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#21 Panzermann

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 1000 AM

article in the newscientist about the vagabundising planet: https://www.newscien...tems-structure/
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#22 Ssnake

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 0415 AM

Further confirmation of the first hints in 1999 and 2004 that Earth was showered by debris of a nearby (less than 300 lightyears) supernova (specifically, the 60FE isotope) some 2.6 million years ago.


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#23 Panzermann

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 1210 PM

we need a name for object 2007 OR10:

http://www.nasa.gov/...he-solar-system

k2_or10_eder_miles.png

New K2 results peg 2007 OR10 as the largest unnamed
body in our solar system and the third largest of the
current roster of about half a dozen dwarf planets. The
revised measurement of 2007 OR10's diameter, 955
miles (1,535 kilometers), is about 60 miles (100
kilometers) greater than the next largest dwarf planet,
Makemake, or about one-third smaller than Pluto.
Another dwarf planet, named Haumea, has an oblong
shape that is wider on its long axis than 2007 OR10,
but its overall volume is smaller


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#24 Josh

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 1312 PM

Awesome Photo.

 

A fifth gas giant missing in our solar system?


http://www.swri.org/...iant-planet.htm

 

Its like the 5th Beatle!


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#25 Mobius

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 1349 PM

OK, but they are also using the removing extra KE from Jupiter theory to explain the 9th planet.  It was ejected out of a near Jupiter orbits to almost escape the solar system but stayed way out in the Kuiper belt.


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#26 Corinthian

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 1944 PM

we need a name for object 2007 OR10:
 

 

Planet Mcplanetface.


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#27 Ivanhoe

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 2156 PM

 

we need a name for object 2007 OR10:
 

 

Planet Mcplanetface.

 

 

We all knew lawyers are evil through and through, but this would make even ol' Beelzebub groan.

 

Can't we just go with "Death Star" or "Tatooine?"


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#28 Panzermann

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Posted 26 May 2016 - 0855 AM

ESO continues its tradition of boring names for its instruments:

eso1617 Organisation Release
ESO Signs Largest Ever Ground-based Astronomy
Contract for E-ELT Dome and Telescope Structure

25 May 2016

At a ceremony in Garching bei München, Germany on 25 May 2016, ESO signed the contract with the ACe Consortium, consisting of Astaldi, Cimolai and the nominated sub-contractor EIE Group, for the construction of the dome and telescope structure of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). This is the largest contract ever awarded by ESO and also the largest contract ever in ground-based astronomy. This occasion saw the unveiling of the construction design of the E-ELT. Construction of the dome and telescope structure will now commence.
The European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) , with a main mirror 39 metres in diameter, will be the largest optical/near-infrared telescope in the world: truly the worlds biggest eye on the sky. It will be constructed in northern Chile, on a site that has already been prepared.
The contract to build the telescopes dome and structure was signed by ESOs Director General, Tim de Zeeuw, the Chairman of Astaldi , Paolo Astaldi, and the President of Cimolai, Luigi Cimolai. ESO was delighted to welcome Italys Minister of Education, Universities and Research, H.E. Stefania Giannini, to the ceremony, which was also attended by the Italian Consul General in Munich, Renato Cianfarani, the ESO Council President, Patrick Roche, and the Italian ESO Council Delegates, Nicolò DAmico (who is also President of INAF) and Matteo Pardo, Scientific Attaché at the Italian Embassy in Berlin. The President of EIE , Gianpietro Marchiori, and other guests and representatives of the consortium were also present.
The contract covers the design, manufacture, transport, construction, on-site assembly and verification of the dome and telescope structure. With an approximate value of 400 million euros, it is the largest contract ever awarded by ESO and the largest contract ever in ground-based astronomy.
The E-ELT dome and telescope structure will take telescope engineering into new territory.
The contract includes not only the enormous 85-metre-diameter rotating dome, with a total mass of around 5000 tonnes, but also the telescope mounting and tube structure, with a total moving mass of more than 3000 tonnes. Both of these structures are by far the largest ever built for an optical/infrared telescope and dwarf all existing ones. The dome is almost 80 metres high and its footprint is comparable in area to a football pitch.
The E-ELT is being built on Cerro Armazones, a 3000-metre peak about 20 kilometres from ESOs Paranal Observatory. The access road and leveling of the summit have already been completed and work on the dome is expected to start on site in 2017.
Tim de Zeeuw, ESOs Director General said: "The E-ELT will produce discoveries that we simply cannot imagine today, and it will inspire people around the world to think about science, technology and our place in the Universe. Today's signature is a key step towards delivering the E-ELT in 2024."
Paolo Astaldi, Chairman of Astaldi added: This project is truly visionary, both in what it represents for the field of astronomy and for construction and engineering. Astaldi and our project partners, Cimolai and EIE Group, are extremely proud to have been selected by ESO through their call for tender to help make their vision a reality. Astaldi is renowned for delivering its best-in-class technical skills, quality construction and strong execution, and we will put the full force of our core strengths behind this project. It is with great excitement that I sign a contract of such astronomical ambition.
Luigi Cimolai, President of Cimolai, said: We are honoured and grateful that our company has been given the opportunity to take part in this technically advanced astronomical challenge.
The European Extremely Large Telescope will demand a high degree of quality in engineering and construction and I believe this will definitely contribute to further increase our ability to develop projects of greater and greater complexity.
Many other aspects of the construction of the E-ELT are also moving forward rapidly. ESO has already signed agreements for the construction of the first-light instruments MICADO , HARMONI and METIS , as well as the MAORY adaptive optics system for the E-ELT. Contracts for the telescopes huge secondary mirror will be signed in the near future.
The light-collecting area of the E-ELT will be bigger than all existing optical research telescopes combined and its adaptive optics system will provide images about 15 times sharper than those from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope at the same wavelength. It offers numerous possibilities for technology and engineering spin-offs, technology transfer and technology contracting. The new contract demonstrates that the E-ELT has the potential to be a powerhouse for economic development, offering contractors in ESOs Member States an opportunity to lead major projects at an international level.

More information
ESO is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the worlds most productive ground-based astronomical observatory by far. It is supported by 16 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, along with the host state of Chile. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the worlds most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and two survey telescopes. VISTA works in the infrared and is the worlds largest survey telescope and the VLT Survey Telescope is the largest telescope designed to exclusively survey the skies in visible light. ESO is a major partner in ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. And on Cerro Armazones, close to Paranal, ESO is building the 39-metre European Extremely Large Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become the worlds biggest eye on the sky.

http://www.eso.org/p...s/eso1617/?lang

nice size comparison images behind the link

Edited by Panzermann, 26 May 2016 - 0858 AM.

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#29 DB

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Posted 26 May 2016 - 1903 PM

I propose that the next one after this be called the Unfeasibly Large Telescope.

 

After that, Ludicrously large Telescope comes to mind, although Elon Musk may steal that one.

 

What about Scopey McScopeface?

 

Sorry.


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#30 Corinthian

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Posted 26 May 2016 - 2030 PM

Ludicrously Large Telescope first as that is achievable.

 

Then Unfeasibly Large Telescope for the next bigger one, which will be true to its name with the funding issues and several threats of cancelations which will end up being built and commissioned overbudget and with flaws in it making it unfeasible for intended use.

 

Scopey McScopeface-in-Space will replace Hubble and the Webb telescope.


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#31 Ivanhoe

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 0551 AM

Very Large Telescope

Extremely Large Telescope

Ridiculously Large Telescope

Absurdly Large Telescope

Ludicrously Large Telescope


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#32 Ivanhoe

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 0555 AM

Moot point, though;

 

http://spacecoastdai...ge-hole-on-sun/

 

coronalhole.gif

 

Soundtrack


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#33 Mobius

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 0803 AM

I propose that the next one after this be called the Unfeasibly Large Telescope.

 

After that, Ludicrously large Telescope comes to mind, although Elon Musk may steal that one.

 

What about Scopey McScopeface?

 

Sorry.

Hopefully Chile will remain a stable country. 


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#34 Panzermann

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 0817 AM

Hopefully Chile will remain a stable country. 


I don't think ESO is much at risk. They bring jobs and money into what are poor and empty areas anyway. I doubt that any government would risk this safe and easy income.
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#35 Soren Ras

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 0922 AM

I spent a couple of very interesting weeks at La Silla at one of the ESO observatories collecting data for my master's thesis back in '97, and my impression is that it is a very nice deal for Chile. Not only do the foreigners generally hole up on remote mountain tops and don't bother the locals, they also construct great infrastructure to allow the scientists to get there.   I recall after landing at a small airport in a tiny aircraft coming in from Santiago, I rode out of town in a rental car. Pretty soon the road deteriorated to what was essentially a dirt track, until after about 30 minutes I had to pull onto the road leading to La Silla.  And suddenly I was on what was for all intents and purposes, my very own brand-new autobahn, built by German ESO engineers to make the approach easier. That continued about 50 kilometers and you could see a lot of local construction going on now that there was a new road in place.

 

And ESO is pretty happy about Chile being a far saner and stable place than many other countries.

 

--

Soren


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#36 Mike Steele

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 0935 AM

I spent a couple of very interesting weeks at La Silla at one of the ESO observatories collecting data for my master's thesis back in '97, and my impression is that it is a very nice deal for Chile. Not only do the foreigners generally hole up on remote mountain tops and don't bother the locals, they also construct great infrastructure to allow the scientists to get there.   I recall after landing at a small airport in a tiny aircraft coming in from Santiago, I rode out of town in a rental car. Pretty soon the road deteriorated to what was essentially a dirt track, until after about 30 minutes I had to pull onto the road leading to La Silla.  And suddenly I was on what was for all intents and purposes, my very own brand-new autobahn, built by German ESO engineers to make the approach easier. That continued about 50 kilometers and you could see a lot of local construction going on now that there was a new road in place.

 

And ESO is pretty happy about Chile being a far saner and stable place than many other countries.

 

--

Soren

Chile is a Capitalist Hellhole (shhhhh) were as Venezuela is A Socialist Paradise with so much to offer......


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#37 Panzermann

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 1000 AM

Venezuela is worthless to ESO. No clear skies in the tropical climate with its clouds and rocket launches are done next door in Guyana. ;)
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#38 swerve

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 1710 PM

I propose that the next one after this be called the Unfeasibly Large Telescope.

Reminds me of Buster Gonad.


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#39 BansheeOne

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 0128 AM

Shot from ISS crossing over Kiribati, showing atmospheric airglow.

 

image-999942-galleryV9-darm-999942.jpg


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#40 Panzermann

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Posted 14 June 2016 - 0840 AM

another one. Really big this time:

June 13, 2016
New Planet Is Largest Discovered That Orbits Two
Suns


If you cast your eyes toward the constellation Cygnus, youll be looking in the direction of the largest planet yet discovered around a double-star system. Its too faint to see with the naked eye, but a team led by astronomers from NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and San Diego State University (SDSU) in California, used NASA's Kepler Space Telescope to identify the new planet, Kepler-1647b.
The discovery was announced today in San Diego at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society. The research has been accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal with Veselin Kostov, a NASA Goddard postdoctoral fellow, as lead author.

Kepler-1647 is 3,700 light-years away and approximately 4.4 billion years old, roughly the same age as Earth. The stars are similar to the sun, with one slightly larger than our home star and the other slightly smaller. The planet has a mass and radius nearly identical to that of Jupiter, making it the largest transiting circumbinary planet ever found.
Planets that orbit two stars are known as circumbinary planets, or sometimes Tatooine planets, after Luke Skywalkers home world in Star Wars. Using Kepler data, astronomers search for slight dips in brightness that hint a planet might be passing or transiting in front of a star, blocking a tiny amount of the stars light.
But finding circumbinary planets is much harder than finding planets around single stars, said SDSU astronomer William Welsh, one of the papers coauthors. The transits are not regularly spaced in time and they can vary in duration and even depth.

Its a bit curious that this biggest planet took so long to confirm, since it is easier to find big planets than small ones, said SDSU astronomer Jerome Orosz, a coauthor on the study. But it is because its orbital period is so long.

The planet takes 1,107 days just over three years to orbit its host stars, the longest period of any confirmed transiting exoplanet found so far. The planet is also much further away from its stars than any other circumbinary planet, breaking with the tendency for circumbinary planets to have close-in orbits. Interestingly, its orbit puts the planet with in the so-called habitable zonethe range of distances from a star where liquid water might pool on the surface of an orbiting planet
Like Jupiter, however, Kepler-1647b is a gas giant, making the planet unlikely to host life. Yet if the planet has large moons, they could potentially be suitable for life.

Habitability aside, Kepler-1647b is important because it is the tip of the iceberg of a theoretically predicted population of large, long-period circumbinary planets, said Welsh.
Once a candidate planet is found, researchers employ advanced computer programs to determine if it really is a planet. It can be a grueling process.

Laurance Doyle, a coauthor on the paper and astronomer at the SETI Institute, noticed a transit back in 2011. But more data and several years of analysis were needed to confirm the transit was indeed caused by a circumbinary planet. A network of amateur astronomers in the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope "Follow-Up Network provided additional observations that helped the researchers estimate the planets mass.


For more information about the Kepler mission, please see:
www.nasa.gov/kepler
A preprint of the paper can be found at:
http://arxiv.org/pdf/1512.00189v2
High-resolution artwork can be obtained at:
http://go.sdsu.edu/kepler/

http://www.nasa.gov/...orbits-two-suns


Tattooine planet? Why this obsession with a planet that is considered the most boring, most backwater and criminal planet in the slice? There are definitely more interesting planets with more then one central star in fiction.

(ya I know, cause of the movies...)

Edited by Panzermann, 14 June 2016 - 0842 AM.

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