reports for the training. It was carried out on December 1st in the western part of the Gulf of Aden and involved two JMSDF P-3Cs and one P-3C from the German Navy. The stated aim of the training was to improve the JMSDF tactical skills in countermeasures to piracy and to strengthen cooperation with and to deepen mutual understanding with the EU (German Navy).

http://www.mod.go.jp...20171204_01.pdf

 

A couple of more pictures.

jpnde01.jpg

 

jpnde02.jpg

https://www.facebook...7019764/?type=3


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#71 JasonJ

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Posted 16 December 2017 - 0022 AM

Third Japan-UK 2+2 meeting held in the UK on December 14th and its points in the link below.

http://www.mod.go.jp..._j-uk_js_e.html


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#72 JasonJ

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 2242 PM

Indo-Pacific portion of the US National Security Strategy released this month on page 45.

https://www.whitehou...8-2017-0905.pdf


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#73 JasonJ

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 0407 AM

JMSDF and the Canadian Navy conducted joint training in anti-submarine warfare, etc., in the waters south of Honshu island on December 19th. From Canada was HMCS Chicoutimi, and noted as additional information, it's the same sub that came to visit Yokosuka on October 18th and trained with both the US and Japan, perhaps in this exercise. From the JMSDF were JS Izumo, JS Murasame, JS Ikazuchi, JS Hatakaze, and one P-1.

CanJPNsub01.jpg

 

CanJPNsub02.jpg

http://www.mod.go.jp...20171220-01.pdf


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#74 Dark_Falcon

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 1800 PM

 

Japan to buy Aegis Ashore missile defense systems

 

KUKUSAJWJVAQ5BFFJJ3XMPHPGE.jpg

The U.S. anti-missile station Aegis Ashore is pictured at the military base in Deveselu, Romania, on May 12, 2016. (Daniel Mihailescu/AFP via Getty Images)

TOKYO — Japan’s Cabinet on Tuesday approved a plan to purchase a set of costly land-based U.S. missile combat systems to increase the country’s defense capabilities amid escalating threats from North Korea.

 

The approval will allow the Defense Ministry to buy two Aegis Ashore systems to add to Japan’s current two-step missile defense consisting of Patriot batteries and Aegis-equipped destroyers.

 

“North Korea’s nuclear and missile development has become a greater and more imminent threat for Japan’s national security, and we need to drastically improve our ballistic missile defense capability to protect Japan continuously and sustainably,” a statement issued by the Cabinet said.

 

The deployment will add to growing defense costs in Japan as Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government pushes to allow the military a greater international role and boost its missile combat capability.

 

Defense officials say two Aegis Ashore units can cover Japan entirely by using advanced missile interceptors such as the SM-3 Block IIA, which was jointly developed by Japan and the U.S. and would cost about 200 billion yen (U.S. $1.8 billion), though they have not released exact figures.

Officials say they hope the systems are ready for operation by 2023.

 

Officials refused to disclose cost details until a planned release of a 2018 budget, in which defense spending is expected to rise to a record.

 

Abe has said he fully backs U.S. President Donald Trump’s policy of keeping all options on the table, including possible military actions, against North Korea. Abe has vowed to bolster Japan’s security cooperation and increase the use of advanced U.S. missile defense equipment.

 

 

Defense officials declined to give details about potential sites for Aegis Ashore deployment, while Japanese reports cited Self-Defense Force bases in Akita, northern Japan, and Yamaguchi, in southwestern Japan.

 

Defense officials said they chose Aegis Ashore over an option of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD, because of its cheaper cost and versatility. Typically, a THAAD setup comes with 48 missiles and nine mobile launch pads, priced about $1.1 billion, and Japan would need at least six of those to defend the country, officials said.

 

The deployment of THAAD in South Korea triggered protests from China, as Beijing considers it a security threat.

 

Aegis Ashore can be compatible with the ship-based Aegis systems that are on four Japanese destroyers and also could work with SM-6 interceptors capable of shooting down cruise missiles, defense officials said. Japan plans to add four more Aegis-equipped destroyers in the coming years.

 

The U.S. has installed the land-fixed Aegis in Romania and Poland, and Japan will be a third to host the system.


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#75 JasonJ

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 0918 AM

A bit on BMD missile procurement in the 2018 defense budget requests from both the US and Japan, the US's is requesting about 1.6 billion USD for 34 SM3 Blk1B and 6 SM3 Blk2A along with some integration costs and BMD system development (page 4-2). Japan's is asking for about 570 million USD (about 65 billion yen) to procure both SM3 Blk1B and Blk2A although it doesn't say how many for each (page 13).


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#76 JasonJ

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Posted 25 December 2017 - 1915 PM

Japan and Australia working on a "Visiting Forces Agreement". Conclusion and implementation aimed by end of 2019. Seems likely to be followed by a VFA between Japan and the UK.
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#77 JasonJ

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 2135 PM

USS Carl Vinson CSG heading back to the Western Pacific.

Spoiler

https://news.usni.org/2018/01/05/30428


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#78 JasonJ

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Posted 15 January 2018 - 2340 PM

January 2018 Parachute dropping exercise held on January 12th had many more Americans participating in the parachute dropping than last year's exercise.

0:00 Combat exercise explanation and preparation. Red team vs Blue team.

7:00 Combat exercise starts.

37:35 Blue team captures objective, combat exercise ends.

38:35 single parachute drop test and parachute release presentation.

45:23 Defense Minister Onodera arrives via gov helicopter.

55:05 Ranking office parachute drop. US command officer (Alaska and US in Japan) drop at 1:03:25

1:05:45 More US officers and US paratrooper load up.

1:08:18 Onodera again but getting off a CH-47 at a different location.

1:11:05 Training exercise explanation

1:12:02 Parachute drop exercise begins. American military (米軍) drops at 1:15:30, 1:19:23, 1:23:18, 1:27:13, and 1:31:21.

1:45:20 physical combat demonstration. Ends at 1:51:05.

1:52:10 JGSDF 1st Airborne free parachute drop.

1:56:14 US forces in Japan free parachute drop.

2:01:40 Helicopter formation flight of each heli type.

2:07:05 Speech by Onodera.

2:13:10 end.

 

5 paragraphs

Spoiler

https://www3.nhk.or....1286561000.html

 

2018airborne.jpg


Edited by JasonJ, 15 January 2018 - 2345 PM.

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#79 JasonJ

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 0907 AM

While visiting Japan, Turnbull visits a Japanese military base with Abe, emphasizing defense cooperation. Australian jets to visit for bilateral training this year.
Spoiler

http://www.theaustra...dcf0542c08148a8
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#80 JasonJ

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 2306 PM

INS Teg, one Indian sub, and JS Amagiri conducted joint-training in anti-submarine warfare and tactical maneuvers in the waters around Mumbai port on January 18th.

http://www.mod.go.jp...20180119-01.pdf

https://www.facebook...3915979/?type=3

InJpn2018o1.jpg


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