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The Crisis Of Plastic Model Industry


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#61 DougRichards

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 0153 AM

In Sydney, a city of 4.5 million, give or take, there is one shop, with two outlets, selling plastic kits.  Nearby, well a few hours drive away, there is one large retailer of kits in Newcastle, a city of about .6 of a million, that seems mainly to survive by on line sales.  Melbourne, with a population of 4.3 million, has just two retailers of plastic kits.  (Mind you, the same comparisons can be made for train sets and the like). 

 

There are a few other retailers in outlying areas, but no where near what things were like even in the 1990s.


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#62 Mr King

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Posted 13 December 2018 - 1955 PM

Saw this on Facebook, all the military models were done on a 3D printer. Does not bode well for the future of modeling companies. 

 

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#63 bojan

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Posted 13 December 2018 - 2129 PM

PLA ones are still crap, resin ones OTOH...

Unless you are making proprietary models you might as well as get out of business in a few years.


Edited by bojan, 13 December 2018 - 2130 PM.

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#64 DougRichards

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Posted 14 December 2018 - 0110 AM

It is not the arrival at the destination that matters.

 

It is the journey.

 

Except some model companies make the journey harder than it has to be.

 

If all anyone wanted was the finished product, then there are many finished models on the market.


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#65 bojan

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Posted 14 December 2018 - 0947 AM

Thing is that most people want something that assembles easy and looks "OKish".

Big companies can survive, smaller ones not.


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#66 DougRichards

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Posted 18 December 2018 - 0306 AM

Some companies have found a sweet spot between being 'just okay' and 'damn, I have just opened the box and I have no chance of building this'.

 

Airfix has been doing well lately, releasing a good number of kits steadily.  Tamiya is doing what it can to fill in gaps.  Academy is beginning to re-release old kits after a pause.


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#67 DougRichards

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 2151 PM

One of the real reasons for the demise of plastic modelling.

 

https://www.abc.net....-teens/10675880

 

Instant gratification behind teen anxiety epidemic, but parents can help

At a school in Perth, a group of teen girls is sitting in a circle, practising breathing techniques. One. Two. Three. Four.

"I've only got a couple of minutes with them,'' a school counsellor tells me later. Why? Because if this cohort can't learn to slow-breathe in two minutes, they'll consider they've failed.

Failed breathing? It seems risible, but this is a telling example of how the curse of instant gratification is colouring our teens' lives.

In an instant we all can — and expect to — do our banking, book a holiday online, or check a medical diagnosis. Success needs to be now. We don't have time to wait, or waste. And nowhere has instant gratification found a more welcome home than in the teenage world of touchscreen and WiFi, of devices and apps, of television on demand, music in the pocket, and 24/7 connectivity.

The Perth example is one of dozens I've encountered since writing Being 14, which charts the challenges faced by teen girls, and how the rest of us might help them. Often we — their parents — are feeding on the same diet of instant gratification: sprinting through the doors at Boxing Day sales, or cursing the slow driver in front of us.

 

snip

 

Tell the story of the photograph

Schools are helping our teen girls navigate this anxiety by offering yoga and meditation and lessons in mindfulness. But the disease of instant gratification starts being cured at home, where hard work, failing and then succeeding and setting goals are talked about and role-modelled.

Professor Ian Frazer co-invented the science behind the cervical cancer vaccine, which saves millions of women's lives. But success came after a decade of failed experiments. Ask your teen daughters: what would have happen if he'd given up after one year? Or even nine?

 

Or tell them how photographs were taken when you were their age. Remember? Firstly, we needed to adjust the focus because that was not automatic. And then we would snap a photo and put the camera away.

 

Why, they ask? Because we had to wait to take another 11, or 23 or 35 photos, before we could develop them. Then, when the film was full, we'd open the door (that's right) of the camera and remove it.

 

I've relayed this story — given to me by a teen psychologist — in dozens of schools now, and it's the next line that's the clincher. We'd then take the film to the pharmacy to be developed.

It's only a story, but it's a reminder that memories are built up over time, and not everything needs to be uploaded in an instant.

But when we returned for the photographs, a week or so later, we'd carry two things: money to pay for them (which meant we thought about those we were taking) and a delightful sense of anticipation.

 

Instant gratification has stolen that feeling from so many of our children. We need to help gift it back.


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#68 nitflegal

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 1152 AM

One of the real reasons for the demise of plastic modelling.

 

https://www.abc.net....-teens/10675880

 

Instant gratification behind teen anxiety epidemic, but parents can help

At a school in Perth, a group of teen girls is sitting in a circle, practising breathing techniques. One. Two. Three. Four.

"I've only got a couple of minutes with them,'' a school counsellor tells me later. Why? Because if this cohort can't learn to slow-breathe in two minutes, they'll consider they've failed.

Failed breathing? It seems risible, but this is a telling example of how the curse of instant gratification is colouring our teens' lives.

In an instant we all can — and expect to — do our banking, book a holiday online, or check a medical diagnosis. Success needs to be now. We don't have time to wait, or waste. And nowhere has instant gratification found a more welcome home than in the teenage world of touchscreen and WiFi, of devices and apps, of television on demand, music in the pocket, and 24/7 connectivity.

The Perth example is one of dozens I've encountered since writing Being 14, which charts the challenges faced by teen girls, and how the rest of us might help them. Often we — their parents — are feeding on the same diet of instant gratification: sprinting through the doors at Boxing Day sales, or cursing the slow driver in front of us.

 

snip

 

Tell the story of the photograph

Schools are helping our teen girls navigate this anxiety by offering yoga and meditation and lessons in mindfulness. But the disease of instant gratification starts being cured at home, where hard work, failing and then succeeding and setting goals are talked about and role-modelled.

Professor Ian Frazer co-invented the science behind the cervical cancer vaccine, which saves millions of women's lives. But success came after a decade of failed experiments. Ask your teen daughters: what would have happen if he'd given up after one year? Or even nine?

 

Or tell them how photographs were taken when you were their age. Remember? Firstly, we needed to adjust the focus because that was not automatic. And then we would snap a photo and put the camera away.

 

Why, they ask? Because we had to wait to take another 11, or 23 or 35 photos, before we could develop them. Then, when the film was full, we'd open the door (that's right) of the camera and remove it.

 

I've relayed this story — given to me by a teen psychologist — in dozens of schools now, and it's the next line that's the clincher. We'd then take the film to the pharmacy to be developed.

It's only a story, but it's a reminder that memories are built up over time, and not everything needs to be uploaded in an instant.

But when we returned for the photographs, a week or so later, we'd carry two things: money to pay for them (which meant we thought about those we were taking) and a delightful sense of anticipation.

 

Instant gratification has stolen that feeling from so many of our children. We need to help gift it back.

I see these stories constantly and while I think there are elements of truth in them, they miss other aspects that run counter to the narrative.  Both of my girls and their friends still draw and paint and wander outside for 2 hours to walk to the fro-yo shop while babbling away.  Less so than they did in my day because they are on their electronics more than we were (considering we had hand helds and eventually a coveted Atari 2600 we didn't have their opportunity!) and that concerns me.  However, have these people watched what they do on the things?  My youngest spent longer on a detailed construction in Minecraft than I do on my average tank model.  They spend hours designing cities and destroying them or create intricate webs of relationships and houses in the SIMs.  Or they play a single player campaign in AC Odyssey (my eldest) while tracking stats and grinding quests and so forth.  Whether their prolonged creativity moving from the physical to the digital realm is a good thing or not I don't know.  However, to go down the road of these alarmist papers and state that they are all magpies flitting from shiny thing to shiny thing is myopic. 

 

I am more worried about the loss of physical interactions in favor of sedentary ones than some loss of focus and creativity.  I don't know about everyone else, but while I spent time building models and wrestling and playing soccer and getting my ass kicked in karate, an awful lot of my time was spent just bullshitting with my friends in a backyard or while walking in the woods.  These articles make it sound like kids of my generation were spending 10 hours a day painting or rock climbing instead of watching TV with their friends and eating Hostess products with breaks to beat the crap out of each other or get driven to football practice. . .


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