Jump to content


Photo

Because, Russia

Now is time. Here is place

  • Please log in to reply
3581 replies to this topic

#3561 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,513 posts

Posted 17 September 2019 - 1242 PM

You DO know what it was built for Roman? It wasn't for curing diseases.
 

Officially it was exactly what it was created. And they are quite successful in this role, see Russian Ebola research results

 

I hope they got out that business, but after Salisbury I've no confidence.

The same Salisbury where roof is removed after reported contamination of door handle?

 

  P.S. See "Vector" centre webpage http://www.vector.ns...gnts-vb-vektor/


Edited by Roman Alymov, 17 September 2019 - 1243 PM.

  • 0

#3562 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,513 posts

Posted 23 September 2019 - 0025 AM

Usual side efects of mass airdrop: two BMD-2 smashed after their parachutes failed to open. There were no crews inside

https://pbs.twimg.co...CkB?format=jpg

 

More photos here

https://pbs.twimg.co...CkB?format=jpg

 

Video

https://twitter.com/...836810649493505


  • 0

#3563 DougRichards

DougRichards

    Doug Richards

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10,186 posts

Posted 23 September 2019 - 0633 AM

Because Russia, when located somewhere else.

 

Does any other country have similar 'experiences' with Russian diplomats?

 

https://www.abc.net....g-laws/11537306

 

Foreign embassies flout Canberra parking laws, amassing thousands of dollars in unpaid fines

Updated

about 7 hours ago

Foreign diplomats in Canberra owe almost $60,000 in unpaid parking fines, some dating back more than 16 years.

Key points:
  • The ACT Government is still chasing unpaid parking fines from diplomats posted to Canberra in 2003
  • The worst-offending embassy staff are from Russia, Slovakia, Afghanistan and Romania
  • Foreign diplomats are immune from prosecution by Australian authorities but most comply with local laws anyway

 

From parking in spots reserved for medical staff to not paying for parking in ticketed areas, FOI documents released by the ACT Government show foreign embassies have amassed 423 unpaid parking fines.

Envoys from Russia and Slovakia appear to be the most likely to ignore parking laws: the two countries were responsible for half of all unpaid infringements.

Russian embassy staff alone had failed to pay 175 fines, worth more than $23,000.

The embassy has 15 posted officials in Canberra, though their families and staff can also drive their diplomatic vehicles, as is the case with all embassies.

Diplomatic immunity

Under the Vienna convention, emissaries posted to other countries are immune from prosecution by local authorities.

However, the Australian Government asks foreign officials to comply with Australian laws and to follow police directions. Most embassies do, telling their staff to obey traffic rules and pay the penalties if they breach them.

 

 

Parking debt

Unpaid fines issued to diplomatic staff as of September 2019.

 
Russia
$23,099
Slovakia
$4,123
Afghanistan
$3,423
Romania
$3,018
Ghana
$2,332
Nepal
$2,228
Tonga
$1,875
Samoa
$1,580
Jordan
$1,518
other embassies
$14,798

 

 

The protocols that set out how diplomats should behave in Canberra, listed on the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade's (DFAT) website, say police can stop an envoy's vehicle and ask the driver to take a breath test, but police have no power to arrest or detain foreign staff.

Similarly, parking inspectors can issue fines but ACT courts cannot enforce them.

However, police can prevent a diplomat from continuing to drive "if there is a risk to public safety". In that case, the police "should assist respectfully with appropriate arrangements for the person to travel to their destination".

 

Government still chasing fines 16 years later

The 423 unpaid fines cover a range of breaches, from parking without paying to using spots reserved for doctors and drivers with disabilities. Eight of the infringements date back to 2003.

The ACT Government continues to record all infringements and send courtesy letters to the city's embassies, regardless of its inability to demand payment.

A spokesperson said the Government "takes all parking offences seriously and works with relevant embassies and consulates … to rectify outstanding infringements".

 

On Monday, DFAT said it expected all infringements to be paid.

"[DFAT] expects diplomats to obey Australia's laws and to pay fines promptly," a spokesperson said.

"DFAT regularly reminds diplomats they have an obligation to obey Australia's road rules."

The Russian embassy was contacted for comment.


Edited by DougRichards, 23 September 2019 - 0635 AM.

  • 0

#3564 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 54,744 posts

Posted 23 September 2019 - 0636 AM

Just let the air out of their tires. Sooner or later they will get the message.


  • 0

#3565 DougRichards

DougRichards

    Doug Richards

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10,186 posts

Posted 23 September 2019 - 0804 AM

Just let the air out of their tires. Sooner or later they will get the message.

 

Diplomats are full of hot air, they will just breath on the tyres (although Stuart it is interesting that you actually used the American spelling in your post) and the tyres will reinflate.  Anyway, they are diplomats, they don't care if anything they run on (ie flat tyres or policies) have anything to support them.


  • 0

#3566 MiloMorai

MiloMorai

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,915 posts

Posted 23 September 2019 - 1115 AM

Would it be illegal to put on wheel locks?

trimaxtwl100-5.jpg


  • 0

#3567 Colin

Colin

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,949 posts

Posted 23 September 2019 - 1428 PM

If it was a citizens "arrest" or "protest" possibly


  • 0

#3568 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,513 posts

Posted 24 September 2019 - 0025 AM

Just let the air out of their tires. Sooner or later they will get the message.

Well, how about using this tactics in London?

https://www.bloomber...ic-charge-fines

Bloomberg: U.S. Diplomats Top List of Unpaid London Traffic Charge Fines

 

The same mess in other places

https://www.theguard...parking-tickets

The Guardian: A fine mess: how diplomats get away without paying parking tickets

Quote: "One study has suggested – rather bluntly – that the rate at which countries accrue unpaid parking fines in New York correlates well with that country’s own rate of corruption. The study, conducted by the economists Raymond Fisman and Edward Miguel in 2006, found no non-payments from officials in Japan, Canada, Turkey, Sweden or the UK, while the worst offenders were Kuwait, Egypt and Chad. (Kuwaiti diplomats managed a heroic average of 246 parking violations each over a five-year period.)

Interestingly, considering their high corruption scores with Transparency International, both Russia and China had peculiarly honest diplomats. Equally interestingly, the study found better behaviour among diplomats from countries considered friendly with the US; and diplomats in general became more honest, briefly, after the 9/11 attacks."

 

Quotes study https://www.nber.org/papers/w12312.pdfshow it is actually understatement: Rus diplomats got 2 traffic rules violations per diplomat, while another post-Soviet country with the same culture, Ukraine, got 12.9 (6 times more), the same number as Spain (12.7)


  • 0

#3569 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 54,744 posts

Posted 24 September 2019 - 0206 AM

 

Just let the air out of their tires. Sooner or later they will get the message.

 

Diplomats are full of hot air, they will just breath on the tyres (although Stuart it is interesting that you actually used the American spelling in your post) and the tyres will reinflate.  Anyway, they are diplomats, they don't care if anything they run on (ie flat tyres or policies) have anything to support them.

 

 

I have a firefox spell checker which insists on converting everything into amerenglish. Anyway, im TIRED. :D

 

Nick their tires, put them up on blocks. Put in a couple of hungry Koala's in through the sunroof. Fill the fuel tank full of Vegemite. Comeon, you Aussies are some inventive folk, you will figure something out.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 24 September 2019 - 0207 AM.

  • 0

#3570 DougRichards

DougRichards

    Doug Richards

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10,186 posts

Posted 24 September 2019 - 0516 AM

 

 

Just let the air out of their tires. Sooner or later they will get the message.

 

Diplomats are full of hot air, they will just breath on the tyres (although Stuart it is interesting that you actually used the American spelling in your post) and the tyres will reinflate.  Anyway, they are diplomats, they don't care if anything they run on (ie flat tyres or policies) have anything to support them.

 

 

I have a firefox spell checker which insists on converting everything into amerenglish. Anyway, im TIRED. :D

 

Nick their tires, put them up on blocks. Put in a couple of hungry Koala's in through the sunroof. Fill the fuel tank full of Vegemite. Comeon, you Aussies are some inventive folk, you will figure something out.

 

 

The most notable Australian war surgeon on history was Sir Edward Dunlop.  he deserves a sainthood. 

 

https://anzacportal....rd-weary-dunlop

 

As Australians do, he was given a nickname:  Dunlop / tyred / tired / weary....   and the nickname of 'Weary Dunlop' was carried with pride and admiration for decades.  God bless him.


  • 0

#3571 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,513 posts

Posted 14 October 2019 - 1808 PM

Famous Russian war journalist own Youtube channel

https://www.youtube....ZV0_opqw/videos


  • 0

#3572 Rick

Rick

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 4,047 posts

Posted 15 October 2019 - 0349 AM

 

Good God, I didnt know Vector was still open. IIRC, they had a smallpox or anthrax leak back in 1979, killed several dozen people.

See RT report kindly posted here by Panzermann yesterday – it was explosion during paintwork during reconstruction of one of the buildings, no biohazard. Strange you expect one of the leading Russian scientific centers closed – as in fact they are quite successful, including participation in international virus research programs.

https://en.wikipedia...chnology_VECTOR

 

Roman, my understanding is that the Soviet Union committed much talent, time and money into biological and chemical research. Do you know if any of this knowledge has moved into cancer research?


  • 0

#3573 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 54,744 posts

Posted 15 October 2019 - 0353 AM

Roman, I find it amusing you chastise me for assuming Vector should shut its peaceful research, when you steadfastly have refused to believe Porton Down wasnt capable of fulfilling exactly the same role, a good 30 years before your country discovered the hazards of bio weapons.

 

I had assumed Vector shut because the Russian military couldnt afford to sustain it. In that and many things I guess I shouldnt be so surprised.


  • 0

#3574 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,513 posts

Posted 19 October 2019 - 1529 PM

Investing in Russia  road infrastructure


  • 0

#3575 MiloMorai

MiloMorai

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,915 posts

Posted 19 October 2019 - 1615 PM

At least 15 dead, others missing after dam collapse at Russian gold mine

At least 15 people are dead and another 13 missing in Russia after a dam collapsed at a Siberian gold mine, according to reports.

The dam failure resulted in rushing water flooding dormitories of workers as they slept, the Associated Press reported.

The collapse happened after heavy rain near the village of Shchetinkino, in Russia’s Krasnoyarsk region. A criminal investigation into workplace safety violations has been opened, officials say.

“The hydro-technical facility was self-constructed and, I believe, all rules I can and can not think of were violated,” Yuri Lapshin, a regional official told Russia’s RIA news agency, Reuters reported.

https://nypost.com/2...sian-gold-mine/

 

 


  • 0

#3576 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,513 posts

Posted 20 October 2019 - 0916 AM

 

 

Good God, I didnt know Vector was still open. IIRC, they had a smallpox or anthrax leak back in 1979, killed several dozen people.

See RT report kindly posted here by Panzermann yesterday – it was explosion during paintwork during reconstruction of one of the buildings, no biohazard. Strange you expect one of the leading Russian scientific centers closed – as in fact they are quite successful, including participation in international virus research programs.

https://en.wikipedia...chnology_VECTOR

 

Roman, my understanding is that the Soviet Union committed much talent, time and money into biological and chemical research. Do you know if any of this knowledge has moved into cancer research?

 

I'm afraid i am not even close to be expert in this field, so it is hard for me to comment. Yes USSR was investing heavily in medical research of all kinds, but top achievements of medical science (mostly extremely expensive) were mostly unavailable for regular patients, as Soviet healthcare system (often named Semashko system after its inventor) was designed right from the beginning to provide free but basic medical service for people who  were out of reach of modern medical service before that system, not high-tech help.
  Article covering some problems of both Soviet and modern Russian healthcare systems
https://www.who.int/...5/13-030513/en/


  • 0

#3577 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,513 posts

Posted 20 October 2019 - 0948 AM

Roman, I find it amusing you chastise me for assuming Vector should shut its peaceful research, when you steadfastly have refused to believe Porton Down wasnt capable of fulfilling exactly the same role, a good 30 years before your country discovered the hazards of bio weapons.

 

I had assumed Vector shut because the Russian military couldnt afford to sustain it. In that and many things I guess I shouldnt be so surprised.

I'm afraid i am not getting your idea. Have i ever insisted Porton Down could not do some useful non-weapon related tasks? What i do not believe is you insisting they do ONLY "peaceful" things (especially when even much smaller scientific centers in Eastern Europe acknowledge playing with nerve agents, surely only "for research purpose").
Compared to other types of research, medical\chemical ones are relatively cheap (until pharmaceutical companies transform it into business, of course)


  • 0

#3578 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,513 posts

Posted 20 October 2019 - 1000 AM

https://www.nytimes....ail&login=email

Forged by Volcanoes, Kamchatka Offers Majestic, Magnetic Wilds


  • 0

#3579 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 54,744 posts

Posted 20 October 2019 - 1025 AM

Porton Down pioneered the peaceful research into Chemical and biological weapons. That is NBC defence, not offence. No, I dont suppose you would get the irony. :)


  • 0

#3580 Ssnake

Ssnake

    Virtual Shiva Beast

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 6,718 posts

Posted 20 October 2019 - 1143 AM

In all honesty, you can't develop defense against chemical agents that you don't know about, so you also have to do some limited research on potential new threats - research that arguably works for both purposes. From a practical point of view there's still a remarkable difference, specifically when it comes to developing methods for production scales beyond lab sample quantities, so the argument of "defensive NBC research" still stands. But at the same time it's not a completely binary choice to make, which works as leverage for anyone who wants to divert the debate with whataboutism.


  • 0