Jump to content


Photo

Because The United Kingdom?


  • Please log in to reply
4416 replies to this topic

#3981 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55,776 posts

Posted 09 July 2019 - 0710 AM

How do American's get their Hot Dogs, do they harvest them off trees or something? Hunt them in the wild? :P


  • 0

#3982 Tim the Tank Nut

Tim the Tank Nut

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 5,982 posts

Posted 09 July 2019 - 0837 AM

A wild hot dog is too dangerous to hunt


  • 0

#3983 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55,776 posts

Posted 09 July 2019 - 0839 AM

Just as well we keep those suckers in airless jars, huh? :)


  • 0

#3984 JWB

JWB

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 7,729 posts

Posted 11 July 2019 - 2054 PM

Critiquing Trump was not the problem. Failing to use British doublespeak was.


 


Anyone can be blunt. Ambassador Darroch should have mastered the English art of elusive meaning.

It was a cultural Defcon 1, enough to make the British break out in a sweat, or at least deploy the emergency stiff upper lip, the one reserved for the trickiest of pickles. Brexit, for once, was not the issue, but rather the leaked diplomatic cables that had exposed the wholly blunt assessment of President Trump by the British ambassador to the United States, Sir Kim Darroch.

To be clear, it wasn’t so much the assessment, or indeed the response of a wrathful president (“We’re not big fans of that man”), that made the British shiver as we knocked back a steadying cup of tea. It wasn’t even the whispers currently doing the rounds that the leak was a maneuver by Brexiteers to have Nigel Farage — Brexit’s very own flatterer-in-chief to this uniquely fragile and praise-hungry POTUS — installed in Darroch’s place, as dark a prospect as that is.

This sudden chill ran deeper. It tapped into something existential. About our worst fears as a nation. About who we are. If being British means anything, it is surely our ability to speak perfectly clearly and with absolute candor while still managing to be bafflingly, frustratingly elusive as to what we really mean.

This trait forms the foundation on which Brand Britain is built. It’s behind the appeal of our movie stars — from Hugh Grant’s tongue-tied leading men to every one of Hollywood’s sardonic, supercilious supervillains. It’s there in the distancing personae and gnomic uncanniness of our pop; in David Bowie and Radiohead. It’s there in the way we offer our highest praise (“not bad at all”) and our most scathing critiques (“interesting”), our manners, our social and gender roles, our consumption habits. One of the great pleasures for Brits watching American TV — sports, drama, movies, news, you name it — is gape-mouthed boggling at just how often people confront one another. Like, openly. It turns everything — earnest family healing moments, tough-guy talk, interviews — into brilliantly addictive comedy-horror. (Netflix, you’re missing a category over here.)

That humourous description is a good lead in to perhaps the most hilarious bits I have ever read:


 

British government business is successfully navigated through drive-by riddling to this day. Postwar prime minister Clement Attlee was said in a newspaper column by an unnamed opponent — commonly supposed to have been Winston Churchill — to be “a modest man, with much to be modest about.”

........


 

For all the moral and intellectual faults and disqualifiers for high office of Boris Johnson, this is perhaps his chief skill. He speaks in a way that is both a joke and serious. Asked recently what he does to relax, he declared — to much derision — that he enjoys crafting and painting model vehicles — buses, mainly.

https://www.washingt...m=.564745a46340


  • 0

#3985 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55,776 posts

Posted 12 July 2019 - 0221 AM

My favourite doublespeak from a British politician. 'Economical with the actualité'. Alan Clarke I think.


  • 0

#3986 Panzermann

Panzermann

    REFORGER '79

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,695 posts

Posted 12 July 2019 - 0858 AM

My favourite doublespeak from a British politician. 'Economical with the actualité'. Alan Clarke I think.

 

doublespeak? More like non-speak. I have no idea what he is saying.


  • 0

#3987 sunday

sunday

    Bronze-age right-wing delusional retard

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12,036 posts

Posted 12 July 2019 - 0935 AM

 

My favourite doublespeak from a British politician. 'Economical with the actualité'. Alan Clarke I think.

 

doublespeak? More like non-speak. I have no idea what he is saying.

 

 

Well, he was half speaking in French.


  • 0

#3988 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55,776 posts

Posted 12 July 2019 - 0940 AM

 

My favourite doublespeak from a British politician. 'Economical with the actualité'. Alan Clarke I think.

 

doublespeak? More like non-speak. I have no idea what he is saying.

 

 

He was basically saying 'economical with the truth'. But if as a British politician you ever said such a thing, you would be all over the tabloids the next morning. So by changing it into actualité, he was saying pretty much the same thing, but without the stink.

 

It was after looking it up, Alan Clark during the Matrix Churchill trial. You know, the big foxtrot oscar Iraqi supergun that was built by Britain.

http://anarchyintheu...-the-actualite/


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 12 July 2019 - 0941 AM.

  • 0

#3989 Panzermann

Panzermann

    REFORGER '79

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,695 posts

Posted 12 July 2019 - 1300 PM

 

 

My favourite doublespeak from a British politician. 'Economical with the actualité'. Alan Clarke I think.

 

doublespeak? More like non-speak. I have no idea what he is saying.

 

 

Well, he was half speaking in French.

 

 

 

Yes, but it does not mean truth. Not really. More like currentness. News really. French cinema weekly news shows were known as actualité. The DDR1 TV news was named Aktuelle Kamera. The truth of the reports were uhm rather questionable though. With Stuart's further context I get, that alan Clark was grasping for a synonym. But he imho failed in picking one.

 

Merriam-Wbster lists actuality as related to the word truth, but it is not a synonym. https://www.merriam-...thesaurus/truth

 

 

As you can tell, that sentence really threw me off.  ;)  


  • 0

#3990 sunday

sunday

    Bronze-age right-wing delusional retard

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12,036 posts

Posted 12 July 2019 - 1312 PM

Curiously, there is a Spanish term, actualidad, that is a 1:1 match for that French one. In one dictionary, one English translation for the Spanish term is "current affairs".


  • 0

#3991 Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe

    purposeful grimace

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,285 posts

Posted 14 July 2019 - 1137 AM

When they get this going, I hope DNA testing can indicate the relative percentage of Norman vs Anglo-Saxon ancestry;

 

https://www.spectato...orman-conquest/

 

Cambridge University, which still drips with Norman money and influence, should now consider to what extent it needs to compensate its Anglo-Saxon victims. The Sutton Trust estimates that Oxbridge graduates earn £400,000 more during their lifetimes than graduates from other UK universities. These figures imply that descendants of the rapacious Norman invader class could be earning tens of thousands of pounds more than other graduates — an undeserved lifetime premium that has survived 31 generations.  So, reparations must certainly be made.  But who shall pay, and who shall receive?

 

Of course, in Britain one Royal Commission is unlikely to be sufficient. Once the Anglo-Saxon population has been compensated, surviving descendants of the ancient Britons will understandably want to seek redress from the Anglo-Saxons themselves for crimes committed during that earlier settlement. Justice must be served, even if it means even more public money disappearing over the Severn Bridge into Wales. But hopefully it will be made up for by the billions we are owed by present-day Scandinavians in compensation for all that rape and pillage by the Vikings.

 

Lets hope HMG builds a web-based registry so my reparation checks have a correct delivery address.


  • 0

#3992 Ssnake

Ssnake

    Virtual Shiva Beast

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 6,869 posts

Posted 14 July 2019 - 1156 AM

For all I know I might be the descendant of a Briton or Anglo-saxon woman abducted by Danish viking crime lords. Do I have to register before Brexit occurs or can I file my legal status as a potential paleo rape victim later? But then again, how do we determine my victim grade? After all, if my hypothetical grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-mother was raped by Danish gangsters and her daughters were raped too, and their daughters as well, the oppressor genes must have accumulated over time. Ergo, the more Danish DNA, the bigger my victim status. Right?

Right?


  • 0

#3993 Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe

    purposeful grimace

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,285 posts

Posted 14 July 2019 - 1217 PM

Obviously we will need a large, well-paid bureaucracy to administer all this. Universities will need to add Reparation Studies majors to produce enough woke graduates to staff those institutions.


  • 0

#3994 Brian Kennedy

Brian Kennedy

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 5,458 posts

Posted 14 July 2019 - 1223 PM

The funniest part about the reparations debate is that black people look on it less favorably than Woke white people. :) 


  • 0

#3995 urbanoid

urbanoid

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 5,412 posts

Posted 23 July 2019 - 0714 AM

16f37y.jpg


  • 0

#3996 Markus Becker

Markus Becker

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 4,006 posts

Posted 23 July 2019 - 0744 AM

Oh, the fun times we are headed for. The MSM will go into full meltdown mode ... and that's before Boris and Donald meet. :) :) 


  • 0

#3997 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55,776 posts

Posted 23 July 2019 - 0754 AM

160000 Tories decide the future of a continent. You really couldnt make it up.


  • 0

#3998 urbanoid

urbanoid

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 5,412 posts

Posted 23 July 2019 - 0804 AM

160000 Tories decide the future of a continent. You really couldnt make it up.

 

You're a bit overdramatic now. No, it wasn't '160000 Tories', it was the majority of those who voted both for the Tories and for Brexit.

 

I don't like the idea of Brexit too much*, but that's what the people decided and it should be respected.

 

*because it means that Berlin and Paris will have even more influence in the EU and they'll be free to reshape it the was as they see fit


  • 0

#3999 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55,776 posts

Posted 23 July 2019 - 0810 AM

 

160000 Tories decide the future of a continent. You really couldnt make it up.

 

You're a bit overdramatic now. No, it wasn't '160000 Tories', it was the majority of those who voted both for the Tories and for Brexit.

 

I don't like the idea of Brexit too much*, but that's what the people decided and it should be respected.

 

*because it means that Berlin and Paris will have even more influence in the EU and they'll be free to reshape it the was as they see fit

 

 

Dont think so. You now have the country committed to the most draconian form of Brexit, that was NOT voted for by the 52 percent, and its been decided by actually less than 160000 tories, its actually 92000.

 

When Brexit was held, the assertion was there would be a deal, and it would be the easiest thing in the world. Now we have one of the people saying that it would be easy to get a deal NOW saying that it would be no problem to have a hard Brexit.

Still, i suppose if one rides around in a big red bus with 350 million lies on the side, the truth will always be a stranger.

 

 

Ive said for many years, there should be an election every time there is a leadership contest. This dramatically illustrates why its a good idea. What you have witnessed is no more or less than a right wing putsch. Just wait till you see who they have lined up to be home secretary and you will see exactly what I mean.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 23 July 2019 - 0812 AM.

  • 0

#4000 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55,776 posts

Posted 23 July 2019 - 0818 AM

And just to illustrate Britain is becoming more and more like a rejected Monty Python Sketch...

https://www.msn.com/...ID=ansmsnnews11

 

Theresa May last night pressed ahead with plans for a tax on milkshakes - even though Boris Johnson has warned it will be scrapped if he gets into Number Ten.

In one of her final acts, the Prime Minister published proposals to extend the levy on sugary drinks to milkshakes.

Mr Johnson has promised to halt the rollout of so-called ‘sin taxes’ if, as expected, he is elected Tory leader this morning.

 

The frontrunner specifically took aim at the extra charge on milkshakes during his campaign, warning earlier this month that it would ‘clobber’ the poor.

The publication of the green paper last night - just hours before the new leader is announced - came after an extraordinary row between Mrs May and Health Secretary Matt Hancock.

Mr Hancock, one of Mr Johnson’s leading supporters, had argued that the paper should be put on hold until a new prime minister is in place.

An ally of Mr Hancock’s said he believed it would be better for the proposals to be published by the next administration ‘so they actually happen rather than get put out in the dying days of this government’.

 

The source added: ‘Matt’s view was that the paper was not time critical so should be held so it is not seen as her thing and then killed off by Boris.

‘Just last week all departments got advice from No10 saying they should not put out new policies this week that bind the hands of the new government.

‘But Number Ten said it wanted to put it out and for it to be seen as part of her legacy, so they forced it through.’


  • 0