Jump to content


Photo

Tanknet Authors (by popular request)


  • Please log in to reply
239 replies to this topic

#1 Dan Robertson

Dan Robertson

    59th saddest person here

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,853 posts
  • Location:Derby
  • Interests:Park benches, neat Vodka, shopping trollies, old newspapers and designing Large Civil Turbofans for the 2020 timeframe

Posted 25 November 2003 - 1256 PM

deleted

#2 Paul in Qatar

Paul in Qatar

    The Ilk of Human Kindness

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,509 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dammam, Saudi Arabia

Posted 25 November 2003 - 1337 PM

What have you written?

Codeword Dictionary, now long-out-of-print.

What attracted you to the subject matter, how did you research it?

One day at the office we were making a list of the operations were in. One thing led to another and soon I decided I could throw it away or make it a book.

What’s in the pipeline?
Currently working on a Thesaurus of all things.

What advice would you give to any other Tanknet members who are considering writing?
Remember the difference between having a million-seller and having a million in your cellar.

#3 FlyingCanOpener

FlyingCanOpener

    Kakistocrat

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,861 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Iberia, LA USA
  • Interests:Geomatics // Naval History // Soccer // Teaching

Posted 25 November 2003 - 1404 PM

What have you written?
The Blackbird and the Falcon: An Analysis of Air Operations During the Falklands War, 1982 I wrote as a part of a project my sophomore in High School. The Project ended up taking 4th in the State Fair (The Top 3 Projects were on RMS Titanic, guess what movie was popular then...) However, the paper was deemed "Best of Show", and was published in the Louisiana Social Studies Fair Council's Minutes in Fall of 1998. Unfortunately, since then, I've seen grevious errors in the paper, but haven't gotten around to revisong it, as I have no OCR software to put it as a file to edit. I think I will heavily edit it for my upcoming paper on military operations in Diplomatic History during the Spring Semester.

What attracted you to the subject matter, how did you research it?

Max Hastings and Simon Jenkins' Book The Battle for the Falklands and Jeffery Ethell's Air War- South Atlantic got me interested in Thatcher's "Splendid Little War" and I was mesmerized by the Harrier's almost immaculate record in air combat, and chose it as my topic. Lots of reading on the little amount of information avaliable locally, and quite a few trips to the LSU and Tulane Libraries got the job done

What’s in the pipeline?

I'm writing my debut piece in a more "professional" journal about my experience in trying to join the US Air Force through AFROTC (unsuccessful in the end) to be published in Naval Institute Proceedings, and am reading books to get a headstart for what I hope my Graduate Thesis will be on: Q-Ships or Cruiser Actions of WW1

What advice would you give to any other Tanknet members who are considering writing?

Heh, I'm only 22, and I need to be the one taking advice, not giving it out. Posted Image

[edit for UBB code]

[Edited by FlyingCanOpener (25 Nov 2003).]

#4 Tiornu

Tiornu

    Proto-Germanic

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,283 posts

Posted 25 November 2003 - 1417 PM

I have two titles in print.
One is a fantasy novel, RETURN TO KALEVALA; it's derived from Finnish folklore, which may sound obscure, but it was an important influence on Tolkien. I got into this when I read the Finnish national epic The Kalevala during my college years. Great stuff. I was fortunate enough to be able to travel to Finland and do research at their national library, where I was given access to Elias Lonnrott's original manuscripts.
I also have a warship reference titled FLEETS OF WORLD WAR II, which has been described as a Consumer Reports on the ships and navies in WWII. I've had excellent reviews from the Naval War College, from William Jurens of Warship International, from wargamer.com, and others.
I began my career as a fiction writer long before I decided to work on warship references. I do have one other novel in an advanced state, but my non-fiction has largely crowded it out of the picture. It's all because of Mrs Hildebrand, my 8th grade English teacher. Since she was forcing me to read books, I struggled to find something that didn't bore me, and it turned out to be a book on aircraft carriers. I immediately became voracious about ship books, though it was only much later that a book idea occurred to me. I'd been collecting ship data for years when I finally realized that other folks would like to see what I'd come up with. FLEETS represents about 20 years of research.
On the matter of advice, I'll point out that writing is a skill like any other. If you want to pursue it professionally, start developing your abilities. Also, I suggest you keep in mind that your writing is likely to cost you more than you will earn through it. Finally, don't write anything that will compete with my books in the marketplace; this saves me the trouble of inviting my friends Vito and Guido to pay you a little visit.

#5 Dan Robertson

Dan Robertson

    59th saddest person here

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,853 posts
  • Location:Derby
  • Interests:Park benches, neat Vodka, shopping trollies, old newspapers and designing Large Civil Turbofans for the 2020 timeframe

Posted 25 November 2003 - 1417 PM

For all those not of Sam what is a "sophomore"?

#6 FlyingCanOpener

FlyingCanOpener

    Kakistocrat

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,861 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Iberia, LA USA
  • Interests:Geomatics // Naval History // Soccer // Teaching

Posted 25 November 2003 - 1452 PM

Originally posted by Dan Robertson:
For all those not of Sam what is a "sophomore"?


2nd Year in High School. I was 15/16 when I wrote it.

#7 Garth

Garth

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 5,530 posts

Posted 25 November 2003 - 1702 PM

Originally posted by Tiornu:
It's all because of Mrs Hildebrand, my 8th grade English teacher. Since she was forcing me to read books, I struggled to find something that didn't bore me, and it turned out to be a book on aircraft carriers.


Let me take a guess: It was the American Heritage Junior Library 'Carrier War in the Pacific', right?

That book, along with the Landmark Books release of 'Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo' that got my interest really going. I have both ... my original 'Thirty Seconds', now a VERY tattered and warn 20+ year old personal heirloom (I found and bought the paperback rerelease of the full version last summer) and a copy of 'Carrier War in the Pacific' that I discovered for $5.95 at a used book store about four years ago.

#8 Mk 1

Mk 1

    Difficile est saturam non scribere

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 5,088 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pleasanton, CA, USA
  • Interests:Military history, collecting and shooting historic firearms, wargaming, a house full of kidlins, life in general.

Posted 25 November 2003 - 1750 PM

Originally posted by Dan Robertson:
For all those not of Sam what is a "sophomore"?


The "class standing" used in 4 year colleges and universities in the states:

1st year = freshman
2nd year = sophomore
3rd year = junior
4th year = senior

Many 4 year high schools mimic this.

Others, notably in 3 year high-schools, go only by grades, as in 10th, 11th, and 12th grade.


-Mark 1


(edited for brevity)

[Edited by Mk 1 (26 Nov 2003).]

#9 Tiornu

Tiornu

    Proto-Germanic

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,283 posts

Posted 25 November 2003 - 2043 PM

"Let me take a guess: It was the American Heritage Junior Library 'Carrier War in the Pacific', right?"
Jeez, in all honesty, I don't remember exactly what book it was. Shame, isn't it?

#10 Bob_Mackenzie

Bob_Mackenzie

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 967 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 November 2003 - 0347 AM

[url="http://"http://homepage.ntlworld.com/bob_mackenzie/"]http://homepage.ntlworld.com/bob_mackenzie/[/url] Click TO&E Books

Books listing the [email protected] of a huge range of WW2 Eastern Front armies in a form suitable for gamers using "platoon" scale rules (Command Desision, Where panzers Dare, TAC and (ugh) Spearhead.

I was collecting the data anyway, so I fugured I may as well publish it.

Cant say its making me rich :-( but it was an ego thing anyway ;-)

The 4th Volume is stalled, due to basically boredom - it requires some very tedious data collection and besides I'm waiting for Lee Sharpe to finish his French TOE books

I may well do a book of WW2 Wargames scenarios, its about half done

Cheers

Bob

#11 Rich

Rich

    intellectual bully ilk

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,939 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:WW II, Current Defense Issues, Military History in General

Posted 26 November 2003 - 0439 AM

Hitler's Last Gamble (with Trevor N. Dupuy and David Bongard) and Artillery Hell (with Curt Johnson). The first came about as an offshoot of the Ardennes Combat Simulation Data Base that we developed for the Center of Army Analysis (known as the Concepts Anlysis Agency in those days). The second came about in a conversation with Curt, we had collected a lot of material on Antietam for another project (that went nowhere) and I happened to mention that we had enough to put together a detailed study of the artillery at Antietam. I contributed a lot of work to the Encyclopedia of Military History, The Attrition Handbook, and many other of Trevor's books. I've also written numerous reports on different topics such as Medium-Weight Armor (what a silly term), Mine Warfare, Breakpoints, Prisoner of War Capture Rates and so on.

Currently I'm working on a data compendium on the Normandy Campaign, something sort of like Niklas Zetterling's book on the Germany Army in Normandy. So far it's still just bits and pieces - you all may have seen some of it posted on this grate sigth. Posted Image

#12 Brad Edmondson

Brad Edmondson

    Commissioned Swine

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,377 posts
  • Location:Canada
  • Interests:Science, politics, philosophy, acting, writing, directing, sci-fi and all things military

Posted 26 November 2003 - 0631 AM

What’s in the pipeline?

Working title: An Atheist Foxhole. Military sci-fi that I've been chipping away at for a long time. First draft manuscript should be done in a couple of years at the rate I write.

What attracted you to the subject matter, how did you research it?

Gulf War 1 got me interested in faith issues in a warfare setting. Oddly enough, elements of the backstory I crafted are playing out in Gulf War 2. It wasn't intentional, just happened that way and my mentor is pushing me to hurry up and get published to 'cash in' on current events.

Research was done here, on many web sites and reading a lot of books on military affairs. I bought Steel Beasts with the intent of getting a simulated 'feel' for being a crew commander in the heat of combat. This of course lead to my lack of writing time Posted Image

What advice would you give to any other Tanknet members who are considering writing?

For god sakes don't write military sci-fi!!! I broke the 'write what you know' rule and had to give myself an education in all things military AND invent my own universe. It's been daunting but rewarding.

Next book takes place in a hospital, THAT I know Posted Image

EDITED For screwing up bold text.

[Edited by Brad Edmondson (26 Nov 2003).]

#13 Kenneth P. Katz

Kenneth P. Katz

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,645 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Longmeadow, MA, United States of America
  • Interests:Miltary history and technology, flying, wargaming

Posted 26 November 2003 - 0729 AM

What's in the pipeline?
A book about an important American aircraft for a major publisher of such topics. Can't get into more detail than that. I guess that 2005 is a realistic publication date.

What attracted you to the subject matter, how did you research it?
Active duty service military service involving that aircraft. I'm working with the US Air Force public affairs office to tap into a variety of official sources.

What advice would you give to any other Tanknet members who are considering writing?
I need to get, not give advice.

#14 Chris Werb

Chris Werb

    In Zod We Trust

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,913 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Orkney, Scotland, UK
  • Interests:But it's got electrolytes! They're what plants crave!

Posted 26 November 2003 - 0739 AM

Originally posted by Dan Robertson:
For all those not of Sam what is a "sophomore"?


The 'sophomore year' is the relatavistic effect prevalent in Buffy the Vampire Slayer whereby characters appear to complete one year of high school for every four that actually pass by. As a result they leave school looking about 30 years old.



[Edited by Chris Werb (28 Nov 2003).]

#15 Tony Williams

Tony Williams

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 7,601 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK
  • Interests:Military guns and ammunition (all calibres)

Posted 26 November 2003 - 1751 PM

Originally posted by Dan Robertson:
What have you written?


I started over 20 years ago with articles, mainly about guns and ammunition, in such magazines as 'Guns Review International' (sadly departed), 'Military History' and 'Warship World'. Most of these have since been posted (with varying degrees of modification) on my website.

My first book was 'Rapid Fire' (see below). I have since collaborated with Emmanuel Gustin on the 'Flying Guns' series, a history of the development of aircraft guns, ammunition and installations. The first volume, covering 1933-1945, was published in March this year. The next volume will deal with 1914-1932 and is due out in January. The third volume will go from the end of WW2 to the present day; it is complete and due for publication next March.

What attracted you to the subject matter, how did you research it?


I have been interested in military technology for as long as I can remember - blame childhood Airfix kits of planes, tanks and ships! At university I took up rifle and pistol shooting, and met an ammunition collector (an expensive meeting...). My collecting days then lapsed for some time, but I became interested again about 15 years ago and really started hunting for them; I now have something over 800 between 2.7mm and 105mm calibre, mostly of different case types, and specialise in military 12.7-57mm, with a side interest in small arms ammunition.

As a result of collecting I met the late Herbert Woodend, the curator of the MoD Pattern Room, which apart from its amazing weapon collection also had a comprehensive library. I became particularly frustrated by the lack of published information about heavy automatic weapons, so I wrote 'Rapid Fire' because it was the book I always wanted to read. It took about two years between starting to write and seeing it published.

'Flying Guns' started with the same motivation. I've always wanted to read a detailed history of aircraft guns (I once badgered Bill Gunston to write one, but he said he didn't have the time). What really kicked this one off was another book on the subject. I don't like to knock fellow authors, but having (sadly) paid for it I felt I could do much better (see: http://www.j-aircraf....php?revnumb=19 for a review) so I got in touch with Emmanuel, who I met over the internet and I knew had a considerable knowledge of aircraft and weapon installations, and proposed the book - which turned into three volumes.

What’s in the pipeline?


I'm working with Max Popenker (who also visits this site) on a history of post-WW2 military rifles and ammunition, probably to be called 'Assault Rifle'. I'm doing the general history chapters, Max the detailed gun descriptions - anyone who knows his website will realise just how comprehensive his information is. It's on schedule for completion at the end of January, with publication possibly in the summer.

After that, I'm not sure. The first book I wanted to write was actually a naval history one (watch out, Richard - or perhaps we could collaborate!) on the interwar naval treaties, their effects on warship design and fleet composition, and the consequences of that in WW2. I've been collecting material for that project for years, and one day...

I also have a probably rash ambition to update and rewrite Chinn's 'The Machine Gun' - all five volumes and 2,500 pages of it. It is THE classic work on the subject, but the more I learn, the more I become aware of the ways in which it could be improved.

Last but not least, the first book I actually started writing was a WW2 alternate history novel. I got about three-quarters of the way through it then put it aside to write 'Rapid Fire'. I really must try to finish it next year...

What advice would you give to any other Tanknet members who are considering writing?


First, you must really enjoy writing. You have to commit a lot of time and mental energy to the task, and you won't finish it unless you get satisfaction from putting a well-constructed argument down on paper. Secondly, you must be really interested in the subject and should have something fresh to say about it. Thirdly, get the book planned in detail with at least one sample chapter (and preferably finish the first draft) before you go hunting for a publisher - and the hunt may take some time; I was initially turned down by three or four. Fourth, do some research into the market. What sort of books or articles have been written on this subject already? What can you do that's different? Who publishes them?

Finally, good luck!

Tony Williams: Military gun and ammunition [url="http://"http://www.quarry.nildram.co.uk"]website[/url] and Discussion [url="http://"http://forums.delphiforums.com/autogun/messages/"]forum[/url]

#16 Kenneth P. Katz

Kenneth P. Katz

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,645 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Longmeadow, MA, United States of America
  • Interests:Miltary history and technology, flying, wargaming

Posted 26 November 2003 - 1822 PM

Tony:

Are you a full-time writer or do you just write on the side?

Ken

#17 Tiornu

Tiornu

    Proto-Germanic

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,283 posts

Posted 26 November 2003 - 1913 PM

"After that, I'm not sure. The first book I wanted to write was actually a naval history one (watch out, Richard - or perhaps we could collaborate!)" Hey, I'm always up for a good collaboration. Of course, I'll first need to unearth myself from beneath my current mountain of commitments....

#18 Tony Williams

Tony Williams

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 7,601 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK
  • Interests:Military guns and ammunition (all calibres)

Posted 27 November 2003 - 0018 AM

Originally posted by Kenneth P. Katz:
Tony:

Are you a full-time writer or do you just write on the side?

Ken


Sadly, I have a full-time job which is nothing to do with my writing interests. Fortunately, I have a tolerant wife. I'm hoping to take early retirement in a couple of years so I can concentrate on writing full-time.

Incidentally, one other bit of advice to future writers which I can endorse; don't expect to make money at it! You'd have to be churning out popular books full-time, like Ian Hogg or Bill Gunston, for it to bring in much income. You really have to want to see your work in print...

Tony Williams: Military gun and ammunition [url="http://"http://www.quarry.nildram.co.uk"]website[/url] and Discussion [url="http://"http://forums.delphiforums.com/autogun/messages/"]forum[/url]

#19 Gennady I. Beregovoy

Gennady I. Beregovoy

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2,928 posts
  • Interests:Tanks, women with chinky or almond shaped eyes, military, history

Posted 27 November 2003 - 0109 AM

Does writing hundreds of pages of sarcasm and not-so-in-depth "philosophy", printed out with a regular inkjet printer, bound by meself, and giving it as a gift to a former classmate as a "book" count? Or does a short story on the Y2K bug but not having published it except being printed out again with an inkjet printer and having made the rounds among family members count? Because if so, I'm in! Posted Image

TomC is also a writer - got 2 books under his belt I think. Ok, he's more at ACIG than over here, but he does post here from time-to-time, so I guess that counts, too?

<font size=1>[Edited by Gennady I. Beregovoy (27 Nov 2003).]

[Edited by Gennady I. Beregovoy (27 Nov 2003).]

#20 Marsh

Marsh

    Miserable old git

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,207 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sadly, no longer in God's own county...Yorkshire!.
  • Interests:Tanks. S.F. Photography.Wine, Women and Celtic folk music.

Posted 27 November 2003 - 0128 AM

What have you written?

Hmm, about 80 or so articles on military related topics and slightly more on infectious diseases and the history of nursing.

I have contributed 5 chapters for other peoples books on topics as divergent as sexually transmitted parasites, history of wound care and the Golan Heights in 1973 and now.

I have had one book published by Brasseys on modern MBTS.. One book published by Mouse House on Israeli heavy APCs.

What attracted you to the subject matter, how did you research it?

I have been facinated by military history since I was a kid. My hobby was photography. I did a part-time MA in War Studies to keep my mind active when working as a nurse. I then decided to combine my interests, hobby and academic work to see if I could make some money from them. Started about 11 years or so and have gone on since on a part-time basis.

What’s in the pipeline?

I have a book coming out in February 2004 published by Osprey on Israeli tanks and APCs 1984-2004. I am currently working on a book for Mouse House on the Merkava. I also have written a book "Bring Out Your Dead" - a history of infectious diseases for which I am looking for a publisher.
I also have a number of articles which should be published over the next few months


What advice would you give to any other Tanknet members who are considering writing

Apart from Tony's sensible advice, be prepared for a lot of heartache!


cheers
Marsh
Edited for clumsy fingers syndrome

[Edited by Marsh (27 Nov 2003).]




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users