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Ww2 Infantry - Fire Support?


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#761 DougRichards

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 0350 AM

When Britain fi-i-irst, at heaven's command, Aro-o-o-o-ose from out the a-a-a-zure main, Arose, arose from out the azure main, This was the charter, the charter of the land, And guardian a-a-angels sang this strain: Rule Britannia! Britannia rule the waves Britons never, never, never shall be slaves. Rule Britannia! Britannia rule the waves. Britons never, never, never shall be slaves. Still more maje-e-estic shalt thou rise, More dre-e-e-e-eadful from each foreign stroke, More dreadful, dreadful from each foreign stroke, Loud blast above us, loud blast that tears the skies Serves but to ro-o-o-ot thy native oak. Rule Britannia! Britannia rule the waves. Britons never, never, never shall be slaves. Rule Britannia! Britannia rule the waves. Britons never, never, never shall be slaves.


Edited by DougRichards, 26 January 2014 - 0351 AM.

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#762 mnm

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 1709 PM

Strange cameltoe in 0:29.


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#763 sunday

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 1803 PM

True old nations have lyricsless national anthems. :P


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#764 RETAC21

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 1435 PM

Lyricless national anthems composed by Germans...


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#765 sunday

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 1943 PM

Details, details...


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#766 richard g

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 1735 PM

Someone argued way back in this thread somewhere that a 25pdr armed fixed top was never going to happen early on because of a British shortage of 25pdr guns, particularly for such a purpose. Maybe but such a shortage was not inevitable and could have been averted if the British had looked to the Empire early on for cooperation in manufacturing arms and munitions, like I believe they did in WW1 with Canada. By WW2 Australia had developed a capability to manufacture the full range of British land weapons including the 25pdr. For it's own forseeable threat purposes it relied on the 18pdrs it already had left over from WW1 so the 25pdr was not a priority for it's own defence at that time. So there was a lead time involved with the 25pdr which may not have existed if the British had cooperated with other capable members of the Empire in arms and munitions procurement.

Britain did eventually place an order with Australia for 25pdrs but even then only after it was informed that there was an excess capacity available for basically whatever they wanted. That excess capacity remained but varied throughout the war despite exports to other Empire members.
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#767 Colin

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 2046 PM

Canada struggled to make tanks mainly as most of the casting had to be done at the Montreal locomotive works as I recall. I suspect the machining and welding capacity was there to make 2 and 6pdrs in fair quantity, But our industrial base was not overly broad and struggled throughtout the war to meet demand. Had more thought been given to the impending conflict in 1936-7, increasing that capacity by buying American industrial equipment might have helped. 

 

buying design like the US M2 would have worked, not many big plates of armour and lot of welding and riveting, even the 6 ton would have fitted into the more cottage sized industries. Inglis who made a lot of small arms was a dishwasher maker prior to the war.


Edited by Colin, 31 January 2014 - 2048 PM.

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#768 Shortround6

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 2244 PM

The US had to resort  to rail car and locomotive shops for initial tank production. American Car and Foundry built many of the early light tanks. While the Chrysler run Detroit Tank Arsenal did make M3 mediums ALCO (American Locomotive Company), Pressed Steel Car Company, Pullman Standard Company and Baldwin Locomotive helped make up initial production. Lima Locomotive works and  Pacific car and Foundry joined in for Sherman production along with several more purpose built tank factories.

 

There is little sense in trying to build tanks in cottage sized industries. You wind up with a lot people working very hard to make substandard vehicles. Let the cottage industries do what they do best. Build small component parts like bushings, gears, linkages, or other semi-precision stuff. (My grandfather worked for a 4 man shop equipped with overhead belt machinery that made gyro-scopes under subcontract to Norden).

 

The railroad shops have the machinery of the size needed for dealing with tanks. If they can handle 60-80ft passenger cars that could weigh 80 tons then handling tanks wasn't a problem. Locomotives were a lot heavier. The number of industries that require 15-50 ton over head cranes and 30-40ft ceilings is really rather small. You cannot build tanks in car factories or even most truck factories. 

 

DP-Army-Tanks-M3-General-Grant-29.jpg

 

In some extreme cases the US industry just shuttered some existing factories and moved the work force to a new, nearby building that was equipped to build the item/s needed rather than try to modify-rebuild an old factory with too small infrastructure (traveling-over head cranes, power supplies, overhead clearance,etc.  


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#769 zaevor2000

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 1454 PM

fyi...

From Tigers in the Mud by Otto Carius (one of the top Tiger aces in WW2”
Chapter “Operation Strachwitz”
p. 104-105

“In the days preceding the attack, the commander’s aide had to find out at what minute in the morning it became light enough to properly see and shoot. The exact time of the attack was based on this determination.
The preparatory fire was supposed to start 5 minutes before the attack, and it was supposed to be shifted after another 5 minutes. By the end of the first 5 minutes, we were supposed to have already crossed the rail embankment.
Shortly before the attack began, the Graf came to us with his traditional thin walking stick to observe the breakthrough from our position. We then experienced a barrage of fire such as we never again saw during the remainder of the war. 37mm rapid-fire Flak guns, 20mm Quads, and 88mm Flak guns were set up in a half-circle around the “east sack”.
The fired with tracers, which formed an actual dome of fire we could drive under to reach the southern edge of the dome. A rocket regiment fired from farther to the rear, first with Napalm rockets and then with high explosive munitions. The effect was devastating, as we were able to determine later. It should be noted that the low-hanging woods in the marshes didn’t allow any pressure to escape upward. The flames thus scorched the trees for a height of several meters. All Russians who weren’t in the bunkers were immediately killed by the concussion. At the same time, howitzer and artillery units, including 280mm howitzers, fired everything they had….”

...just thought this would be a good contribution to this thread.

Frank
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