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For Stuart Galbraith And Anyone Into Bizarre Rail Safety Vids


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#2521 Panzermann

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 0958 AM

 

Monorail!


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#2522 Panzermann

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 1016 AM

 

no rails involved, but with steam and the trailer and tractors are very long.


Edited by Panzermann, 12 October 2019 - 1017 AM.

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#2523 Roman Alymov

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 0643 AM

DIY steamer


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#2524 Colin

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 1222 PM

That's a cool little steam engine!


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#2525 Mobius

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 1654 PM

Here is a few he unwrapped and already in the sim.

 

111019_10.jpg

 

111019_11.jpg

 

 

And this is a war deparment 2-8-0 Austerity, as used by the British Army in WW2.

111019_1.jpg

 

 

https://victoryworksts.blogspot.com/

Did British carriages have spoked wheels during the war?  I know Russian carriages did.  I made a 3D computer model heavy duty flat car that had 4 2 wheel trucks for the Stalingrad rail yard.


Edited by Mobius, 13 October 2019 - 1700 PM.

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#2526 rmgill

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 2219 PM

Shouldn't the air intakes on the Churchill be off the tank and chained to the engine track return covers?

17420_a014_a014001331.jpg​


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#2527 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 0153 AM

Shouldn't the air intakes on the Churchill be off the tank and chained to the engine track return covers?

17420_a014_a014001331.jpg​

 

Thats a good point, I hadnt thought of it. The problem is that its a bought model that he applied to his flats, so it was probably intended for simulation games or something. Ill mention to him, im not sure there is much he can do right now. Thanks for that one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Did British carriages have spoked wheels during the war?  I know Russian carriages did.  I made a 3D computer model heavy duty flat car that had 4 2 wheel trucks for the Stalingrad rail yard.

 

 

Yeah, the freight stuff usually did. Im not quite so certain about carrage wheels, I would have to check on that. Probably, I dont believe we had disc breaking until the 1960's or 70's on carriages.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 14 October 2019 - 0154 AM.

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#2528 Mobius

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 1201 PM

 

 


17420_a014_a014001331.jpg​

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Did British carriages have spoked wheels during the war?  I know Russian carriages did.  I made a 3D computer model heavy duty flat car that had 4 2 wheel trucks for the Stalingrad rail yard.

 

 

Yeah, the freight stuff usually did. Im not quite so certain about carrage wheels, I would have to check on that. Probably, I dont believe we had disc breaking until the 1960's or 70's on carriages.

 

Those carriage trucks look tike the ones I made for the 4 truck 200ton heavy Russian flat car.   I didn't realize that design was all over Europe during WII.


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#2529 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 1219 PM

its just about possible they were built abroad, or at the very least licensed.Gloucester Carriage and Wagon works made stuff for numerous railways and different gauges.

 

https://en.wikipedia...d_Wagon_Company


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#2530 rmgill

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 1336 PM

Also, spoked wheels, but not a center drop flat. Also, Janney coupler, link/hook AND buffers. 

17420_a014_a014001316.jpg

Solid wheels:
http://media.gettyim...62099?s=612x612


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#2531 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 1346 PM

Some of these may actually date from Ww1. If they were in fact that old, you would expect a variety in specification.
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#2532 Panzermann

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 1433 PM

Some of these may actually date from Ww1. If they were in fact that old, you would expect a variety in specification.

 

I guess they just took what was available in flat cars of any type. there are heavy freights to trsnsdport in peace time, too.

 

 

That car in the photo posted by rmgill is weird with the two coupling systems. why is that? Janney couplers re rarely used in europe. Or is it a SA-3 coupler and this car is meant to go on russian and standard gauge?


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#2533 Rick

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 1626 PM

its just about possible they were built abroad, or at the very least licensed.Gloucester Carriage and Wagon works made stuff for numerous railways and different gauges.

 

https://en.wikipedia...d_Wagon_Company

Speaking of gauges, did I remember correctly that the English and or American gauge was the width of a horse-drawn wagon?


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#2534 Mobius

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Posted 15 October 2019 - 1747 PM

 

Some of these may actually date from Ww1. If they were in fact that old, you would expect a variety in specification.

 

I guess they just took what was available in flat cars of any type. there are heavy freights to trsnsdport in peace time, too.

 

And there it is.  It looks like it is hauling some sort of pump or pipe sections.

8f77cb8df9c7f2344672cc004783a890.jpg


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#2535 Panzermann

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 0921 AM

 

its just about possible they were built abroad, or at the very least licensed.Gloucester Carriage and Wagon works made stuff for numerous railways and different gauges.

 

https://en.wikipedia...d_Wagon_Company

Speaking of gauges, did I remember correctly that the English and or American gauge was the width of a horse-drawn wagon?

 

 

The width goes back to antique roman carriages, because they had rails in their paved streets for them. So two horse butts next to each other limit the size of tanks. Or space rockets. Or steam boilers.

 

though wikipedia casts some doubt on it: https://en.wikipedia...railway#Origins

 

because about five feet width is a common width for carriages. And horse butts have not changed that much I guess.


Edited by Panzermann, 19 October 2019 - 0921 AM.

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#2536 Panzermann

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Posted 20 October 2019 - 2318 PM

 

 

And that little children is why railway tracks and the area around them is no trespass territory. He should thank the man on the loco kicking him.


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#2537 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 0201 AM

 

its just about possible they were built abroad, or at the very least licensed.Gloucester Carriage and Wagon works made stuff for numerous railways and different gauges.

 

https://en.wikipedia...d_Wagon_Company

Speaking of gauges, did I remember correctly that the English and or American gauge was the width of a horse-drawn wagon?

 

 

Track gauge, yeah. Its defined by a horses arse. Or more accurately, the cart they pulled was defined by the shafts, which were defined by the width of the horse. Supposedly it  wore a rut that was 4 foot 8 IIRC. That was the gauge used by horse drown colliery's, which were the starting point for steam hauled ones in Stephensons case.

 

Some of the European gauges are different, largely because they didnt want to make it difficult for invaders. And of course there was the far sighted 'Broad Gauge', the Betamax video recorder of the day. That was 7 foot. It makes you wonder how more efficient railways would be today if he had been listened to.

Baulk_road_point_with_side_step.jpg


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 21 October 2019 - 0202 AM.

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