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Guess The Japanese Are Getting Serious


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#681 JasonJ

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 0809 AM

That constitution was American imposed BTW.


That was just a bad deal. Trump will cancel that constitution and negotiate a better one, and it will be the best deal for America evahr!

If there is a way to motivate right wingers who want to change the constitution into changing their minds and supporting the current constitution, it might be that :)
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#682 JasonJ

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 0924 AM

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Edited by JasonJ, 07 August 2019 - 0427 AM.

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#683 JasonJ

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 0624 AM

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Edited by JasonJ, 07 August 2019 - 0427 AM.

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#684 JasonJ

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Posted 17 July 2019 - 0956 AM

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Edited by JasonJ, 07 August 2019 - 0426 AM.

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#685 JasonJ

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Posted 17 July 2019 - 1805 PM

What's intetesting about this politicized-history based trade spat is that it illuminated the dependency that big Korean chip companies had on Japanese technology. It'll be interesting to see where this goes. If Korea finds a good substitute for chip making materials from somewhere else, then Japan loses a buyer for the chip making tech. I don't know who could be a substitute, maybe a company in the EU, China, or a US company. So then Japan would need to find someone else that wants to be a chip maker, maybe a company in Taiwan or Vietnam. Well I'm no expert in the chip making industry. But there's probably a lot of important points in there that doesn't make its way into the hot air loving MSM.

Edited by JasonJ, 17 July 2019 - 1812 PM.

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#686 JasonJ

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Posted 17 July 2019 - 1833 PM

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Edited by JasonJ, 07 August 2019 - 0426 AM.

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#687 JasonJ

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Posted 18 July 2019 - 1035 AM

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Edited by JasonJ, 07 August 2019 - 0426 AM.

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#688 JasonJ

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 0714 AM

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Edited by JasonJ, 07 August 2019 - 0840 AM.

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#689 JasonJ

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Posted 19 July 2019 - 0722 AM

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Edited by JasonJ, 07 August 2019 - 0424 AM.

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#690 JasonJ

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 0838 AM

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Edited by JasonJ, 07 August 2019 - 0425 AM.

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#691 Nobu

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 0922 AM

The Koreans are now joining the blue-water seriousness parade in various ways.

 

With emotions as high on the Korean peninsula as they have ever been, the target of the South Korean naval build-up appears as clear as their lack of concern over intermediate-ranged North Korean weaponry.

 

Both are optimized for deployment against Japan.

 

 

South Korea to build ship for short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing aircraft

 

SEOUL — South Korea is to launch a new version of a large-deck landing ship from which short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing aircraft can operate by the late 2020s, amid naval buildups in China and Japan.

 

The decision was made during a July 12 meeting of top brass presided over by Gen. Park Han-ki, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Anti-Japanese sentiment in South Korea is gaining traction over Tokyo’s export restrictions on high-tech materials to South Korea.

 

“The plan of building the LPH-II ship has been included in a long-term force buildup plan,” said a spokesman for the Joint Chiefs, speaking on condition of anonymity and using an acronym for “landing platform helicopter.”

 

“Once a preliminary research is completed within a couple of years, the shipbuilding plan is expected to be included in the midterm acquisition list,” the spokesman added.

The new LPH is to be refit to displace 30,000 tons, double the capacity of the previous two LPHs — Dokdo and Marado — with 14,500 tons of displacement. The carrier-type vessel is also bigger than the 27,000 tons associated with Japan’s Izumo-class helicopter destroyers.

 

“It’s the first time that a light aircraft carrier-class ship is pursued under South Korea’s force improvement plans,” Kim Dae-young, an analyst at the Seoul-based Korea Research Institute for National Strategy, told Defense News. “It’s also a symbolic and meaningful step to upgrade the country’s naval capability against potential threats posed by Japan and China.”

 

Japan has plans to convert its two Izumo-class helicopter destroyers by 2023 to light aircraft carriers from which the F-35B short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing (STOVL) jet can operate.

 

China is building two more aircraft carriers in addition to Liaoning, a refurbished ex-Soviet carrier. A modified version of the Liaoning is currently being fitted out in northern China, while another, larger carrier is having its modules built at a shipyard in the city of Shanghai. China is also building a Type 075 helicopter assault ship at another shipyard in the same city, while continuing to crank out a variety of conventional and nuclear-powered submarines.

 

South Korea bought 40 F-35As for its Air Force in 2014 for $6.75 billion, and 20 more could be purchased as part of midterm arms-buildup plans. In tandem with the light aircraft carrier plan, the military is considering buying 20 more F-35Bs, a defense procurement source said.

 

“A pilot study on the purchase of F-35Bs is being conducted by a state-funded research institute. The study results are to be released as early as September,” the source said, speaking on condition of anonymity. “The study weighs in on two options to replace the order of F-35As with F-35Bs, and buy 20 more F-35s additionally.”

 

The new carrier is expected to hold 16 STOVL aircraft, 3,000 marines and 20 armored vehicles, according to the source. The LPH-II is expected to have a ski jump-style launch ramp.

The South Korean Navy has already launched two Dokdo-class LPHs in an effort to develop its blue-water operational capability, as well as counter North Korean threats.

 

In May 2018, the second Dokdo-class LPH was launched with reconfigurations from the lead ship. The 199-meter-long, 31-meter-wide LPH is equipped with a fixed-panel 3D surveillance radar built by Elta Systems, a subsidiary of Israel Aerospace Industries, in place of the Thales SMART 3D radar aboard the Dokdo.

 

As for Marado, its flight deck was adapted to accommodate two V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, while the Dokdo could carry only one V-22. Marado is also fitted with two Phalanx close-in weapon systems, instead of the Goalkeeper CIWS installed on the Dokdo.

 

The Dokdo-class LPH can carry up to 720 fully equipped marines, 10 tanks, 10 trucks, seven amphibious assault vehicles and three artillery systems. It can sail at a maximum speed of 41 KPH with a crew of 300 on board.

 

The well deck has a capacity for two landing craft. Below the deck hanger, 15 helicopters, including two V-22s, can fit while the flight deck can simultaneously accommodate up to five helicopters of all types.


Edited by Nobu, 25 July 2019 - 0926 AM.

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#692 JasonJ

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 0949 AM

 

The Koreans are now joining the blue-water seriousness parade in various ways.

 

With emotions as high on the Korean peninsula as they have ever been, the target of the South Korean naval build-up appears as clear as their lack of concern over intermediate-ranged North Korean weaponry.

 

Both are optimized for deployment against Japan.

 

 

South Korea to build ship for short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing aircraft

 

SEOUL — South Korea is to launch a new version of a large-deck landing ship from which short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing aircraft can operate by the late 2020s, amid naval buildups in China and Japan.

 

The decision was made during a July 12 meeting of top brass presided over by Gen. Park Han-ki, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Anti-Japanese sentiment in South Korea is gaining traction over Tokyo’s export restrictions on high-tech materials to South Korea.

 

“The plan of building the LPH-II ship has been included in a long-term force buildup plan,” said a spokesman for the Joint Chiefs, speaking on condition of anonymity and using an acronym for “landing platform helicopter.”

 

“Once a preliminary research is completed within a couple of years, the shipbuilding plan is expected to be included in the midterm acquisition list,” the spokesman added.

The new LPH is to be refit to displace 30,000 tons, double the capacity of the previous two LPHs — Dokdo and Marado — with 14,500 tons of displacement. The carrier-type vessel is also bigger than the 27,000 tons associated with Japan’s Izumo-class helicopter destroyers.

 

“It’s the first time that a light aircraft carrier-class ship is pursued under South Korea’s force improvement plans,” Kim Dae-young, an analyst at the Seoul-based Korea Research Institute for National Strategy, told Defense News. “It’s also a symbolic and meaningful step to upgrade the country’s naval capability against potential threats posed by Japan and China.”

 

Japan has plans to convert its two Izumo-class helicopter destroyers by 2023 to light aircraft carriers from which the F-35B short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing (STOVL) jet can operate.

 

China is building two more aircraft carriers in addition to Liaoning, a refurbished ex-Soviet carrier. A modified version of the Liaoning is currently being fitted out in northern China, while another, larger carrier is having its modules built at a shipyard in the city of Shanghai. China is also building a Type 075 helicopter assault ship at another shipyard in the same city, while continuing to crank out a variety of conventional and nuclear-powered submarines.

 

South Korea bought 40 F-35As for its Air Force in 2014 for $6.75 billion, and 20 more could be purchased as part of midterm arms-buildup plans. In tandem with the light aircraft carrier plan, the military is considering buying 20 more F-35Bs, a defense procurement source said.

 

“A pilot study on the purchase of F-35Bs is being conducted by a state-funded research institute. The study results are to be released as early as September,” the source said, speaking on condition of anonymity. “The study weighs in on two options to replace the order of F-35As with F-35Bs, and buy 20 more F-35s additionally.”

 

The new carrier is expected to hold 16 STOVL aircraft, 3,000 marines and 20 armored vehicles, according to the source. The LPH-II is expected to have a ski jump-style launch ramp.

The South Korean Navy has already launched two Dokdo-class LPHs in an effort to develop its blue-water operational capability, as well as counter North Korean threats.

 

In May 2018, the second Dokdo-class LPH was launched with reconfigurations from the lead ship. The 199-meter-long, 31-meter-wide LPH is equipped with a fixed-panel 3D surveillance radar built by Elta Systems, a subsidiary of Israel Aerospace Industries, in place of the Thales SMART 3D radar aboard the Dokdo.

 

As for Marado, its flight deck was adapted to accommodate two V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, while the Dokdo could carry only one V-22. Marado is also fitted with two Phalanx close-in weapon systems, instead of the Goalkeeper CIWS installed on the Dokdo.

 

The Dokdo-class LPH can carry up to 720 fully equipped marines, 10 tanks, 10 trucks, seven amphibious assault vehicles and three artillery systems. It can sail at a maximum speed of 41 KPH with a crew of 300 on board.

 

The well deck has a capacity for two landing craft. Below the deck hanger, 15 helicopters, including two V-22s, can fit while the flight deck can simultaneously accommodate up to five helicopters of all types.

 

 

This design requirement to be able to carry 3,000 marines and 20 armored vehicles sounds like something what Australia already has.

TS19b4.jpg

 

They'll be unsuited for the role of establishing superiority across an area of sea even if they load F-35Bs.


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#693 Nobu

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 1124 AM

For a nation supposedly in fear of a sudden land invasion from the North, the South Koreans sure are spending resources heavily on a blue-water naval capability.


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#694 sunday

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 1621 PM

 

 

The Koreans are now joining the blue-water seriousness parade in various ways.

 

With emotions as high on the Korean peninsula as they have ever been, the target of the South Korean naval build-up appears as clear as their lack of concern over intermediate-ranged North Korean weaponry.

 

Both are optimized for deployment against Japan.

 

 

South Korea to build ship for short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing aircraft

 

SEOUL — South Korea is to launch a new version of a large-deck landing ship from which short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing aircraft can operate by the late 2020s, amid naval buildups in China and Japan.

 

The decision was made during a July 12 meeting of top brass presided over by Gen. Park Han-ki, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Anti-Japanese sentiment in South Korea is gaining traction over Tokyo’s export restrictions on high-tech materials to South Korea.

 

“The plan of building the LPH-II ship has been included in a long-term force buildup plan,” said a spokesman for the Joint Chiefs, speaking on condition of anonymity and using an acronym for “landing platform helicopter.”

 

“Once a preliminary research is completed within a couple of years, the shipbuilding plan is expected to be included in the midterm acquisition list,” the spokesman added.

The new LPH is to be refit to displace 30,000 tons, double the capacity of the previous two LPHs — Dokdo and Marado — with 14,500 tons of displacement. The carrier-type vessel is also bigger than the 27,000 tons associated with Japan’s Izumo-class helicopter destroyers.

 

“It’s the first time that a light aircraft carrier-class ship is pursued under South Korea’s force improvement plans,” Kim Dae-young, an analyst at the Seoul-based Korea Research Institute for National Strategy, told Defense News. “It’s also a symbolic and meaningful step to upgrade the country’s naval capability against potential threats posed by Japan and China.”

 

Japan has plans to convert its two Izumo-class helicopter destroyers by 2023 to light aircraft carriers from which the F-35B short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing (STOVL) jet can operate.

 

China is building two more aircraft carriers in addition to Liaoning, a refurbished ex-Soviet carrier. A modified version of the Liaoning is currently being fitted out in northern China, while another, larger carrier is having its modules built at a shipyard in the city of Shanghai. China is also building a Type 075 helicopter assault ship at another shipyard in the same city, while continuing to crank out a variety of conventional and nuclear-powered submarines.

 

South Korea bought 40 F-35As for its Air Force in 2014 for $6.75 billion, and 20 more could be purchased as part of midterm arms-buildup plans. In tandem with the light aircraft carrier plan, the military is considering buying 20 more F-35Bs, a defense procurement source said.

 

“A pilot study on the purchase of F-35Bs is being conducted by a state-funded research institute. The study results are to be released as early as September,” the source said, speaking on condition of anonymity. “The study weighs in on two options to replace the order of F-35As with F-35Bs, and buy 20 more F-35s additionally.”

 

The new carrier is expected to hold 16 STOVL aircraft, 3,000 marines and 20 armored vehicles, according to the source. The LPH-II is expected to have a ski jump-style launch ramp.

The South Korean Navy has already launched two Dokdo-class LPHs in an effort to develop its blue-water operational capability, as well as counter North Korean threats.

 

In May 2018, the second Dokdo-class LPH was launched with reconfigurations from the lead ship. The 199-meter-long, 31-meter-wide LPH is equipped with a fixed-panel 3D surveillance radar built by Elta Systems, a subsidiary of Israel Aerospace Industries, in place of the Thales SMART 3D radar aboard the Dokdo.

 

As for Marado, its flight deck was adapted to accommodate two V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, while the Dokdo could carry only one V-22. Marado is also fitted with two Phalanx close-in weapon systems, instead of the Goalkeeper CIWS installed on the Dokdo.

 

The Dokdo-class LPH can carry up to 720 fully equipped marines, 10 tanks, 10 trucks, seven amphibious assault vehicles and three artillery systems. It can sail at a maximum speed of 41 KPH with a crew of 300 on board.

 

The well deck has a capacity for two landing craft. Below the deck hanger, 15 helicopters, including two V-22s, can fit while the flight deck can simultaneously accommodate up to five helicopters of all types.

 

 

This design requirement to be able to carry 3,000 marines and 20 armored vehicles sounds like something what Australia already has.

TS19b4.jpg

 

They'll be unsuited for the role of establishing superiority across an area of sea even if they load F-35Bs.

 

 

I do not see Korea buying ships to Spain.


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#695 JasonJ

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 1645 PM

Of course they will make their own ships
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#696 Nobu

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 1700 PM

I see Argentinians purchasing modern Korean FA-50s to re-equip its naval air arm. 

 

Range to the Falklands/Malvinas: within its combat radius.


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#697 R011

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 1712 PM

Who is selling used FA-50 cheap?
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#698 JasonJ

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 0814 AM

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Edited by JasonJ, 07 August 2019 - 0423 AM.

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#699 Chris Werb

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 1751 PM

For a nation supposedly in fear of a sudden land invasion from the North, the South Koreans sure are spending resources heavily on a blue-water naval capability.

 

The aircraft carrier is for "great nation status" - it makes no sense in any scenario I can think of in which they might plausibly get involved.


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#700 Calvinb1nav

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 1839 PM

For a nation supposedly in fear of a sudden land invasion from the North, the South Koreans sure are spending resources heavily on a blue-water naval capability.

You'd think.  From my time as an exchange student with the Korean Air Force, I can tell you the ROKAF worries more about the Japanese than the north Koreans.  The Army could care less about the Japanese and the Navy was open to working with their counterparts, but the ROKAF and the civilian political leadership live in stark terror of a Japanese invasion.  

 

I knew a USAF colonel who did a briefing on the Strike Eagle for the Koreans when they were in the market.  So he made a map showing the combat radii of all the competing aircraft (Rafale, Su-35, EF-2000, F-15E, etc.).  He said that the ROKAF guys didn't even look to see if all of nK was covered and when they saw only the F-15E could reach anywhere in Japan, they decided on the F-15K.  


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