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Elections, Elections, Elections


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#1161 Markus Becker

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 0024 AM

So far it looks like the German MSM has once again fallen victim to their anti conservative bias as Likud is once again ahead. Edit: The gap is narrowing with 44% of the votes counted.

Dishonorable mention to Der Tagesspiegel, who included the Arab parties in the centre left block. Out of ignorance or to make this block look as strong as the center right is everyone's guess.

Edited by Markus Becker, 18 September 2019 - 0236 AM.

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#1162 BansheeOne

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 0402 AM

Well, so far it seems like the same deadlock as last time, with the same mutually exclusive rule-outs for possible coalition partners making it hard to find a majority for a government.

11:45 | 09/18/19

ISRAEL ELECTIONS RESULTS BASED ON COUNTED BALLOTS 11.22 A.M.

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF

At 11.39 a.m., 3,854,568 votes had been counted or 60.28% of the casted ballots.

The Central Election Committee published the first results based on counted votes. At 11.39 a.m., 3,854,568 votes had been counted or 60.28% of the casted ballots.

The current official results:

Blue and White: 26.34%

Likud: 25.68%

Shas: 8.47%

The Joint List: 7.72%

Yisrael Beytenu: 7.26%

UTJ: 6.47%

Yamina: 6.92%

Labor-Gesher: 4.90%

Democratic Union: 4.40%

Otzma Yehudit: 1.93% (did not pass the electoral threshold which is 3.25%)

[...]


https://m.jpost.com/...ts-12-am-602045

Edited by BansheeOne, 18 September 2019 - 0405 AM.

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#1163 Rick

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 0446 AM

Not a follower of foreign affairs, but I do have a question. In Germany, it appears that there are several political parties. Do the various political parties form temporary alliance with other political parties to "get what they want?" Is this true with other European countries?

Thank you.


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#1164 BansheeOne

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 0505 AM

Coalition governments are the order of the day in European countries which don't have a first-past-the-post system in parliamentary elections. While it also happens once in a while in the latter, like currently in the UK, systems stressing national popular vote results are friendlier towards smaller and new parties, leading to a more diverse representation in parliament at the cost of the usual big two.

While the German Conservatives very nearly scored an absolute majority in the 2013 elections, that hasn't actually happened at the national level since 1963. At this point, party systems are often so differentiated that it can be hard to form governments of enough parties agreeing on common aims. See the current examples of Spain and Israel, or recent German state elections.
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#1165 Rick

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 0513 AM

Coalition governments are the order of the day in European countries which don't have a first-past-the-post system in parliamentary elections. While it also happens once in a while in the latter, like currently in the UK, systems stressing national popular vote results are friendlier towards smaller and new parties, leading to a more diverse representation in parliament at the cost of the usual big two.

While the German Conservatives very nearly scored an absolute majority in the 2013 elections, that hasn't actually happened at the national level since 1963. At this point, party systems are often so differentiated that it can be hard to form governments of enough parties agreeing on common aims. See the current examples of Spain and Israel, or recent German state elections.

Would it be accurate to say that "German Conservatives" do not resemble their American counterparts? For example, less government and lower taxes? From previous posts, it appears Christianity does not play a role in German politics?


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#1166 Panzermann

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 0535 AM

Well 
 

Would it be accurate to say that "German Conservatives" do not resemble their American counterparts? For example, less government and lower taxes? From previous posts, it appears Christianity does not play a role in German politics?


Well, the political party with the highest results most of the time is still the CDU (Christain Democratic Union) and its bavarian sister CSU (christian Social Union). Both both do normally not put christianity front and centre in every speech. In their party programmes they refer christian values and sometimes in speeches. But not as prominent as US politicians do. There are even atheists and muslims in the CDU as it is not a requirement for membership. It is just not put as prominent in public as in the US. See also Stuart's elaborates on how this is similar in the UK treated as a private matter. e.g. only a few days ago I have learned that  May is a vicar's daughter. 

 

 

There are exceptions of course, former Federal President of Germany Johannes Rau has been nicknamed "Saint John", because he was a known religious SPD man for example and sometimes quoting the bible or some long dead monk. 

 

 

In regards to lower taxes they love to talk about it, but in reality the last raise of VAT has been done by the CDU, while the SPD in coalition with them then wanted -1%. The CDU wanted +2%. Result was +3% VAT. Government math.

 

The CDU/CSU love to talk about lean state and the "black zero", but that leads to crumbling infrastructure and PPP "private public partnership" projects, that actually cost much more in the end. Throwing more bureaucracy and regulations your way both big parties are good with.


Edited by Panzermann, 18 September 2019 - 0542 AM.

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#1167 BansheeOne

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 0600 AM

CDU/CSU officially base themselves on three, sometimes contradictory traditions: Political conservativism, classical pro-market liberalism, and Christian ethics, particularly the social teachings. Their conservative wing has actually withered away to the point where the remainders have organized themselves in dedicated groups like the Berlin Circle and the Values Union; yet they are still frequently referred to as "the Conservatives" to describe their position in the German party system, particularly to foreigners (I should really stop doing that myself though, since it creates more confusion than understanding).

There are some explicitely Christian-based fringe parties like the Party of Bible-abiding Christians, but the influence of faith in politics is more through individuals throughout the major parties. Several MPs in CDU/CSU and the Greens spring to mind as practicing-to-evangelical Christians.
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#1168 Rick

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 0609 AM

Well 
 

Would it be accurate to say that "German Conservatives" do not resemble their American counterparts? For example, less government and lower taxes? From previous posts, it appears Christianity does not play a role in German politics?


Well, the political party with the highest results most of the time is still the CDU (Christain Democratic Union) and its bavarian sister CSU (christian Social Union). Both both do normally not put christianity front and centre in every speech. In their party programmes they refer christian values and sometimes in speeches. But not as prominent as US politicians do. There are even atheists and muslims in the CDU as it is not a requirement for membership. It is just not put as prominent in public as in the US. See also Stuart's elaborates on how this is similar in the UK treated as a private matter. e.g. only a few days ago I have learned that  May is a vicar's daughter. 

 

 

There are exceptions of course, former Federal President of Germany Johannes Rau has been nicknamed "Saint John", because he was a known religious SPD man for example and sometimes quoting the bible or some long dead monk. 

 

 

In regards to lower taxes they love to talk about it, but in reality the last raise of VAT has been done by the CDU, while the SPD in coalition with them then wanted -1%. The CDU wanted +2%. Result was +3% VAT. Government math.

 

The CDU/CSU love to talk about lean state and the "black zero", but that leads to crumbling infrastructure and PPP "private public partnership" projects, that actually cost much more in the end. Throwing more bureaucracy and regulations your way both big parties are good with.

Thank you Panzermann. Your posts and similar posts by our European posters are the main reason why I do not pay much attention to what is in the news in the U.S. regarding foreign affairs. 


Edited by Rick, 18 September 2019 - 0610 AM.

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#1169 DB

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 1051 AM

Understanding the differences between what is considered left and right in Europe compared to the US is key to understanding the misunderstandings whenever politics is discussed across the Atlantic.
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#1170 Markus Becker

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 1211 PM

Would it be accurate to say that "German Conservatives" do not resemble their American counterparts? For example, less government and lower taxes? 

 

They are the opposite! More regulation and sure as hell no lower taxes but right now a new carbon tax. 

 

 

From previous posts, it appears Christianity does not play a role in German politics?

 

 

Not at all any more. Today only one religion dominates politics. The one that has nothing to do with anything negative. 

 

 

 

Do the various political parties form temporary alliance with other political parties to "get what they want?"

 

Yes and what they want is just power. Topics wise aside from the Commies and the AfD they are more or less the same on all major issues: immigration, energy and EU/Euro. 


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#1171 Markus Becker

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 1217 PM

Well, so far it seems like the same deadlock as last time, with the same mutually exclusive rule-outs for possible coalition partners making it hard to find a majority for a government.
 

 

 

The radio news keeps displaying their ignorance or bias or both. They kept referring to to Israeli Arabs as Palestineans and went on about them joining a government and restarting the two state peace process. At that point even their CDU interviewee gave them a small dose of reality. Not the full one, that these parties are hard core anti Israel and would like their nominal country to cease existing the sooner the better. 


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#1172 BansheeOne

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 1417 PM

Poland also can into elections.

Poland's PiS pledges more spending ahead of parliamentary election

(Reuters) - Poland's ruling Law and Justice party (PiS) has pledged to provide at least 1 billion zlotys ($250 million) for companies adding to a list of expensive promises ahead of next month's parliamentary elections.

PiS, which came to power in 2015 since when it has led in opinion polls on the back of social spending policies, has been accused by opposition parties of buying support.

"For all companies, including small and medium ones, which want to invest in innovative processes, we will provide...more than 1 billion zlotys," Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki told a televised party meeting in Katowice, southern Poland, on Saturday.

He also presented plans for tax relief for the smallest companies.

Poland will hold its parliamentary election on Oct. 13, which most pollsters expect PiS to win due to its generous social spending and robust economic growth.

In February, PiS pledged to increase public spending by up to $10 billion a year, raising child subsidies, state pensions and transport infrastructure.

This month it offered regular annual cash bonuses to pensioners and said it would almost double the minimum wage.

"Even lower taxes, even more money for investment," said Morawiecki. "It is some cost for the budget, but we will bear this cost as we have an efficient and fair state and well-managed public finances."

PiS is aiming to eliminate a budget deficit next year for the first time since 1990, in a move that could help bolster public support for its ambitious social spending plans and other promises.

Critics say the budget targets are too optimistic against the background of an expected economic slowdown.


https://www.reuters....s-idUSKBN1W60BG
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#1173 BansheeOne

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Posted 29 September 2019 - 0431 AM

Machen wir's Kurz. ;)

 

September 29, 2019 / 12:13 AM / Updated 9 hours ago

 

Austria votes in snap parliamentary poll, conservatives seen heading new coalition
 
 
VIENNA (Reuters) - Austrians vote on Sunday in a snap parliamentary election that conservative leader Sebastian Kurz looks set to win, but he will still need a coalition partner to secure a majority and it remains unclear whom he will pick.
 

The election follows the collapse in May of Kurz’s coalition with the far-right Freedom Party (FPO) after a video sting scandal that forced FPO Vice Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache to step down.

 

Kurz, 33, has emerged largely unscathed from the scandal, even gaining voters from the FPO as its support has slipped to roughly a fifth of the electorate from just over a quarter in the last vote in 2017. On the left, there has been some shift in support from the Social Democrats to the resurgent Greens.

 

But the overall picture since the scandal’s immediate aftermath has been remarkably stable. Opinion polls have generally shown Kurz’s People’s Party (OVP) far ahead on roughly a third of the vote, the Social Democrats slightly ahead of the FPO and the Greens a distant fourth.

 

“Lots of agitation, but not much movement,” national broadcaster ORF said on Saturday, summarizing a campaign with many debates between party leaders that failed to make a serious mark on the opinion polls.

 

Kurz has said he will talk to all parties after the election if he wins. His two most likely options are either to ally with the FPO again or with the Greens and liberal Neos. A centrist coalition with the Social Democrats is possible but unlikely under their current leadership.

 

LENGTHY TALKS
 

Surveys suggest the environment is voters’ top concern, which has helped the Greens surge from less than 4% in the last election in 2017, when they crashed out of parliament, to around 13% now.

 

While they might be able to give Kurz and his party a narrow majority in parliament, he is unlikely to want to be at the mercy of a small number of its left-wing lawmakers, meaning that if he chooses to ally with the Greens he will probably seek a three-way tie-up including the pro-business Neos.

 

As the campaign wound up last week, the FPO sought to focus voters’ attention on its core issue of migration, railing against immigrants in general and Muslims in particular, rather than addressing recent scandals that have eroded its support.

 

The widespread assumption among politicians and analysts is that the election will be followed by a long period of coalition talks, meaning the current provisional government of civil servants led by former judge Brigitte Bierlein could remain in place until Christmas or later.

 

Polling stations open at 7 a.m. (0500 GMT) and the first projections are due shortly after voting ends at 5 p.m.

 

https://www.reuters....n-idUSKBN1WD0PV

 

Also, that Transsylvanian coming up for reelection.

 

The 10 people running for president in Romania
 
Anca Alexe 24/09/2019 | 13:27
 

Sunday marked the deadline when contenders in Romania’s upcoming presidential election each had to submit 200,000 signatures supporting their candidacy to the Central Electoral Bureau (BEC). Ten people have managed to collect the required number of signatures.

 

In the past few weeks, more than 20 individuals had stated their intent to run for president, but many failed to get the 200,000 signatures or gave up on the process in the meantime.

 

The campaign officially begins on October 12, though the streets have been filled with banners and ads for several weeks now. The first round of elections will take place on November 10, followed by the run-off between the top two candidates on November 24.

 

The 10 candidates are:

  1. Klaus Iohannis (PNL)

Incumbent Romanian president Klaus Iohannis, who was first elected in 2014 following a runoff contest with then-PM Victor Ponta, is the candidate of the National Liberal Party (PNL). He submitted the largest number of signatures of all this year’s candidates – 2.2 million. Iohannis has led recent opinion polls by a wide margin, with over 40 percent of the voting intentions according to IMAS.

  1. Viorica Dancila (PSD)

The current prime minister of Romania and the leader of the Social Democratic Party, Viorica Dancila, submitted 1.4 million signatures to the BEC last week. The most recent IMAS poll found Dancila with less than 10 percent of support, which could mean that the PSD candidate risks being left out of the second election round for the first time ever.

  1. Dan Barna (USR-PLUS Alliance)

Dan Barna, the head of the Save Romania Union (USR), submitted 400,000 signatures to the BEC on Friday, and accused president Iohannis of not having used all his power to fight against the PSD, saying that Romania needed a change. Polls have put Barna in second place, but at a significant distance from the current president, with less than 20 percent.

 

[...]

 

http://business-revi...-romania-204932


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#1174 TonyE

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Posted 29 September 2019 - 0555 AM

Machen wir's Kurz. ;)

 

September 29, 2019 / 12:13 AM / Updated 9 hours ago

 

Austria votes in snap parliamentary poll, conservatives seen heading new coalition
 

 

Mit Kurz für den Sieg!

When he returns to the Bundeskanzleramt it will be like Napoleon returning from Elba!

cb5019.jpg


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#1175 Adam Peter

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Posted 29 September 2019 - 1307 PM

Hungary gearing up for local city council elections. Our government is true to itself, the ruling party's activist smeared a car with feces, disturbed the opposition's events (one case a police is investigating because the masked individual masked the license plate of the motorboat, too)...

 

... but the icing of the cake happened in Szekszárd, where the opposition got permissions to advertise themselves on posters in the city only after the elections :D


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#1176 Panzermann

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 0916 AM

@Adam Peter: now that is a properly guided democracy!


[ħr]
 

 

Machen wir's Kurz. ;)
 

September 29, 2019 / 12:13 AM / Updated 9 hours ago
 
Austria votes in snap parliamentary poll, conservatives seen heading new coalition

 

 
Mit Kurz für den Sieg!
When he returns to the Bundeskanzleramt it will be like Napoleon returning from Elba!
https://www.srf.ch/s...news/cb5019.jpg

 



Kurz gesagt, Kurz can now choose who he wants to form a coalition with. Greens, FPÖ or SPÖ. Very comfortable position after these preliminary results:

ÖVP (austrian people party, conservatives) 38,35% (+6,88)
SPÖ (austrian social democrats) 21,54% (-5,32)
FPÖ (astrian libertarian(?) party, right wing populist actually) 17,25 (-8,72)
NEOS (- The New Austria and Liberal Forum, centrists) 7,36% (+2,06)
JETZT (Liste Pilz, splitters from, the Greens) 1,87% (-2,54)
Greens 12,35% (+8,55)
other 1,26% (-0,94)


Especially nice is Kurz' position with the Greens and SPÖ. The Greens he forces them to choose between saving the climate and kicking out migrants or opposiiton where they can scream about the migrants (not being heard). And if all else fails he has the panicked SPÖ on a leash, because they fear for their sinecures and are fading away. Thus he can also demand anything he likes from the FPÖ, because he has other options.


Edited by Panzermann, 30 September 2019 - 0923 AM.

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#1177 TonyE

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 1110 AM

@Adam Peter: now that is a properly guided democracy!


[ħr]
 

 

Machen wir's Kurz. ;)
 

September 29, 2019 / 12:13 AM / Updated 9 hours ago
 
Austria votes in snap parliamentary poll, conservatives seen heading new coalition

 

 
Mit Kurz für den Sieg!
When he returns to the Bundeskanzleramt it will be like Napoleon returning from Elba!
https://www.srf.ch/s...news/cb5019.jpg

 



Kurz gesagt, Kurz can now choose who he wants to form a coalition with. Greens, FPÖ or SPÖ. Very comfortable position after these preliminary results:
 

 

Best result! :excl:

mElJn2ip_400x400.jpg


Edited by TonyE, 30 September 2019 - 1111 AM.

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#1178 Simon Tan

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 2233 PM

Kurz!
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#1179 TonyE

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 0629 AM

Kurz vs Kramp-Karrenbauer for 2021 would be epic!


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#1180 Simon Tan

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 0704 AM

Anschluss 2 - Rise of the Chancellor.


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