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Did The Germans Have Bulldozers In World War 2?


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#1 Mr King

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 1927 PM

I been curious now if the Germans had bulldozers in WW2? Did they also have engineering equipment on the same technological level as their peers? If I remember right from reading Tigers In The Mud, Otto Carius mentions they were supposed to get bulldozers, but they never did.  I don't think I have asked this on here before, apologies if I already have. My memory is bad at times. 


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#2 sunday

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 1115 AM

Do not recall that exact passage on Carius' work, but a mistranslation of some kind of Berge- vehicle could be possible.

 

On the other hand, I found these two threads:

 

https://forum.axishi...pic.php?t=96421

 

https://forum.sotcw....pic.php?id=1645

 

Also, there are some testimonies of German officers being taken prisoners, then taken to the rear of Allied lines, and being amazed of the huge amount of equipment they saw. So probably they were not used to see large numbers of support vehicles.


Edited by sunday, 06 May 2017 - 1117 AM.

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#3 RETAC21

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 1237 PM

I do seem to recall that Wages of destruction mentioned that Germany was a rather un-mechanised society, see this autobahn under construction:

 

nazism-national-socialism-architecture-a


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#4 RETAC21

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 1238 PM

Bridge construction:

national-socialism-nazism-architecture-a


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#5 RETAC21

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 1239 PM

1930's America:

 

p5.jpg


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#6 Markus Becker

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 1308 PM

Both is correct. The German automotive industry was not as strong as the American but whose was? However public works were sometimes done deliberately with little construction equipment in order to get as many people into jobs as possible.
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#7 Panzermann

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 1419 PM

HANOMAG, Menck and others manufactured construction vehicles, but not many and they were expensive.

 

raupe_home_b.jpg

 

manufactured in 1940.

 

But as with the rest of the Whermacht and Waffen-SS the axis forces were not highly mechanized, so this equipment was rare.


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#8 Richard Lindquist

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 1857 PM

The divisional pioneer battalions had air compressors and chain saws.  I saw no mention of dozers, graders, or scrapers.


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#9 Mr King

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 0832 AM

Thank you all for the info. The mechanized engineering assets of the allies must of been quite a revolution in terms of capability at the time. 


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#10 lucklucky

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 1335 PM

There is a reason Allies were the first to abandon the floatplane/flying boat.


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#11 mattblack

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 1613 PM

There is a reason Allies were the first to abandon the floatplane/flying boat.

 

Yes,the helicopter and aerial refueling.


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#12 Richard Lindquist

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 1846 PM

 

There is a reason Allies were the first to abandon the floatplane/flying boat.

 

Yes,the helicopter and aerial refueling.

 

No, the bulldozer, grader, and scraper creating airfields on every piece of dry land in the ocean.

 


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#13 Richard Lindquist

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 1858 PM

https://classicdozer...jpg?w=300&h=234


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#14 rmgill

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 1027 AM


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#15 rmgill

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 1029 AM

At Tarawa




Normandy


Edited by rmgill, 08 May 2017 - 1031 AM.

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#16 rmgill

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 1032 AM

Tank dozer


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#17 rmgill

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 1033 AM

Normandy...


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#18 Ken Estes

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Posted 28 May 2017 - 0328 AM

Interesting Q. I've had the impression that nobody but the US had bulldozers [apparently a US invention] ready for use in WWII, and LL provided them to the Allies on a similar basis to other equipment.

 

The extent to which this includes roadgraders, rock crushers, steamrollers, etc. remains to be seen. Quick googling produces an upcheck for roadgraders, rock crushers, and earthmovers.

 

 

Steam shovels seem to be UK origin but UK/US development to power shovels of all sorts, in use in developed countries in WWII to varying extent.


Edited by Ken Estes, 02 June 2017 - 0503 AM.

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#19 lastdingo

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 0557 AM

http://www.ebay.de/i...r-/371949304479

 

Kaelble produced almost 1,000 PR125 bulldozers (18.5 tons, 130 hp) for the Wehrmacht beginning in 1939.

https://www.museum-d...2903&navlang=id


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